Appendix B
Biographies of Speakers*

MICHAEL BORRUS

Michael G. Borrus is a Managing Director of The Petkevich Group, LLC, a new financial services company offering capital and service for long-term value creation in high-growth industries. Most recently, Mr. Borrus was a Co-Director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE) at the University of California, Berkeley; adjunct professor in UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering; and a partner in Industry and Trade Strategies, a business consultancy.

As consultant, Mr. Borrus has worked with a wide variety of firms and governments in the U.S., Asia, and Europe. His consulting clients have included both large multinationals like Applied Materials, Motorola, Kawasaki Steel, and Teledenmark, and technology startups like Tachyon Networks and Solo Energy. Much of his consulting has focused on how business models need to adjust to successfully exploit new market opportunities or to adapt to new technologies and new competitors.

He is the author or editor of three books and over 70 chapters, articles, and monographs on a variety of topics including management of technology, high-technology competition, international trade and investment, and business strategies for information technology industries. Mr. Borrus is an honors graduate of Harvard Law School and a member of the California State Bar.

*  

As of October 2000. Includes biographies submitted by speakers.



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Appendix B Biographies of Speakers* MICHAEL BORRUS Michael G. Borrus is a Managing Director of The Petkevich Group, LLC, a new financial services company offering capital and service for long-term value creation in high-growth industries. Most recently, Mr. Borrus was a Co-Director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE) at the University of California, Berkeley; adjunct professor in UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering; and a partner in Industry and Trade Strategies, a business consultancy. As consultant, Mr. Borrus has worked with a wide variety of firms and governments in the U.S., Asia, and Europe. His consulting clients have included both large multinationals like Applied Materials, Motorola, Kawasaki Steel, and Teledenmark, and technology startups like Tachyon Networks and Solo Energy. Much of his consulting has focused on how business models need to adjust to successfully exploit new market opportunities or to adapt to new technologies and new competitors. He is the author or editor of three books and over 70 chapters, articles, and monographs on a variety of topics including management of technology, high-technology competition, international trade and investment, and business strategies for information technology industries. Mr. Borrus is an honors graduate of Harvard Law School and a member of the California State Bar. *   As of October 2000. Includes biographies submitted by speakers.

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PAPKEN DER TOROSSIAN Papken Der Torossian is Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Silicon Valley Group, Inc. Der Torossian joined SVG as president in 1984, became CEO in 1986, and was appointed Chairman of the Board in 1991. A respected industry spokesperson, he has served on the Executive and International committees of the American Electronics Association and as Chairman of the SEMI/SEMATECH Board of Directors. His over-30-year career is highlighted by three years with ECS Microsystems Inc., as President and CEO, and five years with Plantronics—as president of the Santa Cruz Division and, earlier, vice president of its telephone products group. In addition, he spent four years at Spectra-Physics and held a variety of management positions during a 12-year tenure at Hewlett-Packard. He received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master’s degree from Stanford University. PETER DRAHEIM Since 1995, Peter Draheim has been Managing Director of Philips GmbH, Hamburg, and Chief Executive Officer of Philips Semiconductors SMST, Böblingen. Previously, he was the Chief Executive Officer of Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg; the Director of Philips Semiconductors, Eindhoven; the Business Unit Manager for Microelectronics VALVO, Philips GmbH, Hamburg; the Sales and Marketing Manager for Consumer Integrated Circuits, VALVO, Philips GmbH, Hamburg; a member of the development management at the VALVO Röhrenund Halbleiterwerke Philips GmbH, Hamburg; and an assistant at the Institute for Electrophysics, Technical University Braunschweig. Mr. Draheim studied physics at the Technical University Braunschweig. KENNETH FLAMM Kenneth Flamm, who joined the LBJ School of the University of Texas at Austin in fall 1998, is a 1973 honors graduate of Stanford University and received a Ph.D. in economics from M.I.T. in 1979. From 1993 to 1995, Flamm served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Economic Security and as Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual-Use Technology Policy. He was awarded the department’s Distinguished Public Service Medal in 1995 by Defense Secretary William J. Perry. Prior to his service at the Defense Department, he spent 11 years as a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Instituto Tecnológico A. de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and the George Wash-

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ington University. He has also been an adviser to the Director General of Income Policy in the Mexican Ministry of Finance and a consultant to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the World Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the Latin American Economic System, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S Agency for International Development, and the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress. Among Dr. Flamm’s publications are Mismanaged Trade? Strategic Policy and the Semiconductor Industry (1996), Changing the Rules: Technological Change, International Competition, and Regulation in Communications (ed., with Robert Crandell, 1989), Creating the Computer (1988), and Targeting the Computer (1987). He is currently working on an analytical study of the post-Cold War defense industrial base. Flamm, an expert on international trade and the high-technology industry, teaches classes in microeconomic theory, international trade, and defense economics. EDWARD D. GRAHAM, JR. Ed Graham joined SISA (Semiconductor Equipment Suppliers Association) as its fourth President in December 1999. He came to SISA from Sandia National Laboratories, where his career spanned more than 32 years. At Sandia, he was most recently the Director of Operations and Engineering. During a portion of his career at Sandia, Graham had responsibility for all semiconductors in all nuclear weapons systems. Ed Graham has received three degrees in electrical engineering: a B.S. degree from Mississippi State University, an M.S. degree from the University of New Mexico, and a Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. In addition, he is an Extra Class Radio Operator [N5HH]. Currently, Ed is commuting between Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Austin, Texas. When he finds some free time, his other interests include skiing, hiking (with wife Sandra), reading, collecting slide rules, and observing the stock market. MASATAKA HIROSE Masataka Hirose was born in Gifu, Japan, on September 30, 1939. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electronic engineering from Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan, in 1963 and 1967, respectively, and the Ph. D. degree in electronic engineering from Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan, in 1975. From 1963 to 1964, Dr. Hirose worked in the Central Research Laboratory, Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. Since 1970, he had been with Department of Electrical Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan, and appointed as Professor from 1982 to 2001. From 1986 to 1996, he was Director of the Re-

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search Center for Integrated Systems, Hiroshima University. From 1996 to 2001, he was Director of the Research Center for Nanodevices and Systems. Since April in 2001, he has been Director General, Advanced Semiconductor Research Center of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Tsukuba, Japan. His research interests include ULSI devices and processes, and silicon quantum nanodevices. Since 1996, he has been Chairman of the 165 Research Committee for Ultra Large Scale Integrated Devices and Systems, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. Dr. Hirose is a member of IEEE, serving as an editor of Transactions on Electron Devices from 1999 to 2002; the Japan Society of Applied Physics; and the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers, Japan. GENDA J. HU Genda Hu received a B.S.E.E. from National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, R.O.C., and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1973 and 1979, respectively. After graduation he worked at IBM’s T. J. Watson Research Center as a Research Staff Member, where he pioneered the company’s CMOS technology development. Later Dr. Hu joined Xerox Palo Alto Research Center and demonstrated the industry’s first latch-up free CMOS operation. He also demonstrated the role of n+/p+ poly gate for future CMOS scaling. In 1984, he participated in the startup of Sierra Semiconductor. As a Director of Device Engineering he contributed in developing 4 generations (3um, 2um, 1.5um & 1um) of CMOS technologies and more than 100 products in analog, digital, and EEPROM. In 1990, Dr. Hu joined Cypress Semiconductor as Director of Non-volatile Technology, where he completed development of a 0.8-um BiCMOS and a 0.65-um CMOS UV EPROM/PLD technology. He then served as Vice President of Technology at ISD, San Jose, California, from 1995 to 1996. At ISD, he was in charge of bringing up multiple wafer foundries and implementing multi-level analog storage in Flash technology. Since July 1996 Dr. Hu has been the General Director of the Electronics Research and Service Organization (ERSO) of the Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) in Taiwan. He was credited as the key player in achieving the landmark victory over Micron’s anti-dumping charge against Taiwan’s DRAM industry in 1999 and SRAM industry in 2000. In May 2000, Dr. Hu joined TSMC as Vice President of Advanced Technology development. Dr. Hu is an IEEE Fellow and is also currently President of the Taiwan Semiconductor Industry Association (TSIA). KALMAN KAUFMAN Mr. Kaufman was named Applied Materials’ Corporate Vice President of Strategic Planning and New Business Development in May 1997. He joined

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Applied Materials as General Manager of the Implant Division in April 1994. In December 1995, he was appointed President of the Thermal Process and Implant group and Corporate Vice President of Applied Materials. Prior to joining Applied Materials, Mr. Kaufman was Divisional Manager and General Manager of Kulicke & Soffa. Before that, he was President of KLA Instruments, Israel. Mr. Kaufman earned his Master of Science degree in physics and his Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering from the Technion University in Israel. CHIEN-YUAN LIN Chien-Yuan Lin is a Professor in the Graduate Institute of Building and Planning at the National Taiwan University in Taipei. Dr. Lin’s major areas of research include industrial/business park planning & development; technology-park and local development; and land-use planning and control systems. Within these areas he has published more than 35 journal papers, 70 conference papers, and 44 research reports since 1987. Most of his publications are related to national industrial park development policy and planning. Dr. Lin received a B.A. in land economics from the National Chengchi University, Taiwan; an M.E. in urban planning from the National Taiwan University; and a Ph.D in transportation planning from the University of Washington. MICHAEL LUGER Michael Luger is Professor of Public Policy Analysis, Management, and Planning, and Director of the Office of Economic Development, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He formerly served as Chairman of the Department of Public Policy Analysis and as the Carl E. Pegg Professor of City and Regional Planning. Dr. Luger’s Ph.D. is in economics (Berkeley, 1981). He also holds an M.P.A. (Princeton, 1976) and M.C.P. (Berkeley, 1978). His A.B. (architecture) is from Princeton. His scholarly work is in the areas of regional economic development, public finance, infrastructure development, and science and technology policy. He is the author of many books and articles on those topics. Professor Luger has advised many organizations about economic development, including the European Commission, OECD, UNDP, the World Bank, and numerous foreign governments. Prior to moving to UNC-CH, Luger taught at Duke University (economics and public policy) and the University of Maryland (economics). He recently has served as chair or member of the Durham Board of Adjustment, Area Transportation Authority, and Merger Commission.

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TOSHIAKI MASUHARA Toshiaki Masuhara obtained B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Kyoto, Japan, in 1967 and 1969. He obtained a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Kyoto in 1977. In 1969, he became a member of the technical staff at the Hitachi Central Research Laboratory, where he initially worked on depletion-load NMOS integrated circuits and later on modeling and analysis of MOS transistors. In 1974-75, he was a special student in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department of the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked on double-diffused MOS transistors and a new CMOS process. In the ensuing years, he initiated a project to develop new high-speed CMOS static memories with NMOS cells; supervised research groups working on high-speed GaAs and bipolar integrated circuits, solar cells, and imager tubes; and was responsible for the design of VLSIs, components, and PCBs. In 1993 Dr. Masuhara became General Manager of Technology Development Operation, and in 1977 he became General Manager of the Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology Center. He became Senior Chief Engineer in 1998. Dr. Masuhara is a Fellow of IEEE (since 1994, with the citation “For Contribution in the invention and development of NMOS circuits and high-speed CMOS static memories”) and a member of the Institute of Electrical, Information and Communication Engineers of Japan. He has been an administrative committee member of the Solid-State Circuits Society of IEEE since 1998. He was the program co-chair and chairman of the 1992 and 1993 Symposium on VLSI Circuits and was the co-chair and the chairman of the 1996 and 1997 Symposium on VLSI Circuits. He received the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Award in 1990 for his contributions to NMOS depletion-load circuits and the development of high-speed CMOS memories. Since 2000, he has been a chairman of the Semiconductor Technology Roadmap Committee of Japan. He has received a Significant Invention Award, Japan, in 1994; four Significant Invention Awards, Tokyo, Japan, in 1984, 1985, 1988, and 1992; and Significant Invention Awards, Yamanashi, Japan, in 1995, and Gunma, Japan, in 1996. W. CLARK MCFADDEN Mr. McFadden specializes in international corporate transactions, especially the formulation of joint ventures, consortia, and international investigations, and enforcement proceedings. Mr. McFadden has a broad background in foreign affairs and international trade, including experience with Congressional committees, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Security Council. In 1986, he was appointed General Counsel, President’s Special Review Board, to investigate the National Security Council system (“Tower Commission”). In 1979, Mr. McFadden served as Special Counsel to the Senate Foreign

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Relations Committee on the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty (SALT II). Previously, from 1973-1976, he worked as General Counsel, Senate Armed Services Committee and was responsible to the Committee for all legislative, investigatory, and oversight activities. Mr. McFadden has a B.A. from Williams College (1968), M.B.A. from Harvard University (1972), and J.D. from Harvard Law School (1972). GORDON E. MOORE Gordon E. Moore is currently Chairman Emeritus of Intel Corporation. Moore co-founded Intel in 1968, serving initially as Executive Vice President. He became President and Chief Executive Officer in 1975 and held that post until elected Chairman and Chief Executive Officer in 1979. He remained CEO until 1987 and was named Chairman Emeritus in 1997. Gordon Moore is widely known for “Moore’s Law,” in which he predicted that the number of transistors that the industry would be able to place on a computer chip would double every year. In 1995, he updated his prediction to once every two years. While originally intended as a rule of thumb in 1965, it has become the guiding principle for the industry to deliver ever-more-powerful semiconductor chips at proportionate decreases in cost. Dr. Moore earned a B.S. in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. in chemistry and physics from the California Institute of Technology. He was born in San Francisco, California, on January 3, 1929. Gordon Moore is a director of Varian Associates, Gilead Sciences, Inc., and Transamerica Corporation. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the IEEE, and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the California Institute of Technology. He received the National Medal of Technology in 1990 from then-President George H.W. Bush. DAVID MOWERY David Mowery is Milton W. Terrill Professor of Business at the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, and Director of the Haas School’s Ph.D. program. He received his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Stanford University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Business School. Dr. Mowery has taught at Carnegie-Mellon University, served as the Study Director for the Panel on Technology and Employment of the National Academy of Sciences, and served in the Office of the United States Trade Representative as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow. He has been a member of a number of National Research Council panels, including those on the Competitive Status of the U.S. Civil Aviation Industry, on the Causes and Consequences of the Internationalization of U.S. Manu

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facturing, on the Federal Role in Civilian Technology Development, on U.S. Strategies for the Children’s Vaccine Initiative, and on Applications of Biotechnology to Contraceptive Research and Development. His research deals with the economics of technological innovation and with the effects of public policies on innovation. He has testified before Congressional committees and served as an adviser for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, various federal agencies, and industrial firms. MICHAEL R. POLCARI Michael Polcari received his Bachelor of Science degree in physics from the University of Notre Dame and his Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in physics from Stevens Institute of Technology. From 1977-1978, he was employed at National Micronetics in Kingston, New York, as a process development engineer in thin films. In 1978, he joined IBM at Kingston, New York, as a process development engineer on a silicon pilot line, moving to manager of process development in 1980. In 1982, Dr. Polcari joined the IBM Research Division at the T. J. Watson Research Center as a research staff member in the Silicon Technology department. He held various management positions in the Yorktown silicon facility until October 1992, including management of this silicon fabricator. From 1992 until 1994, he was responsible for the Advanced Lithography Systems Department of IBM’s Semiconductor Research and Development Center (SRDC) in East Fishkill, New York. In January 1994, he was appointed Research Director, Silicon Technology, and Director, Advanced Semiconductor Technology Laboratory, in the SRDC. In this assignment, he was responsible for silicon process technology in the Research Division and Advanced Semiconductor Process Development in the SRDC. In August 1999, Dr. Polcari was appointed Vice President, Procurement Engineering, IBM Global Procurement in Somers, New York. In his present position, he is responsible for driving technology convergence and qualification processes across a number of high-usage commodities within IBM. He is also responsible for re-engineering all procurement technical resources within the company to achieve maximum effectiveness in executing critical procurement engineering tasks across the varied IBM Divisions. He has served as IBM’s representative on the Board of Directors of the Semiconductor Research Corporation and in 1999 was the SRC Board Chairman. He has also served on the advisory boards of Stanford’s Center for Integrated Systems and MIT’s Microsystems Technology Laboratory. Dr. Polcari is a member of IEEE, SPIE, ECS, and APS.

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GEORGE SCALISE George Scalise is President of the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA), the premier trade association representing the microchip industry. As President, Scalise directs and oversees SIA programs focused on public policy, technology, workforce, international trade and government affairs, environment safety and health, and communications. Mr. Scalise has had a long career in the semiconductor and related industries, bringing with him over 30 years of industry experience. Prior to joining the SIA in June 1997, Scalise served as the Executive Vice President of Operations and Chief Administrative Officer at Apple Computer. Preceding Apple, he worked in numerous executive positions at National Semiconductor Corporation, Maxtor Corporation, Advanced Micro Devices, Fairchild Semiconductor, and Motorola Semiconductor. Mr. Scalise is a highly respected technology and public policy spokesperson for the industry. He has a special interest and expertise in international trade and competition issues. For over eight years, Scalise was the chairman of SIA’s Public Policy Committee, shaping and implementing the semiconductor industry’s agenda on major policy issues. Additionally, he was a founder, member, and the Chairman of the Board of the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), an industry-funded organization that provides resources for pre-competitive semiconductor research at American universities. For three years, he also served on the Board of Directors of SEMATECH, a research consortium created to gain manufacturing advantage in semiconductor technology. Mr. Scalise is active on many boards and advisory committees. In December 1999, he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Twelfth Federal Reserve District, to represent non-banking interests in the District’s nine states. He also serves on the boards of Cadence Design Systems, Network Equipment Technologies, and the Foreign Policy Association. Mr. Scalise has served on a number of university and government boards, including the University of Southern California School of Engineering Board of Councilors, the Santa Clara University Leavey School of Business Advisory Board, the University of Texas at Austin Engineering Foundation Advisory Committee, Purdue University Engineering Visiting Committee, the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board for the U.S. Department of Energy (as chairman), and the Joint High Level Advisory Panel of the US-Israel Science and Technology Committee. George Scalise graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering.

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HIDEO SETOYA On April 1, 1996, Mr. Hideo Setoya was appointed as Executive Director of the ASET. Before joining ASET, Mr. Setoya had been working for the Ministry of International Trade and Industry since 1971. His experience in the government includes planning and management of technological research and development programs and administration of electronics and information industries. He served at MITI as the Director of the Information Systems Development Division, the Information Technology Standard Division, the Industry Department of Tohoku Regional Bureau, and the Security Export Control Office. He also was assigned to MITI-related organizations as the Director of Geothermal Research Department of NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization), the Technology Research Department of MMAJ (Metal Mining Agency of Japan), and the Research Division of Chicago Center of JETRO (Japan External Trade Organization). Mr. Setoya received a bachelor,s degree from the Department of Precision Machinery Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo in 1971. BILL SPENCER Bill Spencer recently retired as Chairman of SEMATECH, a research and development consortium consisting of fourteen international corporations involved in semiconductor manufacturing. From 1990-1997, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of SEMATECH. Prior to 1990, he was Group Vice President and Senior Technical Officer at Xerox Corporation in Stamford, Connecticut, as well as Vice President and Manager of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). He was Director of Systems Development and also Director of Microelectronics at Sandia National Laboratories from 1973 to 1981, prior to joining Xerox. He began his career at Bell Telephone Laboratories in 1959. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. from Kansas State University, and an A.B. from William Jewell College in Missouri. Dr. Spencer is also a Research Professor of Medicine at the University of New Mexico, where the first implantable electronic drug delivery systems were developed jointly with Sandia National Labs. For this work, he received the Regents Meritorious Service Medal and, later, a Doctor of Science degree from William Jewell College. Until recently he served as a Director of Adobe Systems and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Computer Museum and the Austin Symphony. Currently Dr. Spencer is a Director of the Investment Corporation of America and SRI International. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of William Jewell College. Dr. Spencer has served on several National Research Council studies in the areas of technology, trade, cooperation, and competition. In 1998, he co-chaired, with former Attorney General Richard Thornburgh, an NRC workshop on “Har-

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nessing Technology for America’s Future Economic Growth.” Also, in 1998-1999 he served as a visiting professor at the Haas School of Business and the College of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley. YOICHI UNNO Yoichi Unno was born in Tokyo in 1936. He received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Keio University in 1960. He joined Tokyo Shibaura Electric Company (now Toshiba) in 1960 where he worked as research engineer in the field of electron devices. In 1980 he became Director of the Electron Devices Laboratory at the R&D Center of Toshiba. In 1985 he joined the Semiconductor group of Toshiba, where he was responsible for general management of the Semiconductor Engineering Laboratory. He became the technology executive of the Semiconductor Division in 1990 and general manager of the Microelectronics Engineering Laboratory in 1993. He joined Semiconductor Industry Research Institute Japan (SIRIJ) as acting executive director in 2000. Since 1990 he has been project leader of the New Semiconductor Century Committee of SIRIJ. CHARLES W. WESSNER Dr. Wessner is the Director of the Program on Technology and Competitiveness for the National Research Council’s Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy. Dr. Wessner began his federal career with the U.S. Treasury, served overseas as an international civil servant with the OECD and as a senior officer with the U.S. Diplomatic Corps, and directed the Office of International Technology Policy in the Technology Administration of the Department of Commerce. Since joining the National Research Council, he has led several major studies working closely with the senior levels of the U.S. government, leading industrialists, and prominent academics. Recent work includes a White House-initiated study on “The Impact of Offsets on the U.S. Aerospace Industry” and a major international study on “Competition and Cooperation in National Competition for High Technology Industry” in cooperation with the HWWA in Hamburg and the IFW in Kiel, Germany. Currently, he is directing a portfolio of activities centered around “Government-Industry Partnerships for the Development of New Technologies” and initiating work on “Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy.” The Partnerships program constitutes one of the first program-based efforts to assess U.S. policy on government-industry partnerships. Recent publications include Conflict and Cooperation in National Competition for High Technology Industry, Policy Issues in Aerospace Offsets, International Friction and Cooperation in High-Technology Development and Trade, Trends and Challenges in Aerospace Offsets, New Vistas in Transatlantic Science and Technology Cooperation, Industry-Labo-

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ratory Partnerships: A Review of the Sandia Science and Technology Park Initiative, The Advanced Technology Program: Challenges and Opportunities, and The Small Business Innovation Research Program: Challenges and Opportunities. Dr. Wessner holds degrees in international affairs from Lafayette College (Phi Beta Kappa) and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, where he obtained an M.A., an M.A.L.D., and a Ph.D. as a Shell Fellow. PATRICK WINDHAM Until April 1998, Mr. Windham served as Senior Professional Staff Member for the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space of the U.S. Senate’s Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. He helped the Senators oversee and draft legislation for several major civilian R&D agencies with responsibility for science, technology, and U.S. competitiveness; industry-government-university R&D partnerships; state economic development; federal laboratory technology transfer; high-performance computing; and computer encryption. From 1982 to 1984, he served as a legislative aide in the personal office of Senator Ernest Hollings. From 1976 to 1978, he worked as a Congressional fellow with the Senate Commerce Committee, then returned to California from 1978 to 1982 to complete doctoral course work and exams in political science at the University of California at Berkeley. Mr. Windham holds a Masters of Public Policy from the University of California at Berkeley and a B.A. from Stanford University. He is currently an independent, California-based consultant on science and technology policy issues and an adjunct professor at Stanford University.