D
Biographical Sketches

WORKSHOP PLANNING GROUP

Michael P. Ramage (NAE), Chair, is retired executive vice president, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company. Previously he was director, executive vice president, and chief technology officer of Mobil Oil Corporation. He held a number of positions at Mobil, including manager of the Process Research and Development Division; general manager of Exploration and Production Research, Development, and Technical Services; vice president of Engineering; and president of Mobil Technology Company. He has broad experience in many aspects of the petroleum industry, including R&D, chemical processes, and capital project management. He is a director of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He has served on a number of university visiting committees and is a member of a number of professional societies. He recently served as chair of the NRC Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on the NAE Council. He has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Purdue University.


David Greene is a corporate fellow of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He has spent over 20 years researching transportation and energy policy issues. His research interests include energy demand modeling, economic analysis of petroleum dependence, modeling market responses to advanced transportation technologies and alternative fuels, economic analysis of policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, and developing theory and methods for measuring the sustainability of transportation systems. Dr. Greene received a B.A. from Columbia University in 1971, an M.A. from the University of Oregon in 1973, and a Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1978. After joining ORNL in 1977, he founded the Transportation Energy Group in 1980 and later established the Transportation Research Section in 1987. Dr. Greene spent 1988-1989 in Washington, D.C., as a senior research analyst in the Office of Domestic and International Energy Policy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). He has published over 150 articles in professional journals, contributions to books, and technical reports and has given Congressional testimony on transportation and



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 48
Trends in Oil Supply and Demand, the Potential for Peaking of Conventional Oil Production, and Possible Mitigation Options: A Summary Report of the Workshop D Biographical Sketches WORKSHOP PLANNING GROUP Michael P. Ramage (NAE), Chair, is retired executive vice president, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company. Previously he was director, executive vice president, and chief technology officer of Mobil Oil Corporation. He held a number of positions at Mobil, including manager of the Process Research and Development Division; general manager of Exploration and Production Research, Development, and Technical Services; vice president of Engineering; and president of Mobil Technology Company. He has broad experience in many aspects of the petroleum industry, including R&D, chemical processes, and capital project management. He is a director of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He has served on a number of university visiting committees and is a member of a number of professional societies. He recently served as chair of the NRC Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on the NAE Council. He has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering from Purdue University. David Greene is a corporate fellow of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He has spent over 20 years researching transportation and energy policy issues. His research interests include energy demand modeling, economic analysis of petroleum dependence, modeling market responses to advanced transportation technologies and alternative fuels, economic analysis of policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from transportation, and developing theory and methods for measuring the sustainability of transportation systems. Dr. Greene received a B.A. from Columbia University in 1971, an M.A. from the University of Oregon in 1973, and a Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1978. After joining ORNL in 1977, he founded the Transportation Energy Group in 1980 and later established the Transportation Research Section in 1987. Dr. Greene spent 1988-1989 in Washington, D.C., as a senior research analyst in the Office of Domestic and International Energy Policy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). He has published over 150 articles in professional journals, contributions to books, and technical reports and has given Congressional testimony on transportation and

OCR for page 48
Trends in Oil Supply and Demand, the Potential for Peaking of Conventional Oil Production, and Possible Mitigation Options: A Summary Report of the Workshop energy issues. He has recently being doing analyses of future global supply and demand of oil and energy transition issues. From 1997 to 2000, Dr. Greene served as the first editor in chief of the Journal of Transportation and Statistics, the only scholarly periodical published by the U.S. Department of Transportation. He currently serves on the editorial boards of Transportation Research D, Energy Policy, Transportation Quarterly, and the Journal of Transportation and Statistics. Active in the Transportation Research Board (TRB) and the National Research Council, Dr. Greene has served on several standing and ad hoc committees. He is past chair and member emeritus of the TRB’s Energy Committee, past chair of the Section on Environmental and Energy Concerns, and a recipient of the TRB’s Pyke Johnson Award. Robert L. Hirsch is a consultant with Science Applications International Corporation. His past positions include executive advisor to the president of Advanced Power Technologies, Inc.; vice president, Washington Office, Electric Power Research Institute; vice president and manager, Research and Technical Services Department, ARCO Oil and Gas Company; chief executive officer, ARCO Power Technologies, a company that he founded; manager, Baytown Research and Development Division, and general manager, Exploratory Research, Exxon Research and Engineering Company; assistant administrator for Solar, Geothermal, and Advanced Energy Systems (Presidential appointment); and director, Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy Research, U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. He has served on numerous advisory committees, including as a member of the DOE Energy Research Advisory Board and a number of DOE national laboratory advisory boards. He has served on several NRC committees, including the one that wrote the report Fuels to Drive Our Future, which examined the economics and technologies for producing transportation fuels from U.S. domestic resources; was chairman of the Committee to Examine the Research Needs of the Advanced Extraction and Process Technology Program; was a member of the Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use; and was a former chairman and member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He has recently been involved in analysis and studies of the various views of potential global oil production, peaking, and possible transitions to other sources of liquid fuels. He brings expertise in a number of areas of science, technology, and business related to oil and gas production, analysis of oil reserves and future oil production, other forms of energy production and consumption, research and development, and public policy. He received a Ph.D. in engineering and physics from the University of Illinois. Scott W. Tinker is director, Bureau of Economic Geology, University of Texas, Austin; State Geologist of Texas; and Edwin Allday Endowed Chair of Subsurface Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences. Earlier, he held a number of positions at Marathon Oil–Petroleum Technology Center, rising to advanced senior geologist. He was also once a geologist at Union Pacific Resources and at Robert M. Sneider Exploration. He has extensive experience in the broad aspects of basic and applied energy and environmental research; in reservoir characterization studies of large hydrocarbon fields; and expertise in carbonate sedimentology, stratigraphy, three-dimensional reservoir modeling, and analysis and interpretation of diverse sets of geological, seismic, and engineering data. He serves on a wide variety of boards, committees, and organizations. He served as a distinguished

OCR for page 48
Trends in Oil Supply and Demand, the Potential for Peaking of Conventional Oil Production, and Possible Mitigation Options: A Summary Report of the Workshop lecturer for the Society of Petroleum Engineers (2002) and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) (1997) and is the current International Distinguished Ethics Lecturer for the AAPG. He is president elect of the American Association of State Geologists (2005), received distinguished service awards from the AAPG (2005) and the West Texas Geological Society (2001), and the Marathon Achievement of Company Excellence Award among others. He is a member of the NRC Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and served as chair, Committee on U.S. Natural Gas Demand and Supply Projections: A Workshop. He brings expertise on petroleum and natural gas resources and reserves, oil and gas technologies, reservoir characterization, and geological sciences to the planning group. He has a B.S. in geology and business administration, Trinity University; an M.S. in geological sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and a Ph.D. in geological sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder. NRC STAFF James J. Zucchetto is director, Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, National Research Council. Since joining the National Academies in 1985, Dr. Zucchetto has been involved in a variety of multidisciplinary studies related to energy technologies, engineering, the environment, research and development programs, and public policy. In his work at the NRC, he has contributed to numerous studies and reports having an important influence on federal programs and policies. Prior to joining the National Academies, he was on the faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Regional Science, University of Pennsylvania; a guest researcher at the Institute of Marine Ecology and Zoologiska Institutionen, University of Stockholm; an associate in engineering, Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida; and a member of the technical staff, Bell Telephone Laboratories. He serves on the editorial advisory board of the International Journal of Ecological Modelling and Systems Ecology and is a former member of the editorial advisory board of Ecological Economics. He has been involved in a wide variety of activities related to energy technologies and associated environmental, economic, and policy implications since the early 1970s and has published approximately 50 articles in refereed journals, books, and conference proceedings, two monographs, and one book. He has a Ph.D. in environmental engineering sciences from the University of Florida, an M.S.M.E. from New York University, and a B.S.M.E. from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (Polytechnic University).