of tests have been made to compare measurement results obtained by it with data obtained by floating buoys and laser wave height measurements. To see an example, go to www.oceanwaves.org and click on “real time data.”

  

17 See L. R. Wyatt and J. J. Green, “The Availability and Accuracy of HF Radar Wave Measurements,” Vol. 1, 515-517, IEEE (2002); S. Lehner, J. Schulz-Stellenfleth, and A. Niedermeir, “Detection of Extreme Waves Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Images,” Vol. 3, 1893-1895, IEEE, (2002); D. Hoja, J. Schulz-Stellenfleth, S. Lehner, and T. Konig, “Global Analysis of Ocean Wave Systems from SAR Wave Mode Data,” Vol. 2, 934-936, IEEE (2002).

APPENDIX A

  

1 Professor Chris Garrett, University of Victoria, British Columbia, personal communication with Craig B. Smith, October 5, 2005.

  

2 Kristian B. Dysthe (2000), “Modeling a Rogue Wave—Speculations or a Realistic Possibility?” in Olagnon and Athanassoulis (2001), op. cit. 255-264.

  

3 Efim Pelinovski et al. (2000), “Nonlinear Wave Focusing as a Mechanism of the Freak Wave Generation in the Ocean,” in Olagnon and Athanassoulis (2001), op. cit., 193-204.

  

4 Peter Janssen, “Nonlinear four-wave interaction and freak waves,” in Müller (2005), 85-90.

  

5 Kristian B. Dysthe (2000), “Modeling a Rogue Wave—Speculations or a Realistic Possibility?” in Olagnon and Athanassoulis (2001), op. cit., 255-264; also in the same reference: Miguel Onorato et al., “Occurrence of Freak Waves from Envelope Equations in Random Ocean Wave Simulations,” 181, and Efim Pelinovski et al., “Nonlinear Wave Focusing as a Mechanism of the Freak Wave Generation in the Ocean,” 193-204.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement