Appendix Biographical Information for Committee Members

William L. Graf (Chair) is Foundation University Professor and professor of geography at the University of South Carolina. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. His Ph.D. is from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a major in physical geography and a minor in water resources management. His research and teaching have focused on river-channel change and human impacts on river processes, including the downstream effects of large dams. He has authored or edited 9 books, more than 130 scientific papers, book chapters, and reports, more than 60 successful grant proposals, and more than 100 public presentations. He is past president of the Association of American Geographers and is a National Associate of the National Academy of Science. He has chaired numerous National Research Council committees dealing with river science and policy. He worked with the Presidential Commission on Western Water and was appointed to the Presidential Commission on American Heritage Rivers.


Michael E. Campana directs the Institute for Water and Watersheds at Oregon State University, where he is also professor of geosciences. He was formerly the Albert J. and Mary Jane Black Professor of Hydrogeology and director of the Water Resources Program at the University of New Mexico, where he worked from 1989-2006. He was a research hydrologist at the Desert Research Institute in Reno and taught in the University of Nevada’s Hydrologic Sciences Program from 1976 to 1989. His interests include hydrophilanthropy, water resources in developing countries, transboundary water resources issues, regional hydrogeology, surface water-ground



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Appendix Biographical Information for Committee Members William L. Graf (Chair) is Foundation University Professor and professor of geography at the University of South Carolina. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. His Ph.D. is from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a major in physical geography and a minor in water resources manage- ment. His research and teaching have focused on river-channel change and human impacts on river processes, including the downstream effects of large dams. He has authored or edited 9 books, more than 130 scientific papers, book chapters, and reports, more than 60 successful grant propos- als, and more than 100 public presentations. He is past president of the Association of American Geographers and is a National Associate of the National Academy of Science. He has chaired numerous National Research Council committees dealing with river science and policy. He worked with the Presidential Commission on Western Water and was appointed to the Presidential Commission on American Heritage Rivers. Michael E. Campana directs the Institute for Water and Watersheds at Oregon State University, where he is also professor of geosciences. He was formerly the Albert J. and Mary Jane Black Professor of Hydrogeology and director of the Water Resources Program at the University of New Mexico, where he worked from 1989-2006. He was a research hydrologist at the Desert Research Institute in Reno and taught in the University of Nevada’s Hydrologic Sciences Program from 1976 to 1989. His interests include hydrophilanthropy, water resources in developing countries, transbound- ary water resources issues, regional hydrogeology, surface water-ground 243

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244 HYDROLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND FISHES OF THE KLAMATH RIVER BASIN water interactions, and arid zone hydrology. He has supervised the work of 66 graduate students and has authored/co-authored over 70 reports and journal articles. His international work is primarily in Nicaragua, Hondu- ras, Panama, Kazakhstan, and the South Caucasus, where he directs the six-country NATO/OSCE project South Caucasus River Monitoring. He was a Fulbright Scholar to Belize in 1996 and a Visiting Scientist at the Re- search Institute for Groundwater in Cairo (Fall 1995) and the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna (Fall 2002). He has served on several previous National Research Council committees (USGS research, NAWQA Program) and currently serves on the Sustainable Oceans, Coasts and Wa- terways Advisory Committee of the H. J. Heinz Center. Dr. Campana is founder, president, and treasurer of the Ann Campana Judge Foundation (www.acjfoundation.org), a 501(c)(3) charitable foundation that funds and undertakes projects related to water, health, and sanitation in developing countries. He earned his BS in geology from the College of William and Mary and his MS and Ph.D. degrees in hydrology from the University of Arizona. George Mathias Kondolf is a professor of environmental planning and geography at the University of California at Berkeley, where he teaches hy- drology for planners, restoration of rivers and streams, ecological analysis in urban design, and introduction to environmental sciences. He earned an A.B. in geology (cum laude) from Princeton University, an M.S. in earth sciences from the University of California at Santa Cruz, and a Ph.D. in ge- ography and environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. He is a fluvial geomorphologist whose research concerns environmental river management, influences of land use on rivers, notably the effects of mining and dams on river systems, interactions of riparian vegetation and channel form, geomorphic influences on habitat for salmon and trout, al- ternative flood management strategies, and assessment of ecological restora- tion. In addition to numerous technical papers on these and related topics, he recently published the reference work Tools in Fluvial Geomorphology (Wiley 2003). Dr. Kondolf has served as a consultant to clients including the Federal Republic of Germany, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the California Attorney General, the California Department of Fish and Game and Department of Water Resources, various water districts and utilities, aggregate producers, and environmental organizations. Dr. Kondolf is cur- rently a member of the Environmental Advisory Board to the Chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Jay R. Lund is a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Davis. He earned a B.A. in regional planning

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24 APPENDIX and international relations at the University of Delaware in 1979, a B.S. in civil engineering at the University of Washington in 1983, an M.A. in geography at the University of Washington in 1983, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering at the University of Washington in 1986. He served on advisory committees for the 1998 and 2005 California Water Plans, as convenor of the California Water and Environment Modeling Forum, and editor of the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management. He is a member of the International Water Academy and has won several awards for water- related research from the American Society of Civil Engineers. He is the principal developer of the CALVIN economic-engineering optimization model of California’s water supply system, applied regionally and statewide to explore water markets, conjunctive use, integrated water management, climate change, and environmental restoration. He has had a major role in water and environmental system modeling projects in California, the United States, and overseas. His principal specialties are simulation, optimization, and management of large-scale water and environmental systems, the ap- plication of economic ideas and methods, reservoir operation theory, and water demand theory and methods. He is author or co-author of over 180 publications. Judith L. Meyer is a distinguished research professor emeritus at the Univer- sity of Georgia’s Institute of Ecology and former director of the River Basin Center. She currently serves on the NRC Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology and has served on the Water Science and Technology Board and several NRC committees. She is a past president of the Ecological Society of America. She currently chairs the Environmental Processes and Effects Committee of the EPA’s Science Advisory Board. She chairs the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committees of American Rivers and is vice-chair of the Independent Science Board of the California Bay Delta Authority. Her expertise is in river and stream ecosystems with emphasis on nutrient dynamics, microbial food webs, riparian zones, ecosystem man- agement, river restoration, and urban rivers. She received the 2003 Award of Excellence in Benthic Science from the North American Benthological Society. Dr. Meyer earned a B.S. from University of Michigan, an M.S. from University of Hawaii, and a Ph.D. from Cornell University. Dennis D. Murphy is research professor in the Biology Department and director of the graduate program in ecology, evolution, and conserva- tion biology at the University of Nevada, Reno. He earned a B.S. at the University of California, Berkeley and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. Until recently, he served as director and then as President of the Center for Conservation Biology at Stanford. Author of more than 170 published papers and book chapters on the biology of butterflies and on key issues in

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246 HYDROLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND FISHES OF THE KLAMATH RIVER BASIN the conservation of imperiled species, Dr. Murphy has worked in conflict resolution in land-use planning on private property since the first federal Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) on San Bruno Mountain, including HCPs in the Pacific Northwest, southern California, and Nevada. He won the industry’s oldest and most respected prize in conservation, the Chevron Conservation Award; has been named a Pew Scholar in Conservation and the Environment; and has received the California Governor’s Leader- ship Award in Economics and the Environment. Dr. Murphy has served a number of scientific societies and environmental organizations and is past president of the Society for Conservation Biology. His professional activities outside academia include service on the Interagency Spotted Owl Scientific Advisory Committee, enjoined by Congress to develop a solution to that planning crisis in the Pacific Northwest, as chair of the National Park Service’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Bighorn Sheep, as cochair of the Department of State’s American-Russian Young Investigators Program in Biodiversity and Ecology, as codirector of the statewide Nevada Biodiver- sity Initiative based at the University of Nevada at Reno, and as chair of the Scientific Review Panel of the first Natural Community Conservation Planning Program in southern California’s coastal sage scrub ecosystem. He served the National Research Council on its Committee on Endangered and Threatened Species in the Platte River Basin and Committee on Scientific Issues in the Endangered Species Act and in its contribution to the recent General Accounting Office review of desert tortoise management and re- covery. He has been a member of both the Applied Science Panel and the Interagency Working Group of the federal-state Coastal Salmon Initiative in northern California. Christopher A. Myrick is assistant professor of fishery biology and aquacul- ture in the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University. Dr. Myrick is also facility manager of the Foothills Fisheries Laboratory of Colorado State University. He earned a B.S. in resource man- agement at the University of California (Berkeley) and an M.S. and Ph.D. in ecology from the University of California (Davis). Dr. Myrick’s research interests are in culture and physiology of native fishes, physiological ecology of fishes, and aquatic ecology. He has written numerous articles on trout, steelhead, and salmonids in California. Other research has explored the temperature effects on physiological mechanisms within fishes. Tammy J. Newcomb is the Lake Huron Basin Coordinator for the Michi- gan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division. In this position, she coordinates ecosystem and watershed management for the Lake Huron drainages and the Lake Huron sport, tribal, and commercial fisheries. Dr. Newcomb is an adjunct faculty member at Virginia Polytechnic Institute

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24 APPENDIX and State University and Michigan State University. Her research focus is on salmonid population dynamics, watershed and stream habitat management, instream flow management, and stream temperature modeling. Dr. New- comb earned a Ph.D. at Michigan State University. Dr. Newcomb served on the NRC Committee on Endangered and Threatened Fishes in the Klamath River Basin and the Committee on Water Resources Management, Instream Flows, and Salmon Survival in the Columbia River. Jayantha Obeysekera earned a B.S. degree in civil engineering from Univer- sity of Sri Lanka; an M.E. in hydrology from University of Roorkee, India; and a Ph.D. in civil engineering with specialization in water resources from Colorado State University. Prior to joining the South Florida Water Man- agement District, he worked as an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at Colorado State University, where he taught courses in hydrology and water resources and conducted research in stochastic hydrol- ogy. In addition, he has taught courses in water resources at George Wash- ington University, Washington, DC, and at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida. During his career, Dr. Obeysekera has published numerous research articles in refereed journals in the field of water resources. Dr. Obeysekera has over 20 years of experience practicing water resources en- gineering with an emphasis on both stochastic and deterministic modeling. He has taught short courses on modeling in the countries of the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Spain, Sri Lanka, and the U.S. He was a member of the Surface Runoff Committee of the American Geophysical Union and is currently serving as a member of a Federal Task Group on Hydrologic Modeling. During the last 17 years, Dr. Obeysekera has worked in south Florida as a lead member of a modeling team dealing with development and applications of computer simulation models for Kissimmee River restora- tion and the restoration of the Everglades Ecosystem. Currently, he is serv- ing as the director of the Hydrologic and Environmental Systems Modeling Department at the South Florida Water Management District. John Pitlick is an associate professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, with research interests in surface water hydrology and fluvial geomorphol- ogy. He earned a Ph.D. from Colorado State University. His research ex- amines processes of sediment transport and channel change in both natural and altered river systems. The principal goal of this research is to develop process-based models coupling hydrology, geomorphology, and material transport across a continuum of scales. Additional research being done in collaboration with fisheries biologists and aquatic ecologists seeks a more detailed understanding of interactions between geomorphology and eco- system processes, including food-web dynamics and nutrient cycling. Most

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248 HYDROLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND FISHES OF THE KLAMATH RIVER BASIN of this research is field based, with a geographic emphasis on rivers in the western United States. Clair B. Stalnaker has been a key player in the instream flow arena for over 30 years—in research, method development and implementation, and policy. He organized and served as leader of the Cooperative Instream Flow Service Group (and various subsequent titles) under the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This program brought together an interagency group of multidisciplinary scientists for the purpose of advancing state-of-the-art sci- ence and elevating the field of instream flow to national and international prominence. The primary focus of this group has been toward a holistic view of river science addressing the major components of instream flow management, namely hydrology, geomorphology, water quality, aquatic biology and connectivity and promoting instream flow regimes (incorpo- rating intra- and inter-annual variability). He retired as a senior scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey where he was chief of the River Systems Management Section, Midcontinent Ecological Science Center, Fort Col- lins Colorado. He served as assistant professor of fisheries and wildlife science (1966 to 1976) and adjunct professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at Utah State University and has served as adjunct professor in the Departments of Earth Resources and Fisheries and Wildlife, Colorado State University. He has served on national and international technical committees and task forces and authored numerous publications focusing on the instream flow aspects of water allocation and river management. He served on the WSTB Committee on Western Water Management and is a member of the Science Advisory Board for the Trinity River Restoration Program, California. Gregory V. Wilkerson is a visiting research assistant professor in the Depart- ment of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Wilkerson’s research interests include research and development of solutions to water resource problems, multi-disciplinary ap- proaches to stream restoration, river mechanics, sedimentation and erosion, environmental hydraulics, engineering hydrology, and statistics. His current research includes analytical model development for bioengineered systems, physical modeling of rivers, and quantifying the impact of increased water discharges in ephemeral channels. Dr. Wilkerson is currently a principal in- vestigator with the National Center for Earth-Surface Dynamics, a National Science Foundation science and technology center. Dr. Wilkerson earned a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1989, an M.S. (1995) and a Ph.D. (1999) in civil engineering from Colo- rado State University.

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24 APPENDIX Przemyslaw A. Zielinski is a senior quantitative analyst with Ontario Power Generation. As a senior analyst, he develops quantitative and qualitative methodology and analytic tools in assessing operational risk for Ontario Power Generation. Previously he was involved in OPG dam safety assess- ments as a dam safety hydrologist, and then as a senior scientist at Ontario Hydro. He was also assistant professor at Warsaw Technical University in Poland. His expertise is in the areas of risk analysis, assessment, and man- agement; applied probability, statistics and stochastic processes; decision making under uncertainty; linear and nonlinear optimization; modeling of dynamical systems; and hydrology and water resources management. He chairs the Committee on Dam Safety of the International Commission on Large Dams. Dr. Zielinski earned his masters in mathematics from the Uni- versity of Warsaw and masters in civil engineering and Ph.D. in stochastic hydrology from Warsaw Technical University in Poland.

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