Appendixes



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Appendixes

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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Christopher C. Green, Chair, is the assistant dean for Asia Pacific of the Wayne State School of Medicine (SOM) in Beijing, China. He is also a clinical fellow in neuroimaging/MRI in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology and the Depart- ment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences of the SOM and the Detroit Medical Center (DMC). His medical specialties are brain imaging, forensic medi- cine and toxicology, and neurophysiology, and his personal medical practice is in the differential diagnoses of neurodegenerative disease. He has served and con- tinues to serve on many government advisory groups and private sector corporate boards of directors. Immediately prior to his current position, he was executive director for emergent technology research for the SOM/DMC. From 1985 through 2004 he was executive director, Global Technology Policy, and chief technology officer for General Motors’ Asia-Pacific Operations. His career at General Motors included positions as head, Biomedical Sciences Research, and executive director, General Motors Research Laboratory for Materials and Environmental Sciences. His distinguished career with the CIA extended from 1969 to 1985 as a senior divi- sion analyst and assistant national intelligence officer for science and technology. His Ph.D. is from the University of Colorado Medical School in neurophysiology, and his M.D. is from the Autonomous City University in El Paso, Texas/Monterey, Mexico, with honors. He also holds the National Intelligence Medal and is a fellow in the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Dr. Green is a current member of the National Research Council’s Standing Committee on Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review (TIGER). Diane E. Griffin, Vice Chair, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine and is professor and chair of the Department of 

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0 EMErGING COGNITIVE NEUrOSCIENCE AND rELATED TECHNOLOGIES Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned a biology degree from Augustana College, followed by an M.D. (1968) and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. She interned at Stanford University Hospital between 1968 and 1970, before beginning her career at Johns Hopkins as a postdoctoral fellow in virology and infectious disease in 1970. After completing her postdoctoral work, she was named an assistant professor of medicine and neurology. Since then, she has held the positions of associate professor, professor, and now professor and chair. She served as an investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1973 to 1979. Dr. Griffin’s research interest includes alphaviruses and acute encephalitis. She is also working on virus infection and its effects on immune responses. Dr. Griffin is the principal inves- tigator on a variety of grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. She is a past president of the American Society for Microbiology of the American Society for Virology and the Association of Medical School Microbiology Chairs. She is the author or coauthor of a number of scholarly papers and articles. Dr. Griffin is a current member of the TIGER standing committee. James J. Blascovich is a professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Blascovich earned a B.S. in psychology at Loyola Univer- sity of Chicago and a Ph.D. in social psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. He held academic positions at the University of Nevada, Reno, Marquette University, and SUNY at Buffalo before coming to the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Blascovich directs the Research Center for Virtual Environ- ments and Behavior and is a past president of both the Society for Personality and Social Psychology and the Society of Experimental Social Psychology. He is a member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research, a charter fellow of the Association of Psychological Science, and a fellow of the American Psy- chological Association. Dr. Blascovich was awarded the Inaugural Australasian Social Psychology Society/Society of Personality and Social Psychology Teach- ing Fellowship as well as an Erskine Fellowship and a Science Prestige Lecture- ship at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. He won the Gordon Allport Prize Intergroup Relations Prize for 2007. He has also received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Blascovich has served on several grant review panels and was appointed to the National Research Council’s Committee to Evaluate the Scien- tific Evidence on the Polygraph. He chaired the Committee on Opportunities in Basic Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences for the military. He has served on many editorial boards of journals, including psychological Science and the Journal of personality and Social psychology, psychological Inquiry, Media psychology, and presence. In addition to receiving periodic funding from the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Blascovich’s research has received continuous funding from the National Science Foundation for more than 18 years.

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 AppENDIX A Jeffrey M. Bradshaw is a senior research scientist at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition where he leads the research group developing the KAoS policy and domain services framework. Formerly, he led research groups at The Boeing Company and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. He has been a Fulbright senior scholar at the European Institute for Cognitive Sci- ences and Engineering in Toulouse, France; an honorary visiting researcher at the Center for Intelligent Systems and their Applications and AIAI at the Uni- versity of Edinburgh, Scotland; a visiting professor at the Institut Cognitique at the University of Bordeaux; is former chair of ACM SIGART; and former chair of the RIACS Science Council for NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Bradshaw sat on the external advisory board for the Next Generation Intelligent Systems Grand Challenge at Sandia National Laboratories and is a current member of the Technical Committee for IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics. Recently, he served as co-program chair for Intelligent User Interfaces and as program vice chair of the 2008 IEEE International Conference on Distributed Human-Machine Systems. Dr. Bradshaw serves on the board of directors of the International Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems and is a member of the Parametric Human Consortium. He is on the editorial board of the Journal of Autonomous Agents and Multi­Agent Systems, the Web Semantics Journal, Schedae Informaticae, and the Web Intelligence Journal, and was formerly on the board of the Knowledge Acquisition Journal and the International Journal of Human­Computer Studies. He led the DARPA- and NASA-funded ITAC study team “Software Agents for the Warfighter” and participated in NASA Blue Sky Study Groups for the “Human-Centered Vision of Mars Exploration” and for the “Small Pressurized Rover.” Scott C. Bunce is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Drexel University Col- lege of Medicine, and holds a joint position in Drexel’s School of Biomedical Engineering, Science & Health Systems. Dr. Bunce received doctorates in clini- cal and personality psychology from the University of Michigan and completed his postdoctoral training in the Department of Psychiatry at Michigan. He is the director of Drexel’s Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit (CNSRU), a labora- tory that investigates a broad range of topics related to affective and cognitive neuroscience using noninvasive measures of brain function. A particular focus of the CNSRU in recent years has been the development and implementation of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), an optical technology that allows inexpensive and portable cortical neuroimaging. In collaboration with Drexel’s optical imaging team in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Dr. Bunce has received numerous grants to investigate the utility of fNIRS for monitoring and augmenting cognition, e.g., attention and memory, and for credibility assessment/ deception detection. A motivating interest of the optical imaging team is to transition fNIRS-based functional neuroimaging into clinical and research appli- cations that are not practical for other neuroimaging modalities. In addition to his

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 EMErGING COGNITIVE NEUrOSCIENCE AND rELATED TECHNOLOGIES research, Dr. Bunce is an active clinician and educator, and has focused on the development of innovative strategies to provide mental health care and addiction treatment to HIV+ patients. John Gannon is vice president for global analysis, a new line of business within BAE Systems Information Technology. Dr. Gannon joins BAE Systems after serving as staff director of the House Homeland Security Committee, the first new committee established by Congress in more than 30 years. In 2002-2003, he was a team leader in the White House’s Transitional Planning Office for the Depart- ment of Homeland Security. He served previously in the most senior analytic positions in the intelligence community, including as CIA’s director of European analysis, deputy director for intelligence, chairman of the National Intelligence Council, and assistant director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Produc- tion. In the private sector, he developed the analytic workforce for Intellibridge Corporation, a Web-based provider of outsourced analysis for government and corporate clients. Dr. Gannon served as a naval officer in southeast Asia and later in several Naval Reserve commands, retiring as a captain. He holds a Ph.D. from Washington University in St. Louis. He is an adjunct professor in the National Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. Dr. Gannon is a current member of the TIGER standing committee. Michael Gazzaniga, a member of the Institute of Medicine, is the first director of the Sage Center for the Study of the Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his Ph.D. in psychobiology from the California Institute of Technology. In 1992, he became the director of the Center for Neuroscience at the University of California, Davis. Through his extensive work with split-brain patients, Dr. Gazzaniga has made important advances in our understanding of functional lateralization in the human brain and of how the cerebral hemispheres communicate with one another. His research is well known not only to clinical and basic science circles but also to the lay public. He captured the main fea- tures of this work in his widely acclaimed book The Social Brain. His book Mind Matters served as an introduction to problems in mental disorders. About his book Nature’s Mind the New York Times said it would do for brain research what Stephen Hawking had done for cosmology. His 1995 book, The Cognitie Neurosciences, featured the work of 92 scientists. It is now recognized as the sourcebook for the field and is in its third edition. He has just published another book, Human: The Science Behind What Makes Us Unique. Dr. Gazzaniga is the president of the Cognitive Neuroscience Institute, which he founded in 1982, and is the editor in chief emeritus of the Journal of Cognitie Neuroscience, which he also founded. In 1997, Dr. Gazzaniga was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has been elected president of the American Psycho- logical Society and also serves on the President’s Council on Bioethics.

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 AppENDIX A Elizabeth Loftus, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, is distin- guished professor at the University of California, Irvine. She holds faculty posi- tions in three departments (Psychology and Social Behavior; Criminology, Law, and Society; and Cognitive Sciences) and is also a fellow of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, She was also recently appointed professor of law. She received a Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University. Since then, she has published 22 books, including the award-winning Eyewitness Testimony, and over 475 scientific articles. Dr. Loftus’s research over the last 30 years has focused on the malleability of human memory. She has been rec- ognized for this research with five honorary doctorates and election to the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the American Philosophical Society. She is past presi- dent of the Association for Psychological Science, the Western Psychological Association, and the American Psychology-Law Society. Gregory J. Moore is a neuroscientist, physician, engineer, and physicist with over 15 years of experience in the development and application of advanced neuroimaging tools to investigate the brain and brain illness. After obtaining a Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he developed advanced nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques for neuroscience research, he subsequently accepted a position at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he led novel technology development projects in the area of imaging. He later added an M.D., followed by residency training in diagnostic radiology at Penn State. He is currently professor and director of the Behavioral Neuroimaging Research Division in the Department of Psychiatry at Penn State College of Medicine’s Hershey Medical Center and also holds additional appointments in the Department of Radiology and the Department of Neural and Behavioral Sci- ences. Dr. Moore has authored more than 170 scientific publications (including 66 peer-reviewed journal manuscripts), holds two U.S. patents, has won several pres- tigious scientific awards, is a sought-after speaker at national and international scientific meetings, and has served on numerous expert advisory committees and study sections, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He has received support for his research from the NIH, national foundations, and corporate spon- sors. Dr. Moore’s research mission is to lead the discovery, development, and validation of neuroimaging biomarkers utilizing advanced neuroimaging tools coupled with powerful bioinformatics technology to improve diagnosis, to guide pharmacologic and behavioral interventions, and to predict treatment response in children and adults devastated by brain illness. Recent developments in his labo- ratory include technology for rapid image-guided neurochemical and molecular interventions. Jonathan Moreno, a member of the Institute of Medicine, is the David and Lyn Silfen University Professor and a professor of medical ethics and of history and sociology of science at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Moreno is also a

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 EMErGING COGNITIVE NEUrOSCIENCE AND rELATED TECHNOLOGIES senior fellow at the Center for American Progress in Washington, D.C. where he edits the journal Science progress, and a visiting professor of biomedical ethics at the University of Virginia. His books include Undue risk: Secret State Experi­ ments on Humans (2000) and Mind Wars: Brain research and National Defense (2006). He co-chaired the Committee on Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research, has served as a senior staff member for two presidential advi- sory committees, and has given invited testimony for both houses of Congress. Dr. Moreno has published more than 250 papers, reviews, and book chapters and is a member of several editorial boards. He is a frequent guest on news and infor- mation programs and is often cited and quoted in major national publications. He has served on numerous committees of the National Academies. John R. Rasure is president and CEO of the MIND Institute, a nonprofit orga- nization dedicated to the development of neurodiagnostic tools for brain disease and disorders. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Kansas State University. Prior to his appointment at MIND in 2005, Dr. Rasure spent over 10 years working in high tech, most recently as senior vice president at Photon Research Associates, Inc., a subsidiary of Raytheon, where he was responsible for the commercial remote sensing and geographic information systems business area and intelligence community business development related to GIS. Dr. Rasure began his career as an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of New Mexico. Within 6 years he had written more than 40 publications, secured more than $3 million in grants, and earned early promotion and tenure by building an internationally respected software research laboratory. His work focused on VLSI design, real-time image-processing architectures, visual programming, medical imaging, and remote sensing. Mark (Danny) Rintoul is the head of the Computational Biology Department and also leads the new initiatives area for the computing sciences organization at Sandia National Laboratories. He holds a Ph.D. in computational physics from Purdue University. He is currently leading several initiatives in the laboratory related to applying state-of-the-art engineering technology and high-performance computing to problems in neural science. At Sandia, he works closely with the defense sciences organization to help integrate science and technology products into cutting-edge applications, He also serves as a liaison to the MIND Institute in Albuquerque and is an associate member of the University of New Mexico’s Cancer Research and Treatment Center. Nathan D. Schwade is the Chemical and Biological Program Manager for Threat Reduction at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where he manages a $30 million portfolio using basic and applied science to assist in threat reduction missions for national security. Dr. Schwade currently serves on several working groups for the Director of National Intelligence. He received a Ph.D. in medical sciences

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 AppENDIX A from Texas A&M University’s Health Science Center. After a postdoctoral fellow- ship, Dr. Schwade accepted a faculty appointment at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, where he still holds an appointment as an adjunct associate professor. Dr. Schwade entered national security service in 2003 and has held several research and development management positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Schwade is a regular reviewer for the peer-reviewed programs for the Department of Defense and for several scholarly publications. He is also the author of 26 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters and is a regular contributor to the intelligence community. Ronald L. Smith is in private practice of internal medicine and is an associate clinical professor at the University of Nevada School of Medicine. He was a neurobiologist at the NASA Ames Research Center and a postdoctoral fellow at the UCLA Brain Research Institute. He currently serves on the Joint Indepen- dent Science Panel on Chemical and Biological Defense and has reviewed poli- cies, procedures, and training in troop protection from chemical, biological, and nuclear threats for the joint military services. He served on the NRC’s Committee on Network Science for Future Army Applications. Dr. Smith received a Ph.D. in anatomy (neuroscience) from the University of California at San Francisco and an M.D. from the Autonomous University of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Karen S. Walch is an associate professor and consultant at Thunderbird School of Global Management. She earned a Ph.D. in political science from the Uni- versity of Wisconsin-Madison. She has accreditation from Harvard’s Program on Negotiation; the Centre for Dispute Resolution in London; The Training Management Center, Princeton; the Hay Group, Boston; the Creativity Institute, New York; the Atwood Institute and Defensive Systems, Arizona. Dr. Walch was editor of the Conflict Resolution Series “Central America: Continuity and Change” and author of Self­Interest and Collaboration: The CBI Experience. She has published in Caribbean Affairs, the Journal of Language of International Business, the Thunderbird International Business reiew, Global Business, the Journal of Dispute resolution, and Caribbean Choices. She is also co-author of Global Negotiation and Understanding Negotiation. Dr. Walch currently serves as a researcher with an international team for a project on corporate cultures in global interaction, funded by the Bertelsmann Foundation, and a project on global mindset, initiated by the Garvin Center for Language and Culture. Alice M. Young is a professor of psychology at Texas Tech University and of pharmacology and neuroscience at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Her current research and teaching focus on behavioral and pharmacological pro- cesses that modulate tolerance to and dependence on psychoactive drugs, with particular attention to learning and memory processes, the roles of efficacy in psychoactive drug effects, and the roles of receptor activity in dependence and

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 EMErGING COGNITIVE NEUrOSCIENCE AND rELATED TECHNOLOGIES withdrawal. Before joining the Texas Tech University System in 2004, Dr. Young was a professor of psychology and of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at Wayne State University. Dr. Young is a past president of the Behavioral Phar- macology Society and past chair of the Division of Behavioral Pharmacology of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. She received a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota and post- doctoral training in pharmacology at the University of Michigan.