Appendix F
Committee Biographies

Lawrence S. Lewin, M.B.A. (Chair) founded the Lewin Group in 1970 and remained its president and chief executive officer until 1999. He has directed a wide range of projects in health policy and finance, public health, academic medicine, public and private health insurance, technology and market assessment of medical devices and pharmaceutical products, strategic visioning and planning, and health systems management and governance. He has conducted nearly 100 workshops and strategic planning conferences for a wide variety of health care executives and organizations. He left the Lewin Group in December 1999 and currently is an executive consultant assisting senior health care executives, foundations, and organizations in strategic decision making, program improvement, and executive coaching. Mr. Lewin was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1984, served 8 years as an elected member of the IOM Council, and in 2004 was awarded the IOM’s Adam Yarmolinsky Medal for Distinguished Service. He has served on several IOM committees. He was a founding member of the Association for Health Services Research (now AcademyHealth) and is currently a member of the National Commission on Prevention Priorities. Mr. Lewin holds an A.B. from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School, where he was a Baker Scholar. Mr. Lewin served as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps.


Jack Ebeler, M.P.A. (Vice Chair) is a consultant in health care policy, focusing on federal policy and the changing health care marketplace. Previously, he served as president and chief executive officer of the Alliance of Community



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Appendix F Committee Biographies Lawrence S. Lewin, M.b.A. (Chair) founded the Lewin Group in 1970 and remained its president and chief executive officer until 1999. He has directed a wide range of projects in health policy and finance, public health, aca- demic medicine, public and private health insurance, technology and mar- ket assessment of medical devices and pharmaceutical products, strategic visioning and planning, and health systems management and governance. He has conducted nearly 100 workshops and strategic planning conferences for a wide variety of health care executives and organizations. He left the Lewin Group in December 1999 and currently is an executive consultant assisting senior health care executives, foundations, and organizations in strategic decision making, program improvement, and executive coaching. Mr. Lewin was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1984, served 8 years as an elected member of the IOM Council, and in 2004 was awarded the IOM’s Adam Yarmolinsky Medal for Distinguished Service. He has served on several IOM committees. He was a founding member of the As- sociation for Health Services Research (now AcademyHealth) and is cur- rently a member of the National Commission on Prevention Priorities. Mr. Lewin holds an A.B. from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and an M.B.A. from the Harvard Busi- ness School, where he was a Baker Scholar. Mr. Lewin served as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps. Jack Ebeler, M.P.A. (Vice Chair) is a consultant in health care policy, focusing on federal policy and the changing health care marketplace. Previously, he served as president and chief executive officer of the Alliance of Community 0

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0 AMERICA’S UNINSURED CRISIS Health Plans. Prior to that, Mr. Ebeler was senior vice president and director of the health care group at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, where he focused on the uninsured, health care quality, and chronic care issues. Mr. Ebeler served as deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation for health and as acting assistant secretary for planning and evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Over the years, he has also held positions in the health care industry and on Capitol Hill. Mr. Ebeler serves as a commissioner on the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission; the Health Care Services board of the Institute of Medicine; the board of trustees of Inova Health System in Virginia, where he chairs the board of health care services; and the board of directors of Families USA. Mr. Ebeler holds an M.P.A. from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Har- vard University, and his undergraduate degree is from Dickinson College. Mr. Ebeler chaired the IOM Committee on the Review of the Adoption and Implementation of Health IT Standards of the Office of the National Coor- dinator for Health Information Technology within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He was a member of the IOM Subcommittee on Strategies and Models for Providing Health Insurance, as well as other IOM committees and planning groups. John Z. Ayanian, M.D., M.P.P., is a professor of medicine and health care policy at Harvard Medical School and professor of health policy and man- agement at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is the director of the General Internal Medicine Fellowship and medical director of the Center for Surgery and Public Health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He is also a practicing general internist in the Division of General Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he sees patients and teaches medi- cal residents. Dr. Ayanian’s research focuses on the effect of patients’ race, ethnicity, gender, insurance coverage, and socioeconomic characteristics on access to care and clinical outcomes, as well as on the impact of physicians’ specialty and organizational characteristics on the quality of care. He is the principal investigator of the Harvard/Northern California research team in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium. In Dr. Ayanian’s recent research, he has studied trends in quality of care and racial disparities in Medicare managed care plans, the effect of Medicare cover- age on previously uninsured adults, the impact of ambulatory care from primary care physicians and cardiologists on the outcomes of Medicare beneficiaries who have survived a heart attack, and the quality of cancer care by race, ethnicity, and language. Dr. Ayanian received his B.A. degree summa cum laude from Duke University, his M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School, and his M.P.P. degree from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, with a concentration in health policy. Dr. Ayanian was a member of the IOM Committee on Cancer Survivorship and the Committee

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0 APPENDIX F on the Consequences of Uninsurance. He has received numerous awards for his research. katherine baicker, Ph.D., is professor of health economics in the Depart- ment of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. She received her B.A. in economics from Yale in 1993 and her Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 1998. She is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She has served on the faculty of the Economics Department at Dartmouth College, the Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences and the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Dartmouth Medical School, and in the School of Public Af- fairs at the University of California, Los Angeles. From 2005 to 2007, Dr. Baicker served as a Senate-confirmed member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Dr. Baicker’s research interests include health econom- ics, welfare, and public finance, with a particular focus on the financing of health insurance, spending on public programs, and fiscal federalism. Her research has been published in journals such as the American Economic Re- iew, Health Affairs, Journal of Public Economics, and Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has been featured in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Business Week, and on National Public Radio. Christine Ferguson, J.D., is a research professor at the George Washington School of Public Health and Health Services. Ms. Ferguson has been en- gaged in the development of an educational program in state health policy and concentrates her research on health reform, health services for vulner- able populations, overweight and obesity, and health systems reform. From 1981 to 1995, Ms. Ferguson served as counsel and deputy chief of staff to the late U.S. Senator John H. Chafee (R-RI). In this role, Ms. Ferguson served as lead staff negotiator for the Mainstream Senators in their 1993- 1994 attempt to develop a bipartisan health reform proposal. Ferguson served as secretary of the Rhode Island Department of Human Services from 1995 to 2001, under Governor Lincoln Almonds’ two-term adminis- tration. As commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health under Governor Mitt Romney from 2003 to 2005, Ms. Ferguson led the Administration’s efforts in the areas of emergency preparedness, substance abuse services, medical errors reduction, and early childhood education and child care. Most recently, Ferguson served as president of First Focus, a special initiative funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the Atlantic Philanthropies. A graduate of the University of Michigan and the Washington College of Law at American University, Ms. Ferguson is a member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Academy of Sciences and the Board of the Neighborhood Health Plan of

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0 AMERICA’S UNINSURED CRISIS Rhode Island. She has also served in a leadership capacity at the National Academy for State Health Policy and other organizations. Robert S. galvin, M.D., M.b.A., is the director of Global Health Care for General Electric (GE). He is in charge of the design and performance of GE’s health programs, totaling over $3 billion annually, and oversees the 1 million patient encounters that take place in GE’s 220 medical clinics in more than 20 countries. Drawing on his clinical expertise and training in Six Sigma, Dr. Galvin has been an advocate and leader in extending the ben- efits of this methodology to health care. Dr. Galvin has focused on issues of market-based health policy and financing, with a special interest in quality improvement, payment reform, and the assessment of medical innovations. He was recently appointed to the National Advisory Council for Health- care Research and Quality, which provides advice and recommendations to the director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and to the Secretary of Health and Human Services on priorities for a national health services research agenda. He is also on the board of the National Committee for Quality Assurance and was a member of the Task Force on the Future of Military Health Care. He is a cofounder of the Leapfrog Group and is the founder of Bridges to Excellence, one of the first pay-for- performance initiatives. Dr. Galvin is widely published on issues affecting the purchaser side of health care, and is professor adjunct of medicine and health policy at Yale University, where he directs the seminar series on the private sector for the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars fellowship. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Dr. Galvin has served on numerous IOM committees. Paul ginsburg, Ph.D., is president of the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Founded in 1995 by Dr. Ginsburg, HSC conducts research to inform policy makers and other audiences about changes in organization of financing and delivery of care and their effects on people. HSC is widely known for the objectivity and technical quality of its research and its suc- cess in communicating it to policy makers and the media, as well as to the research community. Dr. Ginsburg is particularly known for his understand- ing of health care markets and health care costs. In 2007, for the fifth time, he was named by Modern Healthcare as one of the 100 most powerful per- sons in health care. Dr. Ginsburg served as the founding executive director of the predecessor to the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission. Widely regarded as highly influential, the commission developed the Medicare physician payment reform proposal that was enacted by the Congress in 1989. Dr. Ginsburg was a senior economist at RAND and served as deputy assistant director at the Congressional Budget Office. Before serving in that

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 APPENDIX F capacity, he served on the faculties of Duke and Michigan State Universities. Dr. Ginsburg earned his doctorate in economics from Harvard University. Leon L. Haley, Jr., M.D., M.H.S.A., FACEP, CPE, is currently the deputy chief of staff and deputy senior vice-president of medical affairs for the Grady Health System. Dr. Haley holds the additional titles of chief of ser- vice, emergency medicine for the Grady Health System, medical director of the Emergency Care Center at Grady Memorial Hospital and vice-chair- man, clinical affairs, Grady Health System and associate professor of emer- gency medicine at Emory University and The Emory Clinic. Dr. Haley has interests and publications in health administration, operations and strategic management, and diversity as it relates to health care and emergency medi- cine in particular. Dr. Haley serves on or chairs various hospital, university, and national committees including the Board of Directors for the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. He is a member of several national organizations, including the American College of Emergency Physicians, the American College of Healthcare Executives, and the American College of Physician Executives. Dr. Haley is also an oral board examiner for the American Board of Emergency Medicine. Dr. Haley is board-certified in emergency medicine and a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Dr. Haley has additionally completed the Woodruff Leadership Program at Emory University and a fellowship for the National Associa- tion of Public Hospital Program. Dr. Haley has been funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Healthcare Foundation of Georgia. Dr. Haley is a member of the State of Georgia’s Trauma Network Commission as an appointee of the Lt. Governor. A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Dr. Haley received his undergraduate degree from Brown University, his medical degree from the University of Pittsburgh, and his master’s degree in health services administration from the University of Michigan. Dr. Haley completed his residency in emergency medicine, including a year as chief resident, at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan. Prior to holding positions at Grady and Emory, Dr. Haley was a senior staff physi- cian at the Henry Ford Health System and a member of the Henry Ford Medical Group. Catherine McLaughlin, Ph.D., is a senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and the director of research for Mathematica’s new of- fice in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She is also a professor in the Department of Health Management and Policy and the director of the Economic Research Initiative on the Uninsured (ERIU) at the University of Michigan. ERIU, an initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, conducts and disseminates research aimed at increasing our understanding of the interaction between health and labor market dynamics and the uninsured.

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 AMERICA’S UNINSURED CRISIS Dr. McLaughlin is on the board of trustees of the American Hospital As- sociation’s Health Research and Educational Trust, the treasurer of the American Society of Health Economists, and a member of the Council on Health Care Economics and Policy. She is on the editorial board of Health Serices Research. Her current research interests are focused on the un- insured, managed care, market competition, and employer and employee benefit choice. She has published numerous articles including research on the working uninsured. Professor McLaughlin received her Ph.D. in eco- nomics from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. McLaughlin was appointed to the Institute of Medicine in 2006. James J. Mongan, M.D., is president and chief executive officer of Partners HealthCare System. He is also professor of health care policy and professor of social medicine at Harvard Medical School and chairs the Common- wealth Fund Commission on a High Performance Health System. From 1996-2002, Dr. Mongan served as president of Massachusetts General Hospital. Earlier in his career, Dr. Mongan was the executive director of the Truman Medical Center in Kansas City and dean of the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine. He was also staff to the Senate Committee on Finance, a deputy assistant secretary for health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and an associate director of the Carter White House domestic policy staff. Dr. Mongan is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has served on numerous boards of trust- ees, including those of the American Hospital Association and the Kaiser Family Foundation. Dr. Mongan earned his medical degree from Stanford University Medical School. He was a member of the IOM Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance and has served on the IOM Council, the Na- tional Research Council’s Governing Board, and other IOM committees. Robert D. Reischauer, Ph.D., is the president of The Urban Institute. Pre- viously, he was a senior fellow with the Brookings Institution, and from 1989 to 1995, he was the director of the Congressional Budget Office. He is vice chair of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission. He also cur- rently serves on the boards of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, AcademyHealth, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, and Harvard University (the Corporation). Dr. Reischauer is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Public Administration and is a founding member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. Dr. Reischauer received his A.B. degree from Harvard College and his M.I.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. William J. Scanlon, Ph.D., is a senior policy advisor with Health Policy R&D. He is a consultant to the National Health Policy Forum and is an

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 APPENDIX F affiliated faculty member with the Institute for Policy Studies, The Johns Hopkins University. He was the managing director of health care issues at the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) (now the U.S. Government Accountability Office) until 2004. At GAO, he oversaw congressionally requested studies of Medicare, Medicaid, the private insurance market and health delivery systems, public health, and the military and veterans’ health care systems. Prior to joining GAO in 1993, he was the co-director of the Center for Health Policy Studies and an associate professor in the Depart- ment of Family Medicine at Georgetown University. Also, Dr. Scanlon was a principal research associate in Health Policy at the Urban Institute. Currently, Dr. Scanlon is a member of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission and the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics. Dr. Scanlon has published extensively and has served as a frequent con- sultant to federal agencies, state Medicaid programs, and private founda- tions. He earned his doctoral degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Antonia villarruel, Ph.D., is professor and associate dean for research at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2007. Dr. Villarruel has an extensive background in health promotion and health disparities research and practice. Her research focuses on the development and testing of behavioral interventions to reduce HIV sexual risk behaviors among Mexican and Latino youth. Dr. Villarruel’s research integrates a community participatory approach. Dr. Villarruel is vice president and a founding member of the National Coalition of Ethnic Minority Nursing Associations and past president of the National Associa- tion of Hispanic Nurses. She was co-chair of the Diversity Working Group of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Education and Practice, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Villarruel has received nu- merous honors and awards including recognition in the Michigan Nurses Hall of Fame. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. Lawrence Wallack, Dr.P.H., is the dean of the College of Urban and Pub- lic Affairs at Portland State University and Emeritus Professor of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Wallack was a founding se- nior fellow and first President of the Rockridge Institute, a California-based think tank. He is also a senior fellow at the Longview Institute. Dr. Wallack is the founding director of the Prevention Research Center, the first feder- ally funded national alcohol research center with a primary emphasis on prevention. He is a founding director of the Berkeley Media Studies Group, an organization conducting research and training in the use of media to promote healthy public policies. Dr. Wallack is one of the primary architects of media advocacy—an innovative approach to working with mass media

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 AMERICA’S UNINSURED CRISIS to advance social and public health issues. He has published extensively and lectures frequently on the news media and public health policy issues. Dr. Wallack has been honored with several awards including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Innovators Award for lifetime achievement and innovation in the area of prevention. He earned his doctoral degree in health education from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Wallack was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance.

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