Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

David R. Franz, Co-chair, served in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for 23 of 27 years on active duty and retired as colonel. He served as Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and as Deputy Commander of the Medical Research and Materiel Command. Prior to joining the command, he served as group veterinarian for the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Dr. Franz was the chief inspector on three United Nations Special Commission biological warfare inspection missions to Iraq and served as technical advisor on long-term monitoring. He also served as a member of the first two U.S.-UK teams that visited Russia in support of the Trilateral Joint Statement on Biological Weapons and as a member of the Trilateral Experts’ Committee for biological weapons negotiations. Dr. Franz was technical editor for the Textbook of Military Medicine on Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare released in 1997. Current standing committee appointments include the Defense Intelligence Agency Red Team Bio-Chem 2020, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Threat Reduction Advisory Committee, the Department of Health and Human Services’ National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, the Sandia National Laboratories’ Distinguished Advisory Panel for international activities, and the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Advisory Committee. He serves on the boards of the Federation of American Scientists and the Kansas Bioscience Authority. Dr. Franz holds an adjunct appointment as professor for the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, and serves on the Dean’s Advisory Council. The current focus of his activities relates to the role of international engagement in the life sciences as a component of national security policy. Dr. Franz holds a D.V.M. from Kansas State University and a Ph.D. in physiology from Baylor College of Medicine.



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members David R. Franz, Co-chair, served in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for 23 of 27 years on active duty and retired as colonel. He served as Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infec - tious Diseases and as Deputy Commander of the Medical Research and Mate - riel Command. Prior to joining the command, he served as group veterinarian for the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Dr. Franz was the chief inspector on three United Nations Special Commission biological warfare inspection mis- sions to Iraq and served as technical advisor on long-term monitoring. He also served as a member of the first two U.S.-Uk teams that visited Russia in sup- port of the Trilateral Joint Statement on Biological Weapons and as a member of the Trilateral Experts’ Committee for biological weapons negotiations. Dr. Franz was technical editor for the Textbook of Military Medicine on Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare released in 1997. Current standing committee appointments include the Defense Intelligence Agency Red Team Bio-Chem 2020, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency’s Threat Reduction Advisory Committee, the Department of Health and Human Services’ National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, the Sandia National Laboratories’ Dis - tinguished Advisory Panel for international activities, and the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Advisory Committee. He serves on the boards of the Federation of American Scientists and the kansas Biosci- ence Authority. Dr. Franz holds an adjunct appointment as professor for the Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology at the College of Vet- erinary Medicine, kansas State University, and serves on the Dean’s Advisory Council. The current focus of his activities relates to the role of international engagement in the life sciences as a component of national security policy. Dr. Franz holds a D.V.M. from kansas State University and a Ph.D. in physiology from Baylor College of Medicine. 

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4 APPENDIX B Ronald F. Lehman II, Co-chair, is the director of the Center for Global Secu- rity Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and also chairman of the Governing Board of the International Science and Technology Center. He serves on the Department of Defense (DOD) Threat Reduction Advisory Committee, and served on the Defense Science Board Task Forces on Globalization and Security and on Tritium, and on the National Research Council’s Committee on Science, Technology, and Health Aspects of the For- eign Policy Agenda of the United States. In 1995, President William J. Clinton appointed him to the five-member President’s Advisory Board on Arms Prolif - eration Policy. From 1989 to 1993, he was director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Previously, he served as assistant secretary of defense for International Security Policy, Department of State’s U.S. chief negotiator on Strategic Offensive Arms, and deputy assistant to the President for National Security Affairs. He has also served as a senior director at the National Secu- rity Council (NSC), and senior professional staff of the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC). Additionally, he headed the U.S. Delegations to the Fourth Review Conference of the Nonproliferation Treaty and the Third Review Con - ference of the Biological Weapons Convention, and also served as deputy head of delegation for the Chemical Weapons Convention signing. Robert B. Barker retired from LLNL in 1999 after 30 years of service. He was a nuclear weapons designer and held several managerial positions, includ - ing assistant to the director. From 1986 to 1992, he served as assistant to the secretary of defense for Atomic Energy. Prior to this, he was deputy assistant director of the Bureau of Verification and Intelligence at the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 1983-1985. Dr. Barker also worked at the LLNL as assistant associate director for arms control, 1982-1983; special projects division leader, 1978-1982; and evaluation and planning division leader, 1973-1978. He has also served on the National Security Advisory Council. William F. Burns (U.S. Army Major General, retired) is a former director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and former commandant of the U.S. Army War College. He led the U.S. delegation on Safety, Security, and Dismantlement of nuclear weapons, serving as ambassador in negotiations on the denuclearization of the former Soviet Union. He is a distinguished fel - low at the Army War College and serves on several panels, advisory boards, and boards of trustees of governmental and nonprofit organizations. He is judge emeritus of the Court of Judicial Discipline of Pennsylvania. General Burns co-chaired a National Academies’ study on overcoming impediments to U.S.-Russian cooperation on nuclear nonproliferation and retired at the end of 2007 from the Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC).

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 APPENDIX B Rose Gottemoeller served as director of the Carnegie Moscow Center from January 2006 through December 2008. She was previously a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, specializing in arms control, nonproliferation, and nuclear security issues. From 1998 to 2000, she served in the Department of Energy as assistant secretary for nonproliferation and national security and then as deputy undersecretary for defense nuclear nonproliferation. From 1993 to 1994, she was director for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia Affairs on the NSC in the White House. Ms. Gottemoeller co- chaired a National Academies’ study on overcoming impediments to U.S.- Russian cooperation on nuclear nonproliferation and is currently a member of CISAC. john Hamre was elected president and chief executive officer of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in January 2000. Before joining CSIS, he served as the 26th U.S. deputy secretary of defense. Prior to that, from 1993 to 1997, he served as under secretary of defense (comptroller). As comptroller, he was the principal assistant to the secretary of defense for the preparation, presentation, and execution of the defense budget and manage - ment improvement programs. In 2007, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates appointed Dr. Hamre to serve as chairman of the Defense Policy Board. Before serving at DOD, Dr. Hamre worked for 10 years as a professional staff member of the SASC. During that time, he was primarily responsible for the oversight and evaluation of procurement, research, and development programs, defense budget issues, and relations with the Senate Appropriations Committee. From 1978 to 1984, Dr. Hamre served in the Congressional Budget Office, where he became its deputy assistant director for national security and international affairs. In that position, he oversaw analysis and other support for committees in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. Robert joseph is currently a senior scholar at the National Institute for Pub- lic Policy. From June 2005 to March 2007, Ambassador Joseph served as the undersecretary of state for arms control and international security. Previously, he served as special assistant to the President and senior director for prolif - eration strategy, counterproliferation, and homeland defense NSC. From 1992 until 2001, Dr. Joseph was professor of national security studies and direc - tor-founder of the Center for Counterproliferation Research at the National Defense University. Before that, he was U.S. commissioner to the Standing Consultative Commission and to the U.S.-Russian Consultative Commission on Nuclear Testing, principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for international security policy, and deputy assistant secretary for nuclear forces and arms con - trol policy. Dr. Joseph received his M.A. from the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. from Columbia University.

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 APPENDIX B Orde kittrie is a tenured professor of law at Arizona State University (ASU). Before joining the ASU law faculty in 2004, Professor kittrie spent 11 years at the Department of State, including service as the State Department’s senior attorney for nuclear affairs, as director of the office of international anticrime programs, as an attorney specializing in arms and dual-use trade controls, and as special assistant to the undersecretary for economic and business affairs. As senior attorney for nuclear affairs, he participated in negotiation of five nuclear nonproliferation agreements between the United States and Russia, served as counsel for the U.S. government’s sanctions and other responses to the 1998 Indian and Pakistani nuclear tests, and helped negotiate at the United Nations Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism. In 2005, kit- trie served as a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ committee that produced with the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) a joint report entitled Strengthening U.S.-Russian Cooperation on Nuclear Nonproliferation. kittrie currently serves as chair of the Nonproliferation, Arms Control and Disarma - ment Committee of the American Branch of the International Law Association; as chair of the Nonproliferation, Arms Control and Disarmament Committee of the American Society of International Law; as a visiting scholar at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies; and as a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations. james LeDuc directs the Program on Global Health within the Institute for Human Infections and Immunity at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He also serves as deputy director of the Galveston National Laboratory. Previ - ously he served as the Coordinator for Influenza for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, and was the director of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases in the National Center for Infec - tious Diseases (NCID), CDC. His professional career began as a field biologist working with the Smithsonian Institution’s African Mammal Project in West Africa. Following that he served for 23 years as an Officer with the United States Army Medical Research and Development Command. He joined CDC in 1992, and was assigned to the World Health Organization as a Medical Officer, later becoming the Associate Director for Global Health at NCID. His research interests include the epidemiology of arboviruses and viral hemor- rhagic fevers, and global health. He has participated in a number of National Research Council studies. Richard W. Mies (U.S. Navy Admiral, retired) is currently a private consul- tant. He was previously the president and chief executive officer of Hicks and Associates, Inc., and was concurrently the deputy group manager of the Transformation, Training, Test, and Logistics Group at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Admiral Mies joined SAIC after retiring from the U.S. Navy in February 2002 at the rank of admiral. During his military

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 APPENDIX B career, Admiral Mies served as commander in chief, United States Strategic Command, and in several senior staff positions. His many service decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Navy Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal (two awards), Legion of Merit (four awards), and National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal. Admiral Mies graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a B.S. and holds a masters’ degree in government administration and international relations and an honorary doc - torate of law degree from the University of Nebraska. judith Miller is an author and a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter formerly with the New York Times. She left the paper in November 2005, after spending 85 days in jail to defend a reporter’s right to protect confidential sources. In 2007, she joined the Manhattan Institute as an adjunct fellow and a contributing editor of the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal. She writes for several publications–the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, and New York Sun, among them. She is also a commentator for Fox News on national security, focusing on the Middle East and counterterrorism, and the need to strike a delicate balance between protecting both national security and American civil liberties in a post-9/11 world. She has reported extensively on cooperative threat reduction activities, particularly in Russia. She is the author/coauthor of four books, and in 2002, was part of a small team that won a Pulitzer Prize for explanatory journalism for her January 2001 series on Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda. That same year, she won an Emmy for her work on a Nova–New York Times documentary based on articles for her book Germs. She was also part of the Times team that won the prestigious DuPont award for a series of programs on terrorism for Public Broadcasting Service’s “Frontline.” She has a B.A. from Barnard College and an M.P.A. from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. George W. Parshall is an advisor to the U.S. Army on neutralization pro- cesses used to destroy chemical weapons instead of incineration. Now retired, he joined DuPont’s Central Research Department in 1954, where he rose to director of chemical science. He directed the work of 50 to 100 DuPont sci - entists, including that of Richard Schrock, who received the 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. He was most closely associated with the DuPont processes for making critical intermediates used in producing nylon, polyester, and spandex polymers as well as alternatives to chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants. He coau - thored the definitive textbook on “Homogeneous Catalysis.” In the 1970s, he played a role in technological exchanges with the RAS. More recently, under the Department of Defense Cooperative Threat Reduction Program, he helped assess Russian technology for the destruction of chemical weapons. Parshall is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

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 APPENDIX B Thomas Pickering (U.S. Ambassador, retired) is vice chairman of the consulting firm Hills & Company. He is the former senior vice president for international relations at the Boeing Company, a position he assumed in January 2001 upon his retirement as U.S. undersecretary of state for political affairs. Ambassador Pickering held the personal rank of career ambassador, the highest in the U.S. Foreign Service. In a diplomatic career spanning five decades, he has served as U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation, India, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria, and the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan. From 1989 to 1993, he served as ambas- sador to the United Nations. His service in the U.S. government began in 1956 in the U.S. Navy. On active duty until 1959, he later served in the Naval Reserve to the grade of lieutenant commander. Between 1959 and 1961, he served in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research of the State Department, and in the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Ambassador Pickering previously served on the National Academies’ Policy and Global Affairs Committee. kim Savit is currently a consultant for the Intelligence, Security and Technology Group of SAIC. She is also an adjunct professor at the University of Denver korbel Graduate School of International Studies. Ms. Savit retired in May 2006 from her position as the senior professional staff member for the Middle East, Central and South Asia on the Majority Staff of the United States Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Ms. Savit served in the State Department as the deputy coordinator for security and law enforcement assistance to Europe and Eurasia (Acting, 2002-2003) and as the director for security and law enforce - ment assistance to the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union (1995-2002). Ms. Savit held many positions in DOD, including director of the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program for the Office of the Secretary of Defense and country desk officer for Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Libya, Iran, and Iraq in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Near East and South Asian Affairs Bureau.