Appendix G
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Veerabhadran Ramanathan, chair, is a distinguished professor of atmospheric and climate sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. He received his Ph.D. in planetary atmospheres from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Dr. Ramanathan’s research focuses on global climate dynamics, the greenhouse effect, air pollution, and climate mitigation. A codiscoverer of the widespread South Asian atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) in the late 1990s, he has since examined the impacts of ABCs on regional climate, including decreasing rice harvests in India and heating of the atmosphere over Asia and thus contributing to the melting of Himalayan and Tibetan glaciers. He currently chairs the United Nations Environment Programme-sponsored Project ABC. Dr. Ramanathan has been part of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) since its inception, and served as one of the lead editors in the 2007 Working Group I report. He is the recipient of many national and international awards, including the Carl-Gustaf Rossby medal from the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Buys Ballot medal from the Dutch Academy of Sciences, the Volvo environment prize, and the Zayed International prize for environment. Dr. Ramanathan is a member of the American Philosophical Society, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Academia Europea, Third World Academy of Sciences, and Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.



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Appendix G Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Veerabhadran Ramanathan, chair, is a distinguished professor of atmospheric and climate sciences at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. He received his Ph.D. in planetary atmospheres from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Dr. Ramanathan’s research focuses on global climate dynamics, the greenhouse effect, air pollution, and climate mitigation. A codiscoverer of the widespread South Asian atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) in the late 1990s, he has since examined the impacts of ABCs on regional climate, including de- creasing rice harvests in India and heating of the atmosphere over Asia and thus contributing to the melting of Himalayan and Ti- betan glaciers. He currently chairs the United Nations Environment Programme-sponsored Project ABC. Dr. Ramanathan has been part of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) since its inception, and served as one of the lead editors in the 2007 Working Group I report. He is the recipient of many national and international awards, including the Carl-Gustaf Rossby medal from the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Buys Ballot medal from the Dutch Academy of Sciences, the Volvo environment prize, and the Zayed International prize for environment. Dr. Ramanathan is a member of the American Phi- losophical Society, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Academia Europea, Third World Academy of Sciences, and Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. 243

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244 APPENDIX G Christopher O. Justice, vice chair, is director of research and a professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Maryland. He holds a Ph.D. in geography from Reading University (UK). Dr. Justice has research interests in global environmental change, land-use and land-cover change, remote sensing, satellite- based fire monitoring, and terrestrial observing systems. He is the project scientist for NASA’s Land Cover and Land Use Change Program and the Fire Implementation Team Leader for the Global Observation of Forest Cover project. He is also responsible for developing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer fire product and rapid response system, a decision-making tool for resource managers. Dr. Justice is a former member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committee on Earth Studies. He is a current member of the Integrated Global Observation of Land theme and is leading the Group on Earth Observation Task on Global Agricultural Monitoring. John B. Carberry recently retired as Director of Environmental Technology for the DuPont Company. At DuPont, he was respon- sible for analysis and recommendations for technical programs and product development for DuPont based on environmental issues. He led that technology function to provide excellence in treatment and remediation while in a transition to excellence in waste pre- vention, product stewardship and sustainability. Mr. Carberry presently consults (Carberry EnviroTech) on product and process strategies for dealing with the environmental issues of energy, re- newable energy, sustainability, and nanomaterials. He is also an adjunct professor at both Cornell University and the University of Delaware. Mr. Carberry is a founding member of the Green Power Market Development Group. He recently chaired the NRC Commit- tee on the Destruction of the Non-Stockpile Chemical Weapons, and served on six previous committees. He holds a B.ChE. and an M.E. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University, an M.B.A. from the University of Delaware, and is a Registered Professional Engi- neer (Chemical). Robert E. Dickinson is a professor in the Jackson School of Geo- sciences of the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr.

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APPENDIX G 245 Dickinson’s research interests are in climate modeling, global change research, natural and anthropogenic forcing of climate variations, and land–atmosphere interactions in large-scale models. Dr. Dickinson has received a number of awards for his work in these areas, including the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU’s) Roger Revelle Medal and the AMS Rossby Award, Jule G. Char- ney Award, and Meisinger Award. He has participated in a number of climate-related committees, including the Climate Variability and Predictability Programme, the International Global Carbon Project (of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, International Human Dimensions Programme, and World Climate Research Programme), and the NRC Committee on the Science of Climate Change. Dr. Dickinson is past president of the AGU, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Sciences. Eileen E. Hofmann is a professor in the Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a member of the Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography at Old Dominion University. She received her Ph.D. in marine sciences and engineering from North Carolina State University in 1980. Her research interests are in physical-biological interactions in marine ecosystems, climate con- trol of diseases of marine shellfish populations, descriptive physical oceanography, and mathematical modeling of marine ecosystems. Dr. Hofmann has worked in a variety of marine environments, the most recent being the continental shelf region off the western Ant- arctic Peninsula. She currently coordinates the Southern Ocean Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (SO GLOBEC) synthesis and integration effort and is an ex-officio member of the U.S. and Inter- national GLOBEC science steering committees. Dr. Hofmann has served on a number of NRC committees concerned with oceanogra- phy and ecology, including the Ocean Studies Board, the Committee on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries, and the Ecology Panel. She also brings expertise in evaluating research progress, having recently served on the NRC Committee on Metrics for Global Change Research. James W. Hurrell is a Senior Scientist in and former Director of the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at the National Center

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246 APPENDIX G for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Although most of his profes- sional career has been at NCAR, he spent a year as a visiting scientist at the UK Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Re- search. Dr. Hurrell received his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from Purdue University. His research has centered on empirical and modeling studies and diagnostic analyses to better understand cli- mate, climate variability, and climate change. Dr. Hurrell has served on many national and international science planning efforts and is currently cochair of the Scientific Steering Group of the World Climate Research Programme on Climate Variability and Predictability. He has been extensively involved in assessment ac- tivities of the IPCC and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP). He serves on the Council of the AMS, and is an AMS Fellow and recipient of the Society’s Clarence Leroy Meisinger Award. Jeanine A. Jones is a principal engineer and interstate resources manager at the California Department of Water Resources. She received her M.S. in civil engineering from the California State University, Sacramento, and is a registered civil engineer in Cali- fornia and Nevada. Ms. Jones was responsible for preparation of the 1998 update of the California Water Plan, the 2000 Governor’s Advisory Drought Planning Panel report, and the 2008 California Drought Update report. She also participated in negotiations for the 2003 Colorado River Quantification Settlement Agreement and related agreements with relevant states and local agencies, and cur- rently participates in the ongoing Colorado River Basin States discussions and Border Governors’ Conference Water Worktable. Her statewide planning and drought management responsibilities included actions to inform the public about California drought vul- nerability and to mitigate its effects. Such actions require the collection and analysis of regional data on parameters of interest to the CCSP, including land use, water use, water supply, and sur- face- and groundwater hydrology. Ms. Jones has served on the Colorado River Board of California and on a variety of committees of the Western States Water Council. She was also a governor’s liai- son to the Western Water Policy Review Advisory Commission.

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APPENDIX G 247 Roger E. Kasperson is a research professor and distinguished sci- entist at Clark University. While at Clark University, he was also executive director of the Stockholm Environment Institute from 2000 to 2004. He holds a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Chicago. He has written widely on issues connected with risk analysis and communication, global environmental change, and environmental policy. Dr. Kasperson has served as a consultant or adviser to federal agencies and private entities on energy and envi- ronmental issues. Notable committee appointments include the Potsdam Institute of Climate Change Research Science Advisory Board, the UK Tyndall Institute for Climate Change Scientific Ad- visory Committee, Environmental Protection Agency Advisory Board, NRC Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change, and jury for the Volvo Environment Prize. He has been honored for his hazards research by the Association of American Geographers and was made a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Society for Risk Analysis for his contributions to the field of risk analysis. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Charles D. Kolstad is a professor of environmental economics and policy at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he holds joint appointments in the Bren School of Environmental Sci- ence and Management and the Department of Economics. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford in 1982. Dr. Kolstad’s research interests are in environmental and natural resource economics, with a focus on environmental regulation and valuation. He is ac- tively engaged in the economics of climate change and has a longstanding interest in energy markets. He was a participant in the U.S.-EU High-Level Transatlantic Dialogue on Climate Change in 2005 and is a lead author in the most recent assessment of the IPCC. Dr. Kolstad has been a member of several NRC committees concerned with climate, energy, and measuring pro- gram performance, including the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan, the Com- mittee on Building a Long-Term Environmental Quality Research and Development Program in the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems.

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248 APPENDIX G Maria Carmen Lemos is an associate professor of natural re- sources and environment at the University of Michigan and a senior policy analyst at the Udall Center for Studies of Public Pol- icy at the University of Arizona. From 2006 to 2007 she was a James Martin Fellow at the Environmental Change Institute at Ox- ford University. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research interests fo- cus on the human dimensions of global climate change, especially concerning the use of technical and scientific knowledge in cli- mate-related policy and adaptation in less developed countries, the impact of technocratic decision making on democracy and equity, and natural resources (especially water) governance. Dr. Lemos has contributed to a number of national and international efforts related to climate change, including the IPCC Fourth Assessment (chapter on industry, settlement, and society) and CCSP syntheses and assessments on decision support experiments and evaluations using seasonal-to-interannual forecasts and observational data. She is a member of the Inter-American Institute for Global Change Re- search scientific advisory committee. Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli is professor of physical oceanography in the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is also director of the Joint Program in Oceanography and Ocean Engineering be- tween MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Dr. Malanotte-Rizzoli received her first Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Padua (Italy) and her second Ph.D. in physical oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanogra- phy. Her research interests are in modeling ocean circulation in specific basins and coastal seas; constraining ocean models with observations; modeling the Black Sea ecosystem; and studying tropical–subtropical interactions in the tropical Atlantic with em- phasis on coupled ocean–atmosphere modes of variability. She also has practical interests in mitigating the impact of sea level rise and has been consulting on the project to build tidal gates in the Venice lagoon since 1995. She is a former president of the Interna- tional Association for the Physical Sciences of the Oceans, a former member of the University Corporation for Atmospheric

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APPENDIX G 249 Research Board of Trustees, and a former member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for the Geosciences. She is a current member of the NRC Panel on Climate Variability and Change. She is a fellow of the AGU and the AMS. Ellen S. Mosley-Thompson is a professor of climatology and at- mospheric science in the Department of Geography, and a senior research scientist at the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University. She holds a Ph.D. in atmospheric science (geography) from Ohio State. Her research focuses on paleoclimate reconstruc- tions from chemical and physical properties preserved in ice cores collected from Antarctica, Greenland, China, Africa, and South America. Dr. Mosley-Thompson has served on a number of NRC committees concerned with climate and polar regions, including the Committee on Glaciology, the Polar Research Board, and the Board on Global Change. She is a fellow of AAAS and a member of that association’s steering group for geology and geography. Aristides A.N. Patrinos is president of Synthetic Genomics. He received a diploma in mechanical and electrical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens and a Ph.D. degree in mechanical and astronautical sciences from Northwestern Univer- sity. Following a brief research career, he joined DOE in 1988, where he led the development of DOE’s program in global envi- ronmental change. From 1995 to 2006, he was the associate director for biological and environmental research in DOE’s Office of Science, where he oversaw research activities in the human and microbial genome, structural biology, nuclear medicine, and global environmental change. He also directed the DOE component of the U.S. Human Genome Project and was the DOE representative to the CCSP and the Climate Change Technology Program. Dr. Pa- trinos is the recipient of numerous awards and honorary degrees, including three presidential rank awards for meritorious and dis- tinguished service and two secretary of energy gold medals. He is a fellow of the AAAS and the AMS, and a member of the Ameri- can Society of Mechanical Engineers and the AGU. Guido D. Salvucci is a professor and chair of the Department of Earth Sciences and a professor in the Department of Geography

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250 APPENDIX G and Environment at Boston University. He received his Ph.D. in hydrology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on coupled atmospheric water and energy balance processes, vadose zone hydrology, stochastic hydrology, and esti- mation of evapotranspiration and the water budget at large spatial scales through remote sensing. Dr. Salvucci has been active on hydrology committees and workshops, including the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science’s Standing Committee on Hydrologic Science, the NRC Committee to Review the GAPP Science and Implementation Plan, the Sci- ence Steering Group for the NASA Water Cycle Initiative, and the NRC Workshop on Groundwater Fluxes Across Interfaces. He is currently an editor of the Journal of Hydrometeorology. He is a recipient of the AGU’s James B. Macelwane Medal and is also a fellow of that society. Susan E. Trumbore is a professor in the Department of Earth System Science and at the University of California, Irvine. She received her Ph.D. in geochemistry from Columbia University. Her research interests are in the application of isotopes and tracers to problems in ecology, soil biogeochemistry, and terrestrial car- bon cycling. Dr. Trumbore was an author of the IPCC report on land use, land-use change, and forestry. In addition to her teaching and scientific pursuits, she is interested in the evaluation of re- search programs and served on the NRC Committee on Metrics for Global Change Research. She is a fellow of the AAAS and presi- dent-elect of the AAAS Geography and Geology section. She is a fellow of the AGU and a former president of AGU's biogeochem- istry section. She is a member of the Max Planck Society and will assume a directorship at the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochem- istry, in Jena, Germany. T. Stephen Wittrig is director of advanced technologies at BP. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Wittrig is responsible for BP’s aca- demic and external technology programs in Russia and China. His current work focuses on developing a long-term technology strat- egy for BP, emphasizing clean energy technologies (solar, wind, hydrogen, and combined-cycle gas-turbine power generation) and

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APPENDIX G 251 techniques for sequestering CO2 in depleted oil reserves. In previ- ous positions at Amoco, he helped develop strategies for converting gas to liquids and oxygenates and for implementing chemical technologies, managed the engineering and process evaluation group for new chemical products development, and led a team to develop new reactor technology for converting methane to syngas. Dr. Wittrig was a member of the NRC committee that reviewed the CCSP strategic plan in 2004.

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