Appendix F
Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers

THE HONORABLE DENNIS BLAIR1

Admiral Dennis C. Blair became the nation’s third director of national intelligence on January 29, 2009.

Prior to retiring in 2002, Admiral Blair served as commander in chief, U.S. Pacific Command, the largest of the combatant commands. During his 34-year Navy career, Admiral Blair served on guided missile destroyers in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets and commanded the Kitty Hawk Battle Group. Ashore, he served as director of the Joint Staff and as the first associate director of Central Intelligence for Military Support at the CIA. He has also served in budget and policy positions on the National Security Council and on several major Navy staffs.

From 2003 to 2006, Admiral Blair was president and CEO of the Institute for Defense Analyses, one of the nation’s foremost national security analysis centers. Most recently, he served as the John M. Shalikashvili Chair in National Security Studies at the National Bureau of Asian Research, and as the deputy director of the Project on National Security Reform, an organization that analyzes the U.S. national security structure and develops recommendations to improve its effectiveness.

A 1968 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Admiral Blair earned a master’s degree in history and languages from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, and he served as a White House Fellow at the Department of Housing and Urban

1

Information obtained from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence website on May 5, 2009; see http://www.dni.gov/blair_bio.htm.



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Appendix F Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers THE HONORAbLE DENNIS bLAIR1 Admiral Dennis C. Blair became the nation’s third director of national intel- ligence on January 29, 2009. Prior to retiring in 2002, Admiral Blair served as commander in chief, U.S. Pacific Command, the largest of the combatant commands. During his 34-year Navy career, Admiral Blair served on guided missile destroyers in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets and commanded the kitty Hawk Battle Group. Ashore, he served as director of the Joint Staff and as the first associate director of Central Intelligence for Military Support at the CIA. He has also served in budget and policy positions on the National Security Council and on several major Navy staffs. From 2003 to 2006, Admiral Blair was president and CEO of the Institute for Defense Analyses, one of the nation’s foremost national security analysis centers. Most recently, he served as the John M. Shalikashvili Chair in National Security Studies at the National Bureau of Asian Research, and as the deputy director of the Project on National Security Reform, an organization that analyzes the U.S. national security structure and develops recommendations to improve its effectiveness. A 1968 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Admiral Blair earned a master’s degree in history and languages from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, and he served as a White House Fellow at the Department of Housing and Urban 1 Information obtained from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence website on May 5, 2009; see http://www.dni.gov/blair_bio.htm. 

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 AVOIDING TECHNOLOGY SURPRISE FOR TOMORROW’S WARFIGHTER Development. He has been awarded four Defense Distinguished Service Med - als and has received decorations from the governments of Japan, Thailand, the Republic of korea, and Australia. THE HONORAbLE jACquES gANSLER2 Dr. Jacques S. Gansler, director of the Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise and former Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics, is the first holder of the Roger C. Lipitz Chair in Public Policy and Private Enterprise. As the third ranking civilian at the Pentagon from 1997 to 2001, Professor Gansler was responsible for all research and development, acquisition reform, logistics, advanced technology, environmental security, defense industry, and numerous other security programs. Before joining the Clinton Administra - tion, Dr. Gansler held a variety of positions in government and the private sector, including deputy assistant secretary of defense (material acquisition), assistant director of defense research and engineering (electronics), vice president of ITT, and engineering and management positions with Singer and Raytheon Corpora - tions. Throughout his career, Dr. Gansler has written, published, and taught on subjects related to his work. He is the author of Defense Conersion: Transforming the Arsenal of Democracy, MIT Press, 1995; Affording Defense, MIT Press, 1989; and The Defense Industry, MIT Press, 1980. He has published numerous articles in Foreign Affairs, Harard Business Reiew, International Security, Public Affairs, and other journals as well as in newspapers and has provided frequent testimonies to Congress. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. MR. RObERT HEgSTROM Mr. Robert R. Hegstrom is the director of the Battlespace Awareness Portfolio within the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence, OUSD(I). In this position, he monitors, plans, and evaluates current and future intelligence programs, and he supports the undersecretary in the oversight of DOD intelligence capabilities. Mr. Hegstrom began his career in 1989 as an intelligence analyst at the For- eign Technology Division (Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio). He published dozens of assessments on foreign space and ballistic missile capabilities. From 1996 to 2003, he worked at the Space Warfare Center (Schriever AFB, Colorado), first as the technical coordinator for modeling and simulation, and later as chief of the 25-person Wargaming and Simulation Branch. He was responsible for developing and executing the Space Warfare Center’s strategic plan for modeling 2Information obtained from the University of Maryland’s website on May 5, 2009; see http://www. publicpolicy.umd.edu/facstaff/faculty/gansler.html.

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 APPENDIX F and simulation (M&S) support for DOD exercises, experiments, and wargames. He was also the game director for the highly successful Schriever 2001 wargame, the Air Force’s first wargame with space as its focus. Following senior service school at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces (ICAF) in 2003, Mr. Hegstrom completed a 30-month cross-functional assign - ment at the Pentagon including rotations in OSD/PA&E as a program analyst, the Joint Staff as a senior intelligence officer, and OUSD(I) as the deputy director for national collection programs. He also served as the deputy for the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) team in the 2005 Quadrennial Defense Review. From 2006 to 2008, Mr. Hegstrom was the senior advisor for program analysis and evaluation within OUSD(I). He assumed his current position in August 2008. Mr. Hegstrom is the recipient of a number of professional awards including the Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service. He received a B.S. in electrical systems engineering, an M.S. in electrical engineering, and an M.S. in national resource strategy.

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