Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Delores M. Etter (NAE), Co-chair, joined the electrical engineering faculty at Southern Methodist University on June 2, 2008. She holds the Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair in Engineering Education and is director of the Caruth Institute for Engineering Education. Her research interests include digital signal processing and biometric signal processing, with an emphasis on identification using iris recognition. She has written a number of textbooks on computer languages and software engineering. Dr. Etter previously held the Office of Naval Research Distinguished Chair in the electrical/computer engineering department at the U.S. Naval Academy, where she was a faculty member from 2001 to 2008. She was formerly a member of the electrical/computer engineering departments at the University of Colorado, Boulder (1990-1998), and the University of New Mexico (1980-1989). She was also a visiting professor in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University (1983-1984). Dr. Etter has held two senior executive positions in the Department of Defense. As assistant secretary of the navy for research, development, and acquisition (2005-2007), Dr. Etter was the senior acquisition executive for the Navy and the Marine Corps. She also served as the deputy under secretary of defense for science and technology (1998-2001). Dr. Etter is a former member of the National Science Board and the Defense Science Board. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Society for Engineering Education. Dr. Etter has received the Department of the Navy’s Distinguished Public Service Award, the Secretary of Defense’s Outstanding Public Service Medal, and the Department of Defense’s Distinguished Public Service Medal.


Robert J. Hermann (NAE), Co-chair, is a senior partner at Global Technology Partners, LLC. He retired as senior vice president for science and technology of United Technologies Corporation in March 1998. He is a former director of the Defense Department’s National Reconnaissance Office and a former senior official at the National Security Agency. Dr. Hermann served as a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board during the Clinton administration. At United Technologies he was responsible for assuring the development of technical resources and full exploitation of science and technology. He was also responsible for the United Technologies research center. Dr. Hermann joined the company



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Delores M. Etter (NAE), Co-chair, joined the electrical engineering faculty at Southern Methodist University on June 2, 2008. She holds the Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair in Engineering Edu- cation and is director of the Caruth Institute for Engineering Education. Her research interests include digital signal processing and biometric signal processing, with an emphasis on identification using iris recognition. She has written a number of textbooks on computer languages and software engineering. Dr. Etter previously held the Office of Naval Research Distinguished Chair in the electrical/computer engineering department at the U.S. Naval Academy, where she was a faculty member from 2001 to 2008. She was formerly a member of the electrical/computer engineering departments at the University of Colorado, Boulder (1990-1998), and the University of New Mexico (1980-1989). She was also a visit- ing professor in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University (1983-1984). Dr. Etter has held two senior executive positions in the Department of Defense. As assistant secretary of the navy for research, development, and acquisition (2005-2007), Dr. Etter was the senior acquisition executive for the Navy and the Marine Corps. She also served as the deputy under secretary of defense for science and technology (1998-2001). Dr. Etter is a former member of the National Science Board and the Defense Science Board. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Society for Engineering Education. Dr. Etter has received the Department of the Navy’s Distinguished Public Service Award, the Secretary of Defense’s Outstanding Public Service Medal, and the Department of Defense’s Distinguished Public Service Medal. Robert J. Hermann (NAE), Co-chair, is a senior partner at Global Technology Partners, LLC. He retired as senior vice president for science and technology of United Technologies Corporation in March 1998. He is a former director of the Defense Department’s National Reconnaissance Office and a former senior official at the National Security Agency. Dr. Hermann served as a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board during the Clinton administration. At United Technologies he was respon- sible for assuring the development of technical resources and full exploitation of science and technology. He was also responsible for the United Technologies research center. Dr. Hermann joined the company 

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 THE RISE OF GAMES AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR MODELING AND SIMULATION in 1982 as vice-president of systems technology in the electronics sector and later served in a series of assignments in the defense and space systems groups prior to being named vice-president of science and technology. Dr. Hermann concluded his tenure as immediate past chairman of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Board of Directors at the end of 2002 following a two-year term; he had served as chairman of the ANSI Board of Directors during 1999-2000 and as a member of the ANSI board since 1993. Dr. Hermann continues to serve as a senior partner of Global Technology Partners, LLC, which specializes in investments in technology, defense, aerospace, and related businesses worldwide. Prior to joining UTC, Dr. Hermann served 20 years with the National Security Agency, with assign- ments in research and development, operations, and NATO. In 1977 he was appointed principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for communications, command, control, and intelligence. In 1979 he was named assistant secretary of the Air Force for research, development, and logistics and in parallel was director of the National Reconnaissance Office. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Iowa State University. Dr. Hermann was chosen for this committee for his expertise in military applications and the intelligence community. Brian Ballard is the chief technology officer of Ares Systems Group, where he is involved in the development of emerging networking and embedded systems technologies for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems and applications in government and military. He is a highly experienced professional in the field of national intelligence systems and computer engineering. Employed for more than 10 years with the National Security Agency (NSA), Mr. Ballard has dealt with all forms of data collection, dissemination, processing, and visualization. As a field operations officer at the NSA, he was a member and team leader in the Office of Target Reconnaissance and Surveillance. He also worked for five years as a global network vulnerabilities analyst. Mr. Ballard holds an M.S. in electrical and computer engineering and a B.S. in electrical and computer engineering from Carnegie Mellon Univer- sity. He is currently studying for an M.S. in technology management and an M.B.A. at the University of Maryland, College Park. Pierre Chao is founder and managing partner at Renaissance Strategic Advisors. He is also a senior associate nonresident at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Previously he was a senior fellow and director of defense-industrial initiatives at CSIS from 2003 to 2007. Prior to joining CSIS, Mr. Chao was a managing director and senior aerospace/defense analyst at Credit Suisse First Boston (1999-2003), where he was responsible for following the U.S. and global aerospace/defense industry. From 1995 to 1999 he was senior aerospace/defense analyst at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter. He also served as senior industry analyst at Smith Barney in 1994 and as a director at JSA International, a management consulting firm focused on the aerospace/defense industry. Mr. Chao was also a co-founder of JSA Research, an equity research boutique specializing in the aerospace/defense industry. In 1988- 1990 he worked for Prudential-Bache Capital Funding as a mergers and acquisitions banker focusing on aerospace/defense. In 2000, Mr. Chao was appointed to the Presidential Commission on Offsets in International Trade. He is also a guest lecturer at the National Defense University and the Defense Acquisition University. He earned dual bachelor of science degrees in political science and management science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Robert gehorsam is president of Forterra Systems, Inc., and has more than 25 years of management experience in the online games and entertainment world. In recent years he has applied his experience to leveraging commercial games technology for national security and enterprise applications. Mr. Gehorsam has participated in several government studies on this subject and speaks frequently on the topic. Before

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 APPENDIX A joining Forterra Systems, he served as senior vice president of programming and production at Viacom’s CBS Internet Group and previously as senior vice president for programming and production at Sony Online Entertainment. From 1985 to 1992 he founded and led Prodigy’s games and educational divi- sions, launching the first large-scale subscription-based sports simulations and nearly two dozen other online titles. He has held management positions at Scholastic Inc. and has consulted on entertainment and broadband strategy for Microsoft, America Online, CNET, ziff-Davis, and Children’s Television Workshop. Earlier in his career he was an editor at Simon & Schuster, where he helped found its elec- tronic publishing division. Sharon C. glotzer is the Stuart W. Churchill collegiate professor of chemical engineering and a pro- fessor of materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and director of research computing in the College of Engineering. She also holds faculty appointments in physics, applied physics, and macromolecular science and engineering. She received a B.S. in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in physics from Boston University. Earlier she worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Her research focuses on computational nanoscience and simulation of soft matter, self-assembly and materials design, and computational science and engineering and is sponsored by the Department of Defense, Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the J. S. McDonnell Foundation. Dr. Glotzer is a fellow of the American Physical Society. In 2009 she was awarded a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship from the Department of Defense that provides substantial long-term funding for her research. She has served on the National Academies’ Solid State Sciences Committee; the Technology Warning and Surprise Study Committee; the Biomolecular Materials and Processes Study Committee; and the Standing Committee on Technology Insight—Gauge, Evaluate, and Review. She is involved in roadmapping activities on computational science and engineering, including chairing a pan-agency- sponsored/international assessment of research and development in simulation-based engineering and science (SBE&S), and co-chairing a research directions roadmapping effort in SBE&S for NSF. She is also co-founding director of a new Virtual School of Computational Science and Engineering under the auspices of the NSF-funded Blue Waters Petascale Computing Project at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. J. C. Herz is a technologist with a background in biological systems and computer games design. Her specialty is massively multiplayer systems that leverage social network effects, whether on the Web, mobile devices, or exotic high-end or grubby low-end hardware. She currently serves as a White House special consultant to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD). Her current and past defense projects range from aerospace systems to a computer-game-derived interface for next-generation unmanned air systems. Ms. Herz is one of three coauthors of OSD’s open technology development roadmap. She serves on the Federal Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation’s education directorate. In that capacity she is helping NSF harness emerging technologies to drive U.S. competitiveness in math and science. She was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on IT and Creative Practice and is currently a fellow of Columbia University’s American Assembly, where she is on the leadership team of the assembly’s Next Generation Project. In 2002 she was designated a Global Leader for Tomor- row by the World Economic Forum. She is a member of the Global Business Network and is a founding member of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers Task Force on Game Technologies. Ms. Herz is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and is on the advisory board of Carnegie Mellon’s ETC Press. She graduated from Harvard University with a B.A. in biology and environmen- tal studies, magna cum laude, in 1993. She is the author of two books, Surfing on the Internet (Little

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 THE RISE OF GAMES AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR MODELING AND SIMULATION Brown, 1994) and Joystick Nation: How Videogames Ate Our Quarters, Won Our Hearts, and Rewired Our Minds (Little Brown, 1997). As a New York Times columnist, Ms. Herz published 100 essays on the grammar and syntax of game design from 1998 to 2000. She has also contributed to Esther Dyson’s Release .0, Rolling Stone, Wired, GQ, and the Calgary Philatelist. Allison A. Hickey is an executive strategic planner with Accenture National Security Services (ANSS) and is currently completing service as an advisor to the Defense Science Board for Joint Net Centric Interoperability. She has over 28 years of experience in government, military, and intelligence sectors at national, department, state, and agency levels, including 16 years of “inside the beltway” force struc- ture, policy, and strategy assessment leadership. Brig. Gen. (Ret.) Hickey specializes in cross-cutting, multicultural, and multilevel leadership and management, strategic planning, and policy formulation and deployment. She has extensive experience in sensitive and high-impact research; war gaming and simulation models; corporate programming and budgeting processes; operational and personnel readiness issues resolution; business process reengineering; human capital management strategies; and identifica- tion, development, and assessment of new technology requirements. Prior to working with ANSS, she served in the Air Force for 27 years. After 10 years as an Air Force pilot and aircraft commander, she spent her last 15 years in positions that provided advice to chief executive officer levels on analysis and assessment of plans through enterprise-wide war gaming and simulation. She led the development and execution of the Air Force’s Title 10 war game, Futures Game (the first to use distributed gaming teams), which assessed the long-range investment potential of many new technologies under different political constraints. Her years of routine engagement with a wide variety of security, intelligence and military agencies, and the press have resulted in extensive knowledge of media and legislative affairs. She serves on the U.S. Air Force Academy’s Association of Graduates Board of Directors and is an advisor to the AcademyWomen’s Board of Directors. Charles Hudson is vice president for business development at Serious Business, a leading developer of social games for social networks. Previously, he was senior director for business development at Gaia Interactive, a social networking and gaming Web site marketed to teenagers. Before joining Gaia, Mr. Hudson was a product manager for IronPort Systems, a leading provider of antispam hardware appli- ances that was acquired by Cisco Systems for $830 million in 2007. He then worked in New Business Development at Google, where he focused on new partnership opportunities for early-stage products in the advertising, mobile, and e-commerce markets. He spent several years working at In-Q-Tel, a stra- tegic venture capital group for the Central Intelligence Agency. At In-Q-Tel he focused on identifying investment opportunities that could deliver significant value to the CIA and the commercial market in both the short term and long term. Mr. Hudson holds an M.B.A. from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and a B.A. in economics and Spanish from Stanford University. James Peery is director of the Computation, Computers, Information, and Mathematics Center at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In this role he is responsible for research and development activities in high-performance computing. This center contains the Computer Science Research Institute and the Institute for Advanced Architectures and Algorithms. In addition, Dr. Peery is program director of the National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program at Sandia. Dr. Peery is also chair of the Computer and Informational Science Research Foundation and the Enable Predictive Simulation Laboratory Directed Research and Develop- ment Committee. Prior to returning to Sandia, Dr. Peery worked at Los Alamos National Laboratories in the positions of hydrodynamic experiments division leader, principal deputy associate director of the

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 APPENDIX A nuclear weapons program, and program director of (NNSA’s ASC Program. Before joining Los Alamos National Laboratory, he worked at Sandia National Laboratories where he led the computational solid mechanics and structural dynamics department and computation physics department. During his career, Dr. Peery has been responsible for the development of state-of-the-art, massively parallel computational tools in the fields of high-energy density physics, shock physics, transient dynamics, quasi-statics, non- linear implicit dynamics, and structural dynamics. His major research areas are in Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian algorithms and parallel algorithms, on which he has published over 50 papers. As part of the SALINAS team, he was awarded the 2002 Gordon Bell Award and NNSA Award for Excellence. Dr. Peery earned his Ph.D. degree in nuclear engineering from Texas A&M University and joined Sandia National Laboratories as a member of the technical staff in 1990. Benjamin Sawyer is co-founder of and gaming developer for Digitalmill, a games consulting firm in Portland, Maine. Mr. Sawyer has been involved in game development for over 10 years. He is also co- founder of the Serious Games Initiative (www.seriousgames.org) with the U.S. government’s Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. Founded in 2002, the initiative is one of the leading voices and organizers in the serious games field. In 2003, Mr. Sawyer started the first Serious Games Summit, a conference that now regularly attracts 300 to 500 attendees to discuss the latest best practices. In 2003 he co-founded the Games for Health Project, now the leading gathering of health care professionals, researchers, and game developers focused on creating health games and game simulations. As a developer, Mr. Sawyer has worked on over a dozen major serious game projects. He has been a designer, producer, advisor, or manager on projects for Cisco, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Office of Naval Research, Leimandt Foundation, Cadbury, the U.S. Agency for International Development, Lockheed Martin, and several other Fortune 500 organizations. Digitalmill’s work devel- oping and advising serious game projects has been quite varied, including projects concerning command and control, education, advertising, training, and international development. Mr. Sawyer attended Baruch College in New york City but left short of his degree to pursue pressing professional offers. Ethan Watrall is an assistant professor at Matrix: The Center for Humane Arts, Letters & Social Sci- ences Online; an assistant professor in the Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media; and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of History at Michigan State University. In addition, he is a principal investigator in the Games for Entertainment & Learning Lab and co-founder of both the undergraduate specialization and game design development and the M.A. in serious game design at Michigan State University. Dr. Watrall’s primary area of research is in the domain of cultural heritage informatics, specifically serious games for cultural heritage learning, outreach, and engagement. At Michigan State University, Dr. Watrall teaches in a wide variety of areas, including cultural heritage informatics, user-centered and user experience design, game design, serious game design, game studies, social history of popular culture, and ancient Egyptian social history and archaology. Michael J. Zyda is director of the University of Southern California’s GamePipe Laboratory and a pro- fessor of engineering practice in the Department of Computer Science. At USC he created the B.S. in computer science (games) and M.S. in computer science (game development) cross-disciplinary degree programs and doubled the incoming undergraduate enrollment of the computer science department. From 2000 to 2004 he was founding director of the MOVES Institute at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and a professor in the school’s Department of Computer Science. From 1986 until the founding of the MOVES Institute, he was director of the NPSNET Research Group. Professor zyda’s research interests include computer graphics; large-scale, networked, three-dimensional virtual

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0 THE RISE OF GAMES AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR MODELING AND SIMULATION environments; agent-based simulation; modeling human and organizational behavior; interactive com- puter-generated stories; computer-generated characters; video production; entertainment/defense col- laboration; modeling and simulation; and serious and entertainment games. He is a pioneer in the fields of computer graphics, networked virtual environments, modeling and simulation, and serious games. He holds a lifetime appointment as a national associate of the National Academies, an appointment made by the Council of the National Academy of Sciences in November 2003 in recognition of extraordinary service to the Academies.