Click for next page ( 10


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 9
9 APPENDIX H Tool Design Process Example

OCR for page 9
10 Mixture Input (Temperature and Volume, Weight or Mole Fraction) Raoult's Law Conversion of Volume, Weight and Mole Estimate Viscosity, Diffusion Fraction Coefficients xlUNIFAC Evaluation Yes No Module 1 xlUNIFAC Module 2 or 3 Reiteration Between mixture and Water till Presence of Cosolvents Yes No Fi , mw , n+1 - F i , mw , n 100 5% Module 2 Module 3 Fi , mw , n Cosolvency-Log K ow Raoult's Model Law Output of Mixture and Component Properties Emergency Fate & Transport Response Model (HSA Color Coding Export for other Applications Guidance Screening Model) Upgrade Regulator Fate Model Equipment Decision Final Tool Design Flow Chart for Mixture Properties Two examples are provided to elucidate the tool design process for the fate and transport properties of an input mixture as well as its components. One is for the Module 1 through a synthetic gasoline as a mixture example and the other is for Module 2 and 3 through a mixture of alcohols and chlorinated solvents. These design processes are hidden in the final tool and not formatted. In addition, emergency response guidance, HSA screening model, and the color-coding processes are not discussed in these two examples (details refer to the descriptions in the report for each section). The tool is designed to run the input mixture as a pseudo component NAPL. In order to compare the component properties in a mixture to its pure phase, the tool will also run each individual component as a 100% input. Shown below are the output table of the mixture and the pure components. Clearly, there are many calculation worksheets to obtain these final output tables. The number of the calculation step depends on the input mixture properties. Each step is provided below with notes of the calculation process beneath the tables (Equations are provided in the report).

OCR for page 9
11 Example 1. Synthetic Gasoline The mixture components and the mass fractions are shown in the Input Interface below. Mixture Input Interface of Example 1.

OCR for page 9
12 Output Table of Example 1.

OCR for page 9
Pure Component Output Table of Example 1. 13

OCR for page 9
14 Tool Step 1 of Example 1.

OCR for page 9
Tool Step 2_1 of Example 1. 15

OCR for page 9
16 Tool Step 2_2 of Example 1.

OCR for page 9
Tool Step 3_1 of Example 1. 17

OCR for page 9
18 Tool Step 3_2 of Example 1.

OCR for page 9
Tool Step 3_1(2) of Example 1. 19

OCR for page 9
Tool Step 3_2(Final) of Example 1. 21

OCR for page 9
22 Tool Step 3_1(3) of Example 1.

OCR for page 9
Tool Step 3_1(4) of Example 1. 23

OCR for page 9
24 Tool Step 3_1(Final) of Example 1.

OCR for page 9
Example 2. Chlorinated Solvents The mixture components and the mass fractions are shown in the Input Interface below. Input Interface of Example 2. 25

OCR for page 9
26 Output Table of Example 2.

OCR for page 9
Pure Component Output Table of Example 2. 27

OCR for page 9
28 Step 1 of Example 2.

OCR for page 9
Step 2_1 of Example 2. 29

OCR for page 9
30 Step 2_2 of Example 2.

OCR for page 9
Step 3_1 of Example 2. 31