Appendix E

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Keith C. Clarke is a research cartographer and professor in the Geography Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is also the Santa Barbara Director of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. Prior to joining the faculty in 1996, he was a professor at Hunter College and he also spent a year as an advisor to the Office of Research in the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS’s) National Mapping Division. He holds a B.A. from Middlesex Polytechnic (London) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in analytical cartography from the University of Michigan. Dr. Clarke’s research focuses on environmental simulation modeling, modeling urban growth, terrain mapping and analysis, and the history of satellite surveillance. He has played numerous leadership roles, including president of the Cartographic and Geographic Information Society and chair of several National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on Basic and Applied Research Priorities in Geospatial Science for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, the Committee on the New Research Directions for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency: A Workshop, and the Mapping Science Committee. Dr. Clarke is a recipient of the John Wesley Powell Award, the USGS’s highest award for achievement, and a fellow of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping.

Luc E. Anselin is Regents’ Professor and holds the Walter Isard Chair in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University (ASU). He is also the founding director of the School as well as of the GeoDa Center for Geospatial Analysis and Computation at ASU. His Ph.D. in regional science is from Cornell University and he holds a master’s degree in econometrics, statistics, and operations research from the Free University of Brussels, where he also obtained an undergraduate degree in economics. Dr. Anselin’s research deals with various aspects of spatial data analysis and geographic information science, ranging from exploratory spatial data analysis to geocomputation, spatial statistics, and spatial econometrics. He is a fellow of the Spatial Econometric Society, the Regional Science Association International, and the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science (UCGIS) and was awarded the Walter Isard Award in 2005 and the William Alonso Memorial Prize in 2006. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Alexandre M. Bayen is an associate professor of systems engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the faculty, he spent a year as research director of the Autonomous Navigation Laboratory (Ministry of Defense) in France. He holds an engineering degree in applied mathematics from Ecole Polytechnique, France, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University. His research interests are in mobile Internet applications (location-based services); participatory sensing; inverse modeling and data assimilation; and control, estimation, and optimization of distributed



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Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Keith C. Clarke is a research cartographer and profes- Analysis and Computation at ASU. His Ph.D. in sor in the Geography Department at the University of regional science is from Cornell University and he California, Santa Barbara. He is also the Santa Barbara holds a master’s degree in econometrics, statistics, ­ Director of the National Center for Geographic Infor­ and operations research from the Free University of mation and Analysis. Prior to joining the faculty in Brussels, where he also obtained an undergraduate 1996, he was a professor at Hunter College and he also degree in economics. Dr. Anselin’s research deals with spent a year as an advisor to the Office of Research in the various aspects of spatial data analysis and geographic U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS’s) National Mapping information science, ranging from exploratory spatial Division. He holds a B.A. from Middlesex Polytechnic data analysis to geocomputation, spatial statistics, and (London) and an M.A. and Ph.D. in analytical cartog- spatial ­ conometrics. He is a fellow of the Spatial e raphy from the University of Michigan. Dr. Clarke’s Econometric Society, the Regional Science Associa- research focuses on environmental simulation model­ tion International, and the University Consortium for ing, modeling urban growth, terrain mapping and Geographic Information Science (­ CGIS) and was U analysis, and the history of satellite surveillance. He awarded the Walter Isard Award in 2005 and the has played numerous leadership roles, including presi- W ­ illiam Alonso Memorial Prize in 2006. He is a dent of the Cartographic and Geographic Information member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Society and chair of several National Research Council American Academy of Arts and Sciences. (NRC) committees, including the Committee on Basic and Applied Research Priorities in Geospatial Science Alexandre M. Bayen is an associate professor of for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, the systems engineering in the Department of Electrical Committee on the New Research Directions for the Engineering and Computer Science, and Civil and National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency: A Work- Environmental Engineering at the University of Cali- shop, and the Mapping Science Committee. Dr. Clarke fornia, Berkeley. Prior to joining the faculty, he spent is a recipient of the John Wesley Powell Award, the a year as research director of the Autonomous Naviga- USGS’s highest award for achievement, and a fellow tion Laboratory (Ministry of Defense) in France. He of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping. holds an engineering degree in applied mathematics from Ecole Polytechnique, France, and an M.S. and Luc E. Anselin is Regents’ Professor and holds the Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford Walter Isard Chair in the School of Geographical University. His research interests are in mobile Internet Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State Uni- applications (location-based services); participatory versity (ASU). He is also the founding director of the sensing; inverse modeling and data assimilation; and School as well as of the GeoDa Center for Geospatial control, estimation, and optimization of distributed 165

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166 APPENDIX E parameter systems. Current sensor-network projects the University of Kansas, and her Ph.D. in geography are aimed at measuring water parameters, mapping from the University of Washington. Dr. Buttenfield’s earthquake shaking, and monitoring traffic. The lat- research focuses on map generalization, multiscale ter (Mobile Millennium) received the 2008 Best of geospatial database design, algorithms for web-based ITS Award for “Best Innovative Practice” at the ITS data delivery, and visualization of uncertainty in World Congress and the TRANNY Award from the envi­onmental modeling. She has also published on r California Transportation Foundation. Dr. Bayen re- spatial data infrastructures, adoption of geospatial ceived the CAREER award from the National Science technologies, and digital libraries. While working on Foundation and a Presidential Early Career Award for her master’s degree, she received 12 weeks of training Scientists and Engineers and was a participant in the in photogrammetry, photointerpretation, mapping, 2008 National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Fron- and charting, and spent a year as a cartographer at the tiers of Engineering symposium. Defense Mapping Agency, a predecessor organiza- tion to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. Grant C. Black is a teaching professor of economics Dr. Buttenfield has served on several NRC commit- and director of the Center for Entrepreneurship and tees related to cartography and the mapping sciences, Economic Education at the University of Missouri- most recently the Committee on Basic and Applied St. Louis. He was previously an associate professor of Research Priorities in Geospatial Science for the Na- economics at Indiana University South Bend, where tional Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. She is a past he also served as director of the Bureau of Business president of the Cartography and Geographic Informa- and Economic Research and the Center for Economic tion Society and a fellow of the American Congress on Education. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Surveying and Mapping. In 2001, she was named GIS Georgia State University. Dr. Black’s research focuses Educator of the Year by the University Consortium for on the economics of science and innovation, includ- Geographic Information Science. ing labor markets and training in the sciences, the transfer of knowledge in the economy, the geographic Kathleen M. Carley is a professor of computer science concentration of scientific and innovative activity, and at the Institute for Software Research in the School of the role of the foreign-born in scientific productivity. Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. She He is the author of the book The Geography of Small also directs the university’s Center for Computational Firm Innovation. Dr. Black served on the Research Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems, which Team for the NRC Committee for Capitalizing on brings together network analysis, computer science, Science, Technology, and Innovation: An Assessment and organization science, and also incorporates a train- of the Small Business Innovation Research Program ing program for Ph.D. students. She developed and and participated in other studies by the NRC Board directs the interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in Com- on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy. He also putation, Organizations and Society. She holds two participated in activities of the Scientific Workforce bachelor’s degrees from the Massachusetts Institute Project at the National Bureau of Economic Research of Technology—one in economics and one in political and the National Nanotechnology Initiative workshop science—and a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard Uni- on societal implications of nanotechnology. He is a versity. Dr. Carley uses organization theory, dynamic fellow of the Institute on the Data Resources of the network analysis, social networks, multiagent systems, National Science Foundation. and computational social science to examine how cog- nitive, social, technological, and institutional factors Barbara P. Buttenfield is a professor of geography at affect individual, team, social, and policy outcomes in the University of Colorado, Boulder. She also directs areas ranging from public health to counterterrorism the Meridian Lab, a small research facility focusing on to cyber security. She also develops tools for analyz- visualization and modeling of geographic information ing large-scale and geosituated dynamic networks and and technology. She received her B.A. in geography multiagent simulation systems that are used worldwide. from Clark University, her M.A. in geography from She is a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and

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APPENDIX E 167 Electronics Engineers (IEEE), received the lifetime and Geomatics Engineering at the University of New achievement award from the Mathematical Sociology Brunswick. He received a B.S. in applied physics from section of the American Sociological Association, and the University of Waterloo and a Ph.D. in experi­ the Simmel award for advances in social networks and mental space science from York University. Dr. Langley network science from the International Network for has worked extensively on global navigation satellite Social Network Analysis. Dr. Carley has participated systems techniques and algorithms for geodetic and in several NRC studies, including the Committee on high-precision surveying applications and for aircraft Modeling and Simulation for Defense Transforma- navigation and spacecraft systems. He is also interested tion and the Panel on Modeling Human Behavior in the evolving role of geodesy in surveying and map- and Command Decision Making: Representations for ping education and has given several talks on this topic. Military Simulations, and she was a keynote speaker at Dr. Langley is a co-author of the best-selling Guide to the 2010 Workshop on New Research Directions for GPS Positioning and is a columnist and contributing the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). editor of GPS World magazine. He is also active in pro- fessional and learned societies associated with geodesy John R. Jensen is Carolina Distinguished Professor and GPS. He is a past chair of the Canadian National and co-director of the GIS and Remote Sensing Center Committee for the International Union of Geodesy in the Department of Geography at the University of and Geophysics and a former member of the European South Carolina. His research interests are in remote Space Agency GNSS Scientific Advisory Group. He sensing of the environment, digital image processing, is an elected fellow of the International Association and biogeography. He received his B.A. in geography of Geodesy, the Institute of Navigation, and the Royal (photogrammetry focus) from California State Univer- Institute of Navigation. sity, Fullerton; his M.S. in geography (photogrammetry and cartography focus) from Brigham Young Univer- Edward M. Mikhail is Professor Emeritus of photo- sity; and his Ph.D. in geography (remote sensing and grammetry and the former head of Geomatics Engi- cartography focus) from the University of California, neering at Purdue University. He holds a B.S. in civil Los Angeles. He is also a certified photogrammetrist. engineering from Cairo University and an M.S. and a Dr. Jensen has written four textbooks, including Re- Ph.D. in photogrammetry and geodesy from Cornell mote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource University. Dr. Mikhail has taught and carried out Perspective, Introductory Digital Image Processing: A research in photogrammetry; data adjustment; digital Remote Sensing Perspective (now in its third edition), mapping; sensor modeling; and automated methods for and an electronic book on geospatial processing with feature extraction and analysis, registration, and fusion interactive frames of instruction and animation. He for more than 46 years. He established Purdue’s gradu- also serves on education committees and is a current ate program in geomatics engineering, and supervised member of the National Center for Geographic Infor- more than 250 master’s and some 30 Ph.D. students in mation and Analysis Remote Sensing Core Curriculum photogrammetry and geomatics. He also taught many Committee and a former chair of the Commission short courses on various aspects of photo­ rammetry g on Education in Remote Sensing and Geographic and mapping to government agencies and private Information Systems for the International Society for companies. He is familiar with NGA and its needs for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Dr. Jensen is a photogrammetrists, having spent several sabbaticals as former president and current fellow of the American a visiting scientist and training its employees. He cur- Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing and rently serves on NGA’s technical geopositioning and received that society’s Alan Gordon Memorial Award photogrammetric groups, and supports the Mensura- for significant achievements in remote sensing and tion Services Project. Dr. Mikhail has written many photographic interpretation. books on photogrammetry, least-squares adjustment, and surveying, and co-edited several manuals, includ- Richard B. Langley is a professor of geodesy and ing the Manual of Photogrammetry and the Handbook precision navigation in the Department of Geodesy of Civil Engineering. He is an honorary member of

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168 APPENDIX E the American Society for Photogrammetry and Re- and Teaching, which seeks to improve the quality of mote Sensing, a distinction held by no more than 25 learning and teaching of geography in higher educa- members at any given time, and received that society’s tion internationally. He has twice received the Journal Fairchild Photogrammetric Award for outstanding of Geography in Higher Education’s biennial award for achievement, as well as the German Alexander von promoting excellence in teaching and learning for his Hombolt Senior Scientist Award. He also received research on ­ eography faculty development and gradu- g commendations from the U.S. Geological Survey, the ate education. He holds a B.S. in earth sciences from Office of Research and Development, and the Imagery Pennsylvania State University and an M.S. and Ph.D. Intelligence Directorate of the National Reconnais- in geography from Pennsylvania State University and sance Office. the University of Colorado, Boulder, respectively. Shashi Shekhar is the McKnight Distinguished Paula Stephan is a professor of economics in the University Professor in the Department of Computer A ­ ndrew Young School of Policy Studies at ­ eorgia G Science at the University of Minnesota. He holds a State University and a research associate of the B. Tech in computer science from the Indian Institute N ­ ational Bureau of Economic Research. She gradu- of Technology in Kanpur, India, and an M.S. and Ph.D. ated from Grinnell College (Phi Beta Kappa) with in computer science from the University of California, a B.A. in economics and earned both her M.A. and Berkeley. Dr. Shekhar’s research interests are in spatial Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. databases and spatial data mining, an interdisciplin- Her research interests focus on the careers of scientists ary area at the intersection of computer science and and engineers and the process by which knowledge geographic information systems. He has co-edited an moves across institutional boundaries in the economy. Encyclopedia of GIS and co-authored a textbook on spa- Dr. Stephan has served on a number of NRC commit- tial databases. Dr. Shekhar is a fellow of the American tees, including the Committee on Examination of the Association for the Advancement of Science and IEEE, U.S. Air Force’s Science, Technology, Engineering and and received that society’s Technical Achievement Mathematics (STEM) Workforce Needs in the Future Award for contributions to spatial database storage and Its Strategy to Meet Those Needs; Committee methods, data mining, and geographic information on Dimensions, Causes, and Implications of Recent systems. He was a member of the NRC Mapping Sci- Trends in the Careers of Life Scientists; Committee ence Committee, the NRC Committee on Basic and on Methods of Forecasting Demand and Supply of Applied Research Priorities in Geospatial Science for Doctoral Scientists and Engineers; and the Committee the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the on Policy Implications of International Graduate Stu- Board of Directors of the University Consortium for dents and Postdoctoral Scholars in the United States. Geographic Information Science. She currently serves on the NRC Board on Higher Education and Workforce, and has been a member of Michael N. Solem is Director of Educational Affairs the Scientific Workforce Project at the National Bureau at the Association of American Geographers (AAG), of Economic Research since 2002. where he leads research projects in graduate educa- tion, international education, teacher preparation, and May Yuan is Brandt Professor and Edith Kinney workforce development of geographers. He is also G ­ aylord Presidential Professor and the director of the directing collaborative projects focusing on trends Center for Spatial Analysis at the University of Okla- and issues in geography in K-12 and higher educa- homa. She received a B.S. in geography from National tion in the United States and abroad. His publications Taiwan University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in geogra- on these topics appear regularly in the peer-reviewed phy from the State University of New York at ­ uffalo. B literature and in conference proceedings. Dr. Solem Dr. Yuan’s research interests are in temporal GIS, serves on the International Geographical Union’s geographic representation, spatiotemporal information Commission on Geographical Education and is co- modeling, and applications of geographic information coordinator of the International Network on Learning technologies to dynamic systems, such as wildfires and

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APPENDIX E 169 rainstorms. She was the president of the University Computer Science Department. Dr. Zyda is a pioneer Consortium for Geographic Information Science, in the fields of computer graphics, networked virtual and has served on several committees concerned with environments, modeling and simulation, and serious geospatial analysis. She is currently a member of the games. His research interests include collaboration in NRC Mapping Science Committee and the Academic entertainment and defense, and he has developed, for Advisory Board for the U.S. Geospatial Intelligence example, a game used by the Army for recruiting. He Foundation. She is familiar with geospatial intelligence has also served on numerous NRC committees advising needs and co-organized a workshop on geographic the Department of Defense, including the Committee ­dynamics sponsored by the intelligence community and on Modeling and Simulation: Linking Entertainment produced two books on the subject after the workshop. and Defense and the Committee on Defense Model- ing, Simulation and Analysis, and he was a participant Michael J. Zyda is a professor of engineering prac- in the 2010 Workshop on New Research Directions tice in the Department of Computer Science at the for the NGA. Dr. Zyda is a National Associate of the University of Southern California. He also directs National Academies and a member of the Academy of the university’s GamePipe Laboratory, which engages Interactive Arts and Sciences. He received a B.A. in students in research and development of interactive bioengineering from the University of California, San games. He initiated two cross-disciplinary degree Diego, an M.S. in computer science from the Univer- programs—a B.S. in computer science (games) and an sity of Massachusetts, and a Ph.D. in computer science M.S. in computer science (game development)—and from Washington University, St. Louis. doubled the incoming undergraduate enrollment of the

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