APPENDIX B
Biographical Information on Committee Members

Gordon H. Orians, (Chair) is professor emeritus of zoology at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is an ecologist and environmental scientist who conducts research on the evolution of vertebrate social systems, the structure of ecological communities, plant-herbivore interactions, the ecology of rare species, and environmental aesthetics. He is past president of the Ecological Society of America and a board member of the World Wildlife Fund. He is chair of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and has served on two previous NRC committees, the Committee on the Formation of the National Biological Survey and the Committee on the Applications of Ecological Theory to Environmental Problems, which he chaired. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1989.

Patricia A. Cochran is an Inupiat Eskimo born and raised in Nome, Alaska. Ms. Cochran serves as Executive Director of the Alaska Native Science Commission (ANSC), a cooperative effort of the Alaska Federation of Natives, University of Alaska Anchorage and the National Science Foundation. Ms. Cochran previously served as administrator of the Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage; Executive Director of the Alaska Community Development Corporation; Local Government Program Director with the University of Alaska Fairbanks; and Director of Employment and Training for the North Pacific Rim Native Corporation.

John W. Duffield is Professor of Economics at the University of Montana where he has taught since 1974. Dr. Duffield's research focus is on nonmarket valuation of wildlife and fishery resources. In recent years he has directed studies of natural resource issues ranging from wolf recovery in Yellowstone N.P. to



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Wolves, Bears, and their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management APPENDIX B Biographical Information on Committee Members Gordon H. Orians, (Chair) is professor emeritus of zoology at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is an ecologist and environmental scientist who conducts research on the evolution of vertebrate social systems, the structure of ecological communities, plant-herbivore interactions, the ecology of rare species, and environmental aesthetics. He is past president of the Ecological Society of America and a board member of the World Wildlife Fund. He is chair of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and has served on two previous NRC committees, the Committee on the Formation of the National Biological Survey and the Committee on the Applications of Ecological Theory to Environmental Problems, which he chaired. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1989. Patricia A. Cochran is an Inupiat Eskimo born and raised in Nome, Alaska. Ms. Cochran serves as Executive Director of the Alaska Native Science Commission (ANSC), a cooperative effort of the Alaska Federation of Natives, University of Alaska Anchorage and the National Science Foundation. Ms. Cochran previously served as administrator of the Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage; Executive Director of the Alaska Community Development Corporation; Local Government Program Director with the University of Alaska Fairbanks; and Director of Employment and Training for the North Pacific Rim Native Corporation. John W. Duffield is Professor of Economics at the University of Montana where he has taught since 1974. Dr. Duffield's research focus is on nonmarket valuation of wildlife and fishery resources. In recent years he has directed studies of natural resource issues ranging from wolf recovery in Yellowstone N.P. to

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Wolves, Bears, and their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management instream flow levels in Montana trout streams. His work in Alaska includes analysis of lake fisheries in the Tanana Valley and Arctic grayling fisheries in the Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim region. In 1992 he participated in the Exxon Valdez litigation on behalf of the Alaska Native class. He is a co-author, with Kevin Ward, of Natural Resource Damages: Law and Economics (New York: John Wiley & Sons 1992). Todd K. Fuller is an Associate Professor of Wildlife Ecology in the Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He has conducted research on wolf population ecology and prey relationships in Alberta, and on wolf, white-tailed deer, and hunter interactions in Minnesota. He also has studied the ecology of jackals and African wild dogs in Kenya, foxes in Chile, and black bears, porcupines and fishers in Massachusetts. Dr. Fuller teaches courses in wildlife ecology, conservation, and management, while also guiding graduate students studying a variety of carnivores and herbivores in California, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Vermont, China, Costa Rica, Mongolia, and Papua New Guinea. Ralph J. Gutierrez is currently a Professor of Wildlife Management at Humboldt State University. He has been studying wildlife since 1968. His primary areas of interest and research are endangered species management, game management, habitat ecology, and hunting ethics. He has conducted both research and consulting in Alaska. In addition to his many research activities and interests, he has served on many government and private conservation committees. He has published many scientific papers in his areas of interest including the book North American Game Birds and Mammals. W. Michael Hanemann is professor of economics at University of California Berkeley. He works on contingent valuation, the most widely used approach in economic assessments of wildlife management issues. He was commissioned by the Alaska Board of Trustees to assess the economic impact of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on Alaskan fisheries. Frances C. James is a professor in the Department of Biological Science at Florida State University, where she teaches courses on the ecology and systematics of birds and mammals, conservation biology, and data analysis. Her major current research projects involve the analysis of broad scale population trends in birds and the relationship between fire ecology and the endangered fauna of the southeastern pine forests. She is the associate editor of the Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics and served as 1997 president of the American Institute of Biological Sciences. In 1997 she received the Ecological Society of America's "Most Eminent Ecologist" award. Peter M. Karieva is professor of ecology at the University of Washington, Seattle. Dr. Karieva is a population ecologist whose primary subject is population modeling, but who is also interested field biology. He is currently supervising a Ph.D. student's work on wolf-prey interactions. Stephen R. Kellert is a professor at the Yale University School of Forestry

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Wolves, Bears, and their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management and Environmental Studies. Much of Dr. Kellert's work has focused on the value of wildlife, including attitudes towards wildlife and human dimensions in wildlife management. He has received awards from the Society for Conservation Biology (Distinguished Individual Achievement, 1990), International Foundation for Environment Conservation (Best Publication of the year, 1987), National Wildlife Federation (Conservationist Of The Year, 1983), and a Fulbright Research Fellowship (Japan, 1985–86). He has served on Agriculture and Wildlife Committees at the National Science Foundation, and is a member of the IUCN Species Survival Commission Specialist Groups. He has published over 100 scientific papers and books including, most recently, "The Value of Life: Biological Diversity and Human Society" (Island Press, 1996), and "Kinship to Mastery: Biophilia in Human Evolution and Development" (Island Press, 1997). David Klein is Senior Scientist with the Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit and Professor in the Department of Biology and Wildlife and Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He worked as a biologist in Alaska with the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game before joining the faculty of the University of Alaska in 1962. Dr. Klein's research emphases include population ecology, habitat relationships, and foraging dynamics of northern ungulates, primarily caribou, muskoxen, deer, and moose; ecology and adaptations of arctic wildlife; and influences of northern development activities on wildlife. Alaska has been the primary focus of his research activities, although he has also worked in Canada, Greenland, Scandinavia, Siberia, and Africa. Bruce McLellan has been employed since 1989 as a Wildlife Research Ecologist with the British Columbia Ministry of Forests Research Branch. His work involves the coordination and implementation of wildlife/forestry research on issues that are of provincial importance. Dr. McLellan works on black and grizzly bears in other locations in British Columbia. In addition to his work on bears, he has conducted research on the ecology of caribou, wolves and wolverine in an area primarily managed for timber production for the past 5 years. Perry D. Olson is a native of Colorado and graduate of Colorado State University. He has over 35 years of professional experience in the field of wildlife management and wildlife administration. He began his professional career with the Colorado Division of Wildlife as a Wildlife Conservation Officer in 1960 and has held a number of positions including Wildlife Biologist, State Big Game Biologist, Regional Director and Executive Director. He retired in 1996 after serving as Executive Director of the Colorado Division of Wildlife for over 7 years. Mr. Olson holds numerous national and international awards for creativity and excellence in wildlife management and administration. George Yaska is Liaison Officer for the Tanana Chiefs Conference, Inc. (TCC), which is a consortium of 43 tribes within the Interior of Alaska. Before this September, he was Director of Wildlife and Parks at TCC. The area TCC encompasses is approximately equal to 39% of Alaska.

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Wolves, Bears, and their Prey in Alaska: Biological and Social Challenges in Wildlife Management He is trained and experienced in traditional knowledge. He has spoken with hundreds of Alaska Natives and has also been trained by his family and community. NRC STAFF Janet Joy (Study Director) has been a Program Officer at the National Research Council since 1994. She received a BS in behavior and biology from the University of Michigan, a Ph.D. in zoology from the University of Toronto in 1983, and did postdoctoral work at the University of Texas and Northwestern University. She was a Senior Staff Fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health at NIH from 1989–1994. Her research interests include environmental biology, behavior, and neuroscience. At the NRC, she has served as study director for projects on biodiversity management and intellectual property issues. Jeff Peck (Project Assistant) worked on this study from January 1996 to January 1997. In his four years at the Board on Biology, he assisted with numerous studies including The Value of Biodiversity, Intellectual Property Rights and Research Tools in Molecular Biology, the Scientific Basis for the Preservation of the Mariana Crow, and the Convocation on Scientific Conduct. He has a BA in journalism, and a Masters in international journalism, both from Baylor University. He has written several freelance articles including political and international news features. Allison Sondak (Project Assistant) is a project assistant at the Board on Biology. She has worked on fisheries and environmental policy in the US Senate and on park management at the National Park Service. Her interests include natural resource policy and coastal zone management. She earned a BA in Environmental Policy at Duke University, and has studied marine science at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.