TABLE 4-6 Committee Recommendations for Relative Distribution of Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Traineeship and Fellowship Awards in Behavioral Sciences for FY 1994 through FY 1999

     

Type of Support

Fiscal Year

Level of Training

TOTAL

Traineeship

Fellowship

1994

Recommended number of awards

1,195

1,040

155

 

Predoctoral

745

670

75

 

Postdoctoral

400

320

80

 

MARC Undergraduate

50

50

-

1995

Recommended number of awards

1,325

1,150

175

 

Predoctoral

825

740

85

 

Postdoctoral

450

360

90

 

MARC Undergraduate

50

50

-

1996

Recommended number of awards

1,450

1,260

190

 

Predoctoral

900

810

90

 

Postdoctoral

500

400

100

 

MARC Undergraduate

50

50

-

1997

Recommended number of awards

1,450

1,260

190

 

Predoctoral

900

810

90

 

Postdoctoral

500

400

100

 

MARC Undergraduate

50

50

-

1998

Recommended number of awards

1,450

1,260

190

 

Predoctoral

900

810

90

 

Postdoctoral

500

400

100

 

MARC Undergraduate

50

50

-

1999

Recommended number of awards

1,450

1,260

190

 

Predoctoral

900

810

90

 

Postdoctoral

500

400

100

 

MARC Undergraduate

50

50

-

Careers (MARC) has included a small number of awards for research training in the behavioral sciences. In recent years, about 50 awards were made for training in this area (Table 4-5).

The MARC program represents a unique and special program of support for the recruitment of minorities into research careers in the behavioral sciences. We look forward to reviewing the outcome of the review of the MARC program presently being conducted under the auspices of NIH. We endorse the continuation of MARC support for research training in the behavioral sciences at current levels until that study is complete.

RECOMMENDATION: The committee recommends that the number of NRSA awards for research training in the behavioral sciences through the MARC program be maintained at about 50 per year, pending completion of the NIH review.

NOTES

1. Broadly construed to include psychology, sociology, anthropology, and speech and hearing sciences. See Appendix B for a list of disciplines included in this area.

2. There was a significant drop in the academic sector work force between 1989 and 1991. In part, this decline may reflect methodological changes that were introduced at that time to the Survey from which these data were generated. However, the decline may be reflecting a weakening of demand in the academic sector.

3. Approximately 30,000 thousand of the 67,000 workers employed in the behavioral sciences in 1991 were clinical psychologists whose participation in health-related research varies from year to year.



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