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Suggested Citation:"Acronyms/Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2001. Under the Weather: Climate, Ecosystems, and Infectious Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10025.
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Page 109

Acronyms/Abbreviations

AGCC Anthropogenic Global Climate Change
AVHRR Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer
CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
CHAART Center for Health Applications of Aerospace Related Technologies
DoD Department of Defense
ENSO El Niño/Southern Oscillation
FEWS Famine Early Warning System
GCM General Circulation Models
GIS Geographic Information System
HPS Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
IA Integrated Assessment
IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
NDVI Normalized Difference Vegetation Index
NOAA National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
NRC National Research Council
PAHO Pan American Health Organization
RVF Rift Valley Fever
SEIR Susceptible, Exposed, Infected, Removed
SLE St. Louis Encephalitis
USGCRP United States Global Change Research Program
WHO World Health Organization
WMO World Meteorological Organization
Suggested Citation:"Acronyms/Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2001. Under the Weather: Climate, Ecosystems, and Infectious Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10025.
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Page 109
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Under the Weather: Climate, Ecosystems, and Infectious Disease Get This Book
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Since the dawn of medical science, people have recognized connections between a change in the weather and the appearance of epidemic disease. With today's technology, some hope that it will be possible to build models for predicting the emergence and spread of many infectious diseases based on climate and weather forecasts. However, separating the effects of climate from other effects presents a tremendous scientific challenge.

Can we use climate and weather forecasts to predict infectious disease outbreaks? Can the field of public health advance from "surveillance and response" to "prediction and prevention?" And perhaps the most important question of all: Can we predict how global warming will affect the emergence and transmission of infectious disease agents around the world?

Under the Weather evaluates our current understanding of the linkages among climate, ecosystems, and infectious disease; it then goes a step further and outlines the research needed to improve our understanding of these linkages. The book also examines the potential for using climate forecasts and ecological observations to help predict infectious disease outbreaks, identifies the necessary components for an epidemic early warning system, and reviews lessons learned from the use of climate forecasts in other realms of human activity.

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