National Academies Press: OpenBook

Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report (2001)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

« Previous: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda and Participants
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×

Page 83

Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members andStaff

THOMAS A. LOUIS (Chair) is a senior statistical scientist at RAND and adjunct professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. His research interests focus on Bayesian methods with applications in health, environmental, and public policy. He is coordinating editor of The Journal of the American Statistical Association, a member of the Committee on National Statistics, on the board of the Institute of Medicine's Medical Follow-up Agency, and on the executive committee of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. He was on the IOM Panel to Assess the Health Consequences of Service in the Persian Gulf War and was on the CNSTAT Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from Columbia University and from 1987 to 1999 headed the department of Biostatistics at the University of Minnesota.

GORDON J. BRACKSTONE is assistant chief statistician responsible for statistical methodology, computing, and classification systems at Statistics Canada. From 1982 to 1985 he was the director-general of the Methodology Branch at Statistics Canada, and previously he was responsible for surveys and data acquisition in the Central Statistical Office of British Columbia. His professional work has been in survey methodology, particularly

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×

Page 84

the assessment of the quality of census and survey data. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He received B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in statistics from the London School of Economics.

DANELLE J. DESSAINT (Project Assistant) is a staff member of the Committee on National Statistics. Her projects include ones on formula allocations, State Children's Health Insurance program, elder abuse, and institutional review boards. She has a B.A. in communications from Wingate University and formerly worked as an editor at Tribune Media Services in Glens Falls, NY.

VIRGINIA A. de WOLF (Study Director) is a senior program officer on the staff of the Committee on National Statistics. Previously, she has worked at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the U.S. General Accounting Office, and the University of Washington (Seattle). In the early 1990s she served as the study director of the panel that authored Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics. Currently, her areas of research interest are confidentiality and data access as well as statistical policy. She has a B.A. in mathematics from the College of New Rochelle and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington (Seattle) in educational psychology with emphases in statistics, measurement, and research design.

LINDA GAGE is California's state demographer and chief of the Demographic Research Unit at the California Department of Finance. She has held various positions within the Demographic Research Unit since 1975. Previously she held research and teaching assistant positions at the University of California. Her fields of demographic activity are in applied demography, small-area data analysis, migration, race/ethnicity, population estimates and projections, analysis of U.S. Census Bureau programs/procedures/data, fertility, and mortality. She has an M.A. in Sociology from the University of California, Davis, with emphasis in demography.

MARISA A. GERSTEIN (Research Assistant) is a staff member of the Committee on National Statistics. She is currently working on projects on welfare impacts, WIC, and elder abuse. Previously, she worked at Burch Munford Direct, a direct mail company, and the National Abortion and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×

Page 85

Reproductive Rights Action League. She has a B.A. in sociology from New College of the University of South Florida.

HERMANN HABERMANN is director of the Statistics Division for the United Nations. Previously, he was the deputy associate director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, where he also served as chief statistician. In addition to his knowledge of statistics, he brings to the committee his knowledge of the federal statistical system. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in statistics.

THOMAS B. JABINE is a statistical consultant who specializes in the areas of sampling, survey research methods, statistical disclosure analysis, and statistical policy. Recent clients include the Committee on National Statistics, the National Center for Health Statistics, and several other statistical agencies and organizations. He was formerly statistical policy expert for the Energy Information Administration, chief mathematical statistician for the Social Security Administration, and chief of the Statistical Research Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. He has provided technical assistance in sampling and survey methods to several developing countries for the United Nations, the Organization of American States, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. His publications are primarily in the areas of sampling, survey methodology and statistical policy. He has a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in economics and science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

ALLEN L. SCHIRM is a senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Formerly, he was Andrew W. Mellon assistant research scientist and assistant professor at the University of Michigan. His principal research interests include small-area estimation, census methods, and sample and evaluation design, with application to studies of child well-being and welfare, food and nutrition, and education policy. He is currently an Associate Editor of Evaluation Review. He served on the Committee on National Statistics Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas and is currently a member of its Panel on Research on Future Census Methods. He is a member of the American Statistical Association's Section on Survey Research Methods Working Group on Technical Aspects of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. He has an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×

Page 86

BRUCE D. SPENCER is a professor of statistics at Northwestern University. He chaired the Statistics Department at Northwestern from 1988 to 1999 and 2000 to 2001. He directed the Methodology Research Center of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago from 1985 to 1992. From 1992 to 1994 he was a senior research statistician at NORC. At the National Research Council he was a panel member with the Mathematical Sciences Assessment Panel, and the Panel on Statistical Issues in AIDS Research. He served as study director for the Panel on Small Area Estimates of Population and Income. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2001. Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10178.
×
Page 86
Choosing the Right Formula: Initial Report Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $38.00 Buy Ebook | $30.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The workshop was a direct outgrowth of a previous study by the CNSTAT Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. That panel, established under a 1994 act of Congress, began its work with a very specific mission: to evaluate the suitability of the U.S. Census Bureau's small-area estimates of poor school-age children for use in the allocation of funds to counties and school districts under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

In carrying out their assignment, panel members came to realize that the properties of data sources and statistical procedures used to produce formula estimates, interacting with formula features such as thresholds and hold-harmless provisions, can produce consequences that may not have been anticipated or intended. It also became evident that there is a trade-off between the goals of providing a reasonable amount of stability in funding from one year to the next and redirecting funds to different jurisdictions as true needs change. In one instance, for example, the annual appropriation included a 100 percent hold-harmless provision, ensuring that no recipient would receive less than the year before. However, there was no increase in the total appropriation, with the result that new estimates showing changes in the distribution of program needs across areas had no effect on the allocations.

Choosing the Right Formula provides an account of the presentations and discussions at the workshop. The first three chapters cover the overview, case studies, and methodological sessions, respectively. Chapter 4 summarizes the issues discussed in the roundtable and concluding sessions, with emphasis on the identification of questions that might be addressed in a panel study.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!