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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Index

A

ACT test, 55

Age factors

see also Primary and secondary education

adults technological literacy, general, 64-68

automobile air bags, 26-29

museums and science centers, 89

social well-being, 44

student attitudes toward technology, 63-64

Agriculture, 116-117

genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32

Global Positioning System, 41

American Architectural Foundation, 91-92

American Association for the Advancement of Science, 15(n.1), 58, 78, 80-81, 108, 109, 110, 124, 126, 130, 143-144

American Institute of Architects, 91-92

Army Corps of Engineers, 38-39

Assessment of technological literacy, 9, 31, 63-72, 105, 107-110

see also Tests and testing

Association for Career and Technical Education , 127

Association of Science-Technology Centers, 88-89, 127

Attitudes, 4, 17, 18, 20, 118

see also Public opinion

adults, 64-67, 68, 71, 109

science and technology centers, 88-89

students, 63-64, 71

Automobiles, 22, 26-29, 65

Autonomous Technology:

Technics-out-of-Control as a Theme in Political Thought, 115

Awards, see Contests and awards

B

Battelle Memorial Institute, 138

committee study sponsorship, vii, 2, 12

Benchmarks for Science Literacy, 78, 106, 126

Beyond Engineering: How Society Shapes Technology, 116

Biological Sciences Curriculum Studies, 79

Biomedical sciences, 14, 19, 48, 52, 67

see also Health and safety issues

curriculum development, 78, 79, 81

genetics,

genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32, 67

public participation in decision making, 95

legislation, 61

professional organizations, 92-93

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
×

Black persons, 42, 43, 129, 138, 143

Boosting Engineering, Science, and Technology, 131-132

Britain, see United Kingdom

British School Examinations Assessment Council, 69

Building Big, 121

Buildings, Bridges, and Tunnels, 116

C

Canada, 68-69, 70

Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act, 82

Center for Engineering Education Outreach, 128

Center for Occupational Research and Development , 82-83, 128

Children Designing and Engineering Project, 121-122

City Technology Project, 122

Colleges and universities, 7, 84-88, 124, 128, 133

see also Teacher education

museums and science centers, 89

public decision making, 95, 112

Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills, 41

Competency, technical, see Technical competency

Computer technology, 4, 5-6, 13-15, 58-59, 133

see also Internet

adult literacy, 64

climate models, 14

curriculum standards, 81

digital divide, 42-44, 45, 61, 138

Global Positioning System, 41

mass media coverage, 67, 90-91

overemphasis on, 58-63

primary and secondary education, 5-6, 44

digital divide, 42-44, 45, 61, 138

overemphasis on, 58-59

teaching with technology vs teaching about technology, 6, 58-59

Congress, see Legislation;

Office of Technology Assessment

Consensus conferences, 39, 95, 97

Constructive technology assessment, 96, 144-145

Consumer decision making, 3, 16, 25

automobile air bags, 22, 26-29, 65

genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32

Contests and awards, 98

students, 93-94, 131-136

teachers, 10, 113-114

Cost and cost-benefit factors, 4, 20

see also Risk assessment

automobile air bags, 27

Boston Central Artery and Tunnel, 37-40

California energy crisis, 36

engineering process, 52

Council for Basic Education, 56

Council of State Governments, 62

Council on Technology Teacher Education, 87-88

Craftsman/NSTA Young Inventors Award, 132

Cultural factors, 4, 16, 23, 81, 118, 120

see also Political factors;

Social factors

religious issues, 117, 119

Curriculum and instructional materials development, 2, 77-80, 91-92, 104, 105, 109, 113

biomedical sciences, 78, 79, 81

Department of Education, 8-9, 105, 107

federal government involvement, 9, 82, 83

inventive programs, 10, 105

National Science Foundation, 6-7, 8-9, 56, 57, 82, 105, 107, 123, 141

national standards, 9, 78-79, 80, 104, 105, 106-108, 126-127

postsecondary education, 85

resources for technological literacy summarized, 121-125, 128-129, 130

state standards, 8, 9, 126

technician preparation/vocational education, 82-83

textbooks, 77-78, 105-106

D

Danish Board of Technology, 95, 111

Decision making, 3-4, 8, 25-35, 45, 94-98, 103-104, 110-113

see also Problem solving

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
×

automobile air bags, 22, 26-29, 65

Boston Central Artery and Tunnel, 37-40

California energy crisis, 32-36

civic, 3-4, 7, 11, 12, 21, 22, 23, 36-40, 65-66, 70-71, 86-87, 90, 94-98, 103-104, 110-111

colleges and universities, 95, 112

consensus conferences, 39, 95, 97

genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32

leadership, 3-4, 9, 12, 16, 26, 59-63, 111-112, 114

museums and science centers, 90

participation in, general, 7, 36-37, 39, 94-98

constructive technology assessment, 96

scenario workshops, 95-97

science shops, 96

technological determinism, 51, 52-53, 115, 116

Definitional issues

technological literacy, 3, 4, 14-21

technological literacy vs technological competency, 21-22

technology, vii, 2-3, 13-14, 51

Department of Education

primary and secondary education, curricula and instructional materials, 8-9, 105, 107

research on methods of learning, 9, 110

Department of Housing and Urban Development, 94

Department of Transportation, 94

The Design of Everyday Things, 16

Designing Engineers, 116

Digital divide, 42-44, 45, 61, 138

Dimensions of technological literacy, 3, 14-16, 23, 26, 69, 81, 98

air bags, 29

California energy crisis, 35, 36

genetically modified foods, 32

Does Technology Drive History?: The Dilemma of Technological Determinism, 116

Draper Prize, 132

Dream Reaper: The Story of an Old-Fashioned Inventor in the High-Tech, High-Stakes World of Modern Agriculture, 116-117

E

Economic factors, 121, 129, 131

see also Cost and cost-benefit factors;

Employment

California energy crisis, 32-36

digital divide, 42-44, 45, 61, 138

job skills, 4-5, 40-42, 45, 49-50

leadership, 26, 111

Education Development Center, 80

Elementary and secondary education, see Primary and secondary education

Elementary Science Education Partners Program, 140-141

Employment

job skills, 4-5, 40-42, 45, 49-50

school-to-work partnerships, 84, 105

vocational education, 7, 53-55, 58, 77, 82-84

Energy resources and supply

decision making, California energy crisis, 32-36

historical perspectives, 50

EngineerGirl, 123

Engineering Concepts Curriculum Project, 77-78

Engineering in the Mind’s Eye, 117

Engineers and engineering, 2, 4, 112

college curricula, 7, 42

design process, 13, 18, 21, 37, 51-52, 58, 81, 108, 116, 117, 122-123, 132-136

earthquakes, legislation, 61

electrical power, 50

fellowship programs, 10, 112-113

primary and secondary education, 54, 81, 91-93, 108

contests and awards, 93-94

relationship to science, 13-14, 51-52

resources for technological literacy summarized, 116, 117, 119-120, 121-127, 130-136

social implications, 22, 51, 52-53, 115, 116

women, 123, 131

Environmental protection, 52

Boston Central Artery and Tunnel, 38-39

California energy crisis, 34

genetically modified organisms, 30, 31

Environmental Protection Agency, 30, 38-39

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
×

Ethnicity, see Race/ethnicity

European Awareness Scenario Workshop, 95-96

European Union

genetically modified organisms, 30

public opinion/knowledge polls, 69

urban areas, public participation in decision making, 95-96

The Existential Pleasures of Engineering, 117

F

Federal government, 2, 7, 63, 71, 84

see also Funding;

Legislation;

terms beginning “Department of...”

automobile air bags, 27

Boston Central Artery and Tunnel, 38-40

defense applications, 41

genetically modified organisms, 30

infrastructure projects, public education, 9

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 57, 61, 67, 82, 124, 137, 138, 143, 144

primary and secondary education, 8, 82, 83, 104-105, 107, 130

teacher awards, 10, 113-114

public participation in decision making , 7, 94-95, 97-98, 110-112

vocational education, 83

Federal Highway Administration, 39-40

Fellowship programs, 10, 111-112

FIRST LEGO League, 132

FIRST Robotics Competition, 93, 94, 133

Food science, genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32

Foreign countries, see International perspectives

Foundations, 9, 91-93, 95, 111-112

see also National Science Foundation

Funding, 9, 58, 61, 62, 86

see also Contests and awards;

Department of Education;

National Science Foundation

civic decision making, 94-95

committee study sponsorship, vii, 2, 12

fellowship programs, 10, 112-113

primary and secondary education, 6-7, 8-9, 56-57, 109

computer technology, 58-59, 61

curricula and instructional materials, 6-7, 8-9, 56, 57, 82, 91-92, 105, 109, 123

school-to-work partnerships, 84

student awards, 93-94

teacher awards, 10, 113-114

teacher training, 59-60, 91-92

Future City Competition, 94, 133

Future Problem Solving Program, 133

G

Gallup Organization, 64, 68, 71

Gender factors, 123, 141

automobile air bags, 28

Society of Women Engineers, 131

student attitudes toward technology, 63

Genetics

genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32, 67

public participation in decision making, 95

Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education, 134

Government, 52

see also Federal government;

Political factors;

State government

civic decision making, 3-4, 7, 11, 12, 21, 22, 23, 36-40, 65-66, 70-71, 86-87, 90, 94-98. 103-104, 110-111

fellowship programs, 10, 111-112

leadership, 3-4, 9, 12, 16, 26, 70. 111-112, 114

Great Britain, see United Kingdom

The Great Idea Finder, 117

Greatest Achievements of the 20th Century, 117

H

Handbook of Science and Technology, 86

Health and safety issues, 48, 52, 67

see also Biomedical sciences

automobile air bags, 26-29

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
×

genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32

telecommunications legislation, 61

High Tech, High Touch: Technology and Our Search for Meaning, 117

Higher education, see Colleges and universities;

Vocational education

Hispanics, 42-43, 129

Historical perspectives, 3, 4, 6, 11-12, 16, 22, 47-51, 80, 85-86, 105, 106, 142-143

see also Legislation

automobile air bags, 27-28

cultural literacy, 16, 18

genetically modified organisms, 30

international test comparisons, 69

Internet sites, 80, 116, 117, 118, 120, 121

museums, 2, 7, 9, 88-90, 98, 110, 111, 128-129, 141

primary and secondary education, 56, 59-60, 83-84, 105, 106

postsecondary education, 85-86

resources for technological literacy summarized, 115-121, 128-129, 131

social well-being, 44

urban transportation, 37

vocational education, 83-84

How Stuff Works, 118

I

Incentive programs

contests and awards, 98

students, 93-94, 131-135

teachers, 10, 113-114

curriculum development, 10, 105

teachers, 9, 10, 59-60, 108, 113-114

Informal education, 7, 88-94, 98-99, 103, 104, 110, 111

see also Mass media

museums, 2, 7, 9, 88-90, 98, 110, 111, 128-129, 141

science and technology centers, 2, 7, 61, 88-90, 110, 111, 127

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 92, 122

Instructional materials, see Curriculum and instructional materials development

Integrated Mathematics, Science, and Technology, 123

Integrating Technology Education Across the Curriculum, 123

Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, 93, 134

Intellectual Appropriation of Technology: Discourses on Modernity, 1900-1939 , 118

Interdisciplinary approaches, 104, 125-126, 131

engineering courses, 85-86

postsecondary education, general, 85

International perspectives, 68-70

contests and awards, 135

foreign workers in U.S., 42, 61

genetically modified organisms, 30

primary and secondary education,

technology education, general, 53-54

testing, 6, 104-105

public decision making, 95-97, 111

resources for technological literacy summarized, 121

science and technology centers, 88-89

student attitudes, 63

International Technology Education Association, 7, 64, 71, 80-82, 87-88, 98, 108, 109, 114, 123, 127, 128, 139

Internet, 4, 5-6, 44, 110, 111, 118, 119, 120-136 (passim)

contests and awards, 131-136

digital divide, 42-44, 45, 61, 138

historical perspectives on science, 80, 116, 117, 118, 120, 121

mass media connections, 90

report at hand, website, vii, 2, 12

teaching with technology vs teaching about technology, 6, 58-59

test comparisons, 6, 64, 68-70, 106

The Invention That Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technological Revolution, 118

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
×

J

Jefferson, Thomas, 11

Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, 128-129, 134

Journal of Technology Education, 128

Junior Engineering Technical Society, 93-94, 129

K

K-12, see Primary and secondary education

L

Leadership, 3-4, 9, 12, 16, 26, 59-63, 111-112, 114

Learning by Design, 123

Learning processes, 57-58

Legislation, 62, 111

California energy crisis, 32-36

Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act, 82

educational, 59-62, 82, 84

National Environmental Protection Act, 38

School to Work Opportunities Act, 84

Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, 128, 134

Loka Institute, 95, 129

Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time, 118

M

Madison, James, 11

Man-Made World, 77-78

Manufacturing Is Cool!, 124

Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, 126

Mass media, 3-4, 7, 14, 20, 90-91, 98, 110, 142

see also Informal education;

Internet

Boston Central Artery and Tunnel, 39

computer technology, coverage of, 67, 90-91

fellowship programs, 10, 111-112

news coverage of technology, 66-67, 90-91

Mathematics, 4, 6, 122, 123, 125, 126, 127

characteristics of technologically literate person, see “characteristics...” under Technological literacy, general

international test comparisons, 6, 64, 70

state standards, 8, 106

Media influences, see Mass media

Medical sciences, see Biomedical sciences

Methodology, 108-110

see also Definitional issues;

Interdisciplinary approaches

assessment of technological literacy, 9, 31, 63-72, 105, 107-110;

see also Tests and testing

committee study at hand, vii-x, 8, 12, 103

National Science Foundation, 9, 58, 109, 110

Middle School Science and Technology, 79, 124

Minorities, see Race/ethnicity

Misconceptions, 5, 50-53

More Work for Mother: The Ironies of Household Technology from the Open Hearth to the Microwave, 118-119

Multidisciplinary approaches, see Interdisciplinary approaches

Museums, 2, 7, 9, 88-90, 98, 110, 111, 128-129, 141

see also Science and technology centers

N

Naked City, 48

National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, 129

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 57, 61, 67, 82, 124, 137, 138, 143, 144

National Assessment of Educational Progress, 55, 106

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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National Association for Science, Technology, and Society, 79-80

National Center on Education and the Economy, 56

National Center for Education Statistics, 83

National Conference of State Legislatures, 62

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, 87

National Council of Teachers of English, 79

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 126-127

National Engineering Design Challenge, 93-94, 134-135

National Engineers Week, 92, 94

National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, 27

National Public Radio, 91

National Science Board, 66-68

National Science Education Standards, 78, 106, 126

National Science Foundation assessment tools, 9

committee study sponsorship, vii, 2, 12

digital divide, 61

history, philosophy, and sociology of science, 86

primary and secondary education, 105

curricula and instructional materials, 6-7, 8-9, 56, 57, 82, 105, 107, 123, 141

teacher incentives, 10, 108, 113-114

research on methods of learning, 9, 58, 109, 110

state legislatures, 62

National Science Resources Center, 79, 130

National Skill Standards Board, 84, 130

Netherlands, 63, 96, 111

O

Odyssey of the Mind, 135

Office of Technology Assessment, 60

Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, 69-70

P

Paths of Innovation: Technological Change in the 20th Century, 119

PATT, see Pupils’ Attitude Toward Technology

Pew Research Center, 67, 68

Physics in Context, 83

Political factors, 8, 115, 129, 131

see also Government

civic decision making, 3-4, 7, 11, 12, 21, 22, 23, 36-40, 65-66, 70-71, 86-87, 90, 94-98, 110-111

Postsecondary education, see Colleges and universities;

Vocational education

Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 113-114, 138

Presidential Awards for Excellence in Technology Teaching, 10, 113-114

Primary and secondary education, 5-7, 47, 53-57, 63-64, 71-72, 77-84, 98-99, 104-107

see also Curriculum and instructional

materials development;

Teacher education;

Teachers;

Tests and testing

committee report audience, 2

computers and the Internet, 5-6, 44

contests and awards, 93-94, 131-136

digital divide, 42-44, 45, 61, 138

engineering, 54, 81, 91-93, 108

federal government, 8, 82, 83, 104-105, 107, 130

funding, 6-7, 8-9, 56-57, 109

computer technology, 58-59, 61

curricula and instructional materials, 6-7, 8-9, 56, 57, 82, 91-92, 105, 109, 123-124

school-to-work partnerships, 84

student awards, 93-94

teacher awards, 10, 113-114

teacher training, 59-60, 91-92

historical perspectives, 56, 59-60, 83-84, 105, 106

international perspectives,

technology education, general, 53-54

testing, 6, 104-105

museums and science centers, 89

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
×

National Science Foundation, 105

curricula and instructional materials, 6-7, 8-9, 56, 57, 82, 105, 107, 123, 141

teacher incentives, 10, 108, 113-114

overemphasis on, 58-59

problem solving, 56, 92, 133

resources for technological literacy summarized, 121-126, 128-129, 130

school-to-work partnerships, 84, 105

standards, 7, 8, 9, 55-56, 78-79, 80-82, 98, 104-105, 106-107, 108, 126-127, 139-140, 143-144, 145

Benchmarks for Science Literacy, 78, 106, 126

national standards, 9, 78-79, 80, 104, 105, 106-108, 126-127

state standards, 8, 9, 126

vocational, 84

state government, 8, 9, 53, 60, 62, 82-83, 104-107

school-to-work partnerships, 84, 105

standards, 8, 9, 126

student attitudes toward technology, 63-64, 71

teacher awards, 10, 113-114

vocational education, 7, 53-55, 58, 77, 82-84

teacher education, 54-56, 124-125

Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, 106, 126

Principles of Technology, 82-83

Prizes, see Contests and awards

Problem solving, 13, 23, 57-58, 129, 135, 141

see also Decision making

everyday skills, 4, 17, 20, 49-50, 116, 118-119

job skills, 4-5, 40-42, 45, 49-50

primary and secondary education, 56, 92, 133

Programme for International Student Assessment, 70

Project 2061, 124, 130

Public Broadcasting System, 91

Public opinion

see also Mass media

Boston Central Artery and Tunnel, 40

civic decision making, 3-4, 7, 11, 12, 21, 22, 23, 36-40, 65-66, 70-71, 86-87, 90, 94-98. 103-104, 110-111

genetically modified organisms, 29, 30, 31

misconceptions, 5, 50-53

technology, general, viii, 4, 5, 6, 10, 109, 132

Public Radio International, 91

Pupils’ Attitude Toward Technology, 63

R

Race/ethnicity

black persons, 42, 43, 129, 138, 143

digital divide, 42-44, 45, 61, 138, 143

Hispanics, 42-43, 129

National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, 129

Rathenau Institute, 96

Reform of education, 2, 8

The Religion of Technology: The Divinity of Man and the Spirit of Invention, 119

Religious issues, 117, 119

Rescuing Prometheus: Four Monumental Projects That Changed The Modern World, 119

Research methodology, see Methodology

Resources for Science Literacy, 108, 124

Risk assessment, 4, 17, 19, 32

see also Cost and cost-benefit factors

automobile air bags, 22, 26-29

civic decision making, 37

genetically modified organisms, 14, 18, 26, 29-32

RI/SME Student Robotic Engineering Challenge, 135

S

Safety, see Health and safety issues

Salvadori Center, 130-131

SAT test, 55

School to Work Opportunities Act, 84

Science and Engineering Indicators, 66-68

Science and technology centers, 2, 7, 61, 88-90, 110, 111, 127

see also Museums

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Science for All Americans, 78, 108

Science shops, 96

Science T.R.A.C.S., 79

Secondary education, see Primary and secondary education

Sightseer’s Guide to Engineering, 119

Smithsonian Institution, 79, 80, 128-130

Social factors, 4, 7, 8, 18, 20, 23, 138-139

see also Cultural factors;

Political factors;

Public opinion

museums and science centers, 89-90

postsecondary education, 85, 86-87

primary and secondary education curriculum, 78, 80, 81, 82, 91-92, 105, 106, 108

resources for technological literacy summarized, 115-117, 118, 120, 128-129, 131

technological determinism, 51, 52-53, 115, 116

well-being, 44-45

Society for Automotive Engineers, 91

Society for the History of Technology, 80, 131

Society of Women Engineers, 131

The Soul of a New Machine, 119-120

Standards, 130

benchmarks for literacy, 55-56, 78, 105, 106, 126-127

dimensions of literacy, 3, 14-16, 23, 26, 29, 32, 35, 36, 69, 81, 98

engineering design process, 13, 18

primary and secondary education, 7, 8, 9, 55-56, 78-79, 80-82, 98, 104-105, 106-107, 108, 126-127, 139-140, 143-144, 145

Benchmarks for Science Literacy, 78, 106, 126

national standards, 9, 78-79, 80, 104, 105, 106-108, 126

state standards, 8, 9, 126

vocational, 84

resources for technological literacy summarized, 125-127

teacher education, 7, 79, 80, 87-88

Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology, 7, 79, 80, 88, 106, 108, 127, 128

see also International Technology Education Association

State government, 2, 111-112

California energy crisis, 32-36

governors, 62-63

legislatures, technical capabilities, 60, 62, 71, 111

primary and secondary education, 8, 9, 53, 60, 62, 82-83, 104-107

school-to-work partnerships, 84, 105

standards, 8, 9, 126

State Science, Engineering and Technology program, 62

Systems, understanding of, 17

T

Teacher education, 9, 54-55, 59-60, 87-88, 107-108, 130-131, 140

see also Curriculum and instructional materials development

incentive programs, 9, 10, 59-60, 108, 113-114

International Technology Education Association, 7, 64, 71, 80-82, 87-88, 98, 108, 109, 114, 127, 128, 139

museums and science centers, 89

professional organizations, cooperation with, 91-92, 130-131

standards, 7, 79, 80, 87-88

vocational, 54-56, 124-125

Teachers, 2, 8, 108

contests and awards, 10, 113-114

International Technology Education Association, 7, 64, 71, 80-82, 87-88, 98, 108, 109, 114, 126-127, 128, 139

Technical competency, general, 7, 21-22 everyday skills, 4, 17, 20, 49-50, 116, 118-119

Technological Literacy, 120

Technological literacy, general

characteristics of literate person, 4, 17-21

air bags, 29

Boston Central Artery and Tunnel, 40

California energy crisis, 35, 36

genetically modified foods, 32

defined, 3, 4, 14-21, 120

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
×

dimensions of, 3, 14-16, 23, 26, 29, 32, 35, 36, 69, 81, 98

Technology, defined, vii, 2-3, 13-14

Technology and Culture, 120

Technology and the Future, 120

Technology Literacy Challenge, 58-59

Technology Teacher Magazine, 125, 128

Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology, 120

Telecommunications, 14, 48, 57(n.1)

see also Internet;

Mass media

adult understanding of, 65

curriculum standards, 81

wireless communication, legislation, 61

Tests and testing, 8, 55, 63, 104-105, 106, 128-129

see also Assessment of technological literacy;

Contests and awards

international test comparisons, 6, 64, 68-70, 106

National Assessment of Educational Progress , 55, 106

National Science Foundation, literacy assessment tools, 9

Tests of Engineering Aptitude, Mathematics, and Science, 93

Textbooks, 77-78, 105-106

Third International Math and Science Study, 64, 106

TIES Magazine, 125

To Engineer Is Human: The Role of Failure in Successful Design, 120

Toshiba/NSTA Exploravision Awards, 135-136

Transportation services, 37-40, 48, 49 curriculum standards, 81

high-speed rail, 61

resources for technological literacy summarized, 116

TSM Connection Activities, 125

U

The Unbound Prometheus: Technological Change and Industrial Development in Western Europe from 1750 to the Present, 121

United Kingdom, 69

Universities, see Colleges and universities

Urban areas, 37-40, 48, 94, 95-96, 133

V

Views On Science, Technology, and Society, 68-69

Virtual Center for Science and Technology, 121

Vocational education, 7, 53-55, 58, 77, 82-84

school-to-work partnerships, 84, 105

teacher education, 54-56, 125, 127

W

Why Things Bite Back: Technology and the Revenge of Unintended Consequences, 121

World in Motion series, 92, 125-126

World Wide Web, see Internet

Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Suggested Citation:"Index." National Academy of Engineering and National Research Council. 2002. Technically Speaking: Why All Americans Need to Know More About Technology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10250.
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Cell phones . . . airbags . . . genetically modified food . . . the Internet. These are all emblems of modern life. You might ask what we would do without them. But an even more interesting question might be what would we do if we had to actually explain how they worked?

The United States is riding a whirlwind of technological change. To be sure, there have been periods, such as the late 1800s, when new inventions appeared in society at a comparable rate. But the pace of change today, and its social, economic, and other impacts, are as significant and far reaching as at any other time in history. And it seems that the faster we embrace new technologies, the less we’re able to understand them. What is the long-term effect of this galloping technological revolution? In today’s new world, it is nothing less than a matter of responsible citizenship to grasp the nature and implications of technology.

Technically Speaking provides a blueprint for bringing us all up to speed on the role of technology in our society, including understanding such distinctions as technology versus science and technological literacy versus technical competence. It clearly and decisively explains what it means to be a technologically-literate citizen. The book goes on to explore the context of technological literacy—the social, historical, political, and educational environments.

This readable overview highlights specific issues of concern: the state of technological studies in K-12 schools, the reach of the Internet into our homes and lives, and the crucial role of technology in today’s economy and workforce. Three case studies of current issues—car airbags, genetically modified foods, and the California energy crisis—illustrate why ordinary citizens need to understand technology to make responsible decisions. This fascinating book from the National Academy of Engineering is enjoyable to read and filled with contemporary examples. It will be important to anyone interested in understanding how the world around them works.

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