National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Index
Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×

PLATE 1 Thomas Jefferson Planning District EPI community element diagram— urban mixed use. SOURCE: Chris Sinclair, Renaissance Planning Group, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×

PLATE 2 Thomas Jefferson Planning District EPI community element diagram— suburban mixed use. SOURCE: Chris Sinclair, Renaissance Planning Group, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×

PLATE 3 Grand Staircase-Escalante Land Status GIS Map. Data were gathered from a variety of sources and integrated to provide a planning context. Data shown outside the monument may not have been verified. The map represents available information and should not be interpreted to alter existing authorities or management responsibilities. SOURCE: Produced by Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (1999).

Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×

PLATE 4 Grand Staircase-Escalante, Alternative E. Data were gathered from a variety of sources and integrated to provide a planning context. Data shown outside the monument may not have been verified. The map represents available information and should not be interpreted to alter existing authorities or management responsibilities. SOURCE: Produced by Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (1999).

Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×

PLATE 5 Grand Staircase-Escalante, Management Zones and Transportation System. The Frontcountry Zone (78, 056 acres) is intended to be the focal point for visitation by providing day use opportunities close to adjacent communities and to Highways 12 and 89. This zone would accommodate the primary interpretation, overlooks, trails, and associated facilities necessary to feature monument resources. The Passage Zone (38, 316 acres) includes secondary travel routes that receive use as throughways and recreation destinations. Rudimentary facilities necessary to protect resources, to educate visitors about monument resources, or for public safety would be provided. The Outback Zone (537,662 acres) is intended to provide an undeveloped primitive and self-directed visitor experience while

Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×

accommodating motorized and mechanized access on designated routes. Facilities would be rare and provided only where essential for resource protection. The Primitive Zone (1,211,386 acres) provides an undeveloped, primitive, and self-directed visitor experience without motorized or mechanized access. Some administrative routes are included in the zone, which could allow very limited motorized access to authorized users. Facilities would be virtually nonexistent. Data were gathered from a variety of sources and integrated to provide a planning context. Data shown outside the Monument may not have been verified. The map represents available information and should not be interpreted to alter existing authorities or management responsibilities. SOURCE: Produced by Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (1999).

Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×

PLATE 6 City of Arden Hills, Minnesota, comprehensive development plan map.

Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×
Page 186
Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×
Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×
Page 188
Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×
Page 189
Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×
Page 190
Suggested Citation:"Color Plates." National Research Council. 2002. Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10262.
×
Page 191
Community and Quality of Life: Data Needs for Informed Decision Making Get This Book
×
Buy Hardback | $61.00 Buy Ebook | $48.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

“Quality of life” . . . “livability” . . . “sense of place.” Communities across America are striving to define these terms and to bring them to life, as they make decisions about transportation systems and other aspects of planning and development.

Community and Quality of Life discusses important concepts that undergird community life and offers recommendations for collaborative planning across space and time. The book explores:

  • Livability as an ensemble concept, embracing notions such as quality of place and sustainability. It discusses how to measure the “three legs” of livability (social, economic, ecological) while accounting for politics and personal values. And the book examines how to translate broad ideas about livability into guidelines for policymaking
  • Place as more than location, including the natural, human-built, and social environments. The book discusses the impact of population changes over time, the links between regional and local identity, and other issues
  • Tools for decision making in transportation and community planning. It reviews a variety of decision models and tools such as geographic information systems (GIS)—as well as public and private sources of relevant data.

Including several case examples, this book will be important to planners, planning decision makers, planning educators and students, social scientists, community activists, and interested individuals.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!