National Academies Press: OpenBook

Review of EarthScope Integrated Science (2001)

Chapter: Appendix B: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
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Appendix B
Committee Biographies

George M.Hornberger, NAE, is Ernest H.Ern Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia, where he has taught since 1970. He has also been a visiting scholar at the Australian National University, Lancaster University, Stanford University, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Colorado. His research is aimed at understanding how hydrological processes affect the transport of dissolved and suspended constituents through catchments and aquifers. Dr. Hornberger is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), a member of the Geological Society of America, and has served on numerous NRC boards and committees including chair of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. Dr. Hornberger won the Robert E.Horton Award (Hydrology Section) from the AGU in 1993. In 1995, he received the John Wesley Powell Award from the USGS, and was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering in 1996. In 1999, the AGU presented the Excellence in Geophysical Education Award to him. Dr. Hornberger received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Drexel University in 1965 and 1967, respectively. In 1970, he received a Ph.D. in hydrology from Stanford University.

Arthur R.Green is Chief Scientist for ExxonMobil Exploration Company. His research focuses on the evolution of the Arctic and its hydrocarbon potential, integrated basin analysis methods, and regional tectonic analysis. He has served on several NRC committees, most recently including: the Committee to Review the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program, the Committee on Arctic Solid-Earth Geosciences, the Advisory Committee to the U.S. Geological Survey, and the U.S. Geodynamics Committee.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
×

Susan E.Humphris is a Senior Scientist in the Department of Geology and Geophysics and Director of the Earth-Ocean Exploration Institute at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Her research interests include the volcanic and tectonic controls on the distribution and characteristics of hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges, and the geochemistry of rock-water interactions, and the role of the associated hydrothermal fluxes in global geochemical mass balances. She is a member of the American Geophysical Union, and recently served on the NRC Committee to Review the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program.

James A.Jackson is a Reader in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge. His research interests include active continental deformation on all scales, from individual faults to orogenic belts, in particular: (1) the relation between presently active deformation and the geological development and structural history of older orogenic belts, (2) the detailed relations between seismic faulting at depth and active geomorphology at the surface, and (3) descriptions and models of large scale continental kinematics and dynamics. He has received various awards and scholarships including the Bigsby Medal in 1997 from the Geological Society of London, and has more than 95 publications in refereed international journals. Dr. Jackson received a B.A. in Geology from Cambridge in 1976, and an M.A. and Ph.D. also from Cambridge in 1980.

Eldridge M.Moores is Professor of Geology at the University of California, Davis, and author of several major books on geology. He holds a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology (1959) and a Ph.D. from Princeton University (1963). His research focuses on tectonics and structural geology of mountain belts from Greece to the Sierra Nevada. Dr. Moores was President of the Geological Society of America in 1996. His other honors include the 1988 Geological Society of America Distinguished Service Award, the 1994 Geological Association of Canada Medal, and an honorary D. Sc. in 1997 from the College of Wooster.

Barry E.Parsons is Reader in Geodesy, Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford. He has been involved in research on mantle and crustal dynamics for more than 25 years. For the past 15 years, his work has involved geophysical applications of geodetic techniques: the construction of high-resolution marine gravity fields from satellite altimetry

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
×

and ship gravity and their application in studying ocean-floor tectonics; the measurement and interpretation of crustal deformation using GPS and SAR interferometry; and the construction of high-resolution digital elevation models and geomorphological applications in studying active faulting. He has substantial experience in the planning, observation, and analysis of regional GPS surveys. Dr. Parsons received a B.A. in natural sciences from Cambridge in 1969 and a Ph.D. from Cambridge in 1973.

Robin P.Riddihough is an emeritus scientist at Natural Resources Canada, in Ottawa, Ontario. He was a senior manager in the Earth Sciences Sector and Geological Survey of Canada for 15 years, including 6 years as chief scientist of the Geological Survey. His research interests include regional and marine geophysics, magnetic and gravity surveys, plate tectonics and kinematics. He received a B.S. in geology from Kings College London in 1959, a DIC in applied geophysics and M.S. in geophysics from Imperial College, London in 1960 and 1961, and a Ph.D in geophysics from the University of London in 1967.

Karl K.Turekian, NAS, is Silliman Professor of Geology and Geophysics at Yale University, and Director of the Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies and the Director of the Center for the Study of Global Change. He received his undergraduate education in chemistry at Wheaton College (Illinois) and his Ph.D in geochemistry from Columbia University. His research areas include marine geochemistry, atmospheric geochemistry of cosmogenic, radon daughter and man-made radionuclides, surficial and groundwater geochemistry of radionuclides, planetary degassing, geochronology based on uranium decay chain and radiocarbon of the Pleistocene, osmium isotope geochemistry, and climate change.

NRC Staff

David A.Feary is a Senior Program Officer with the NRC’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, responsible for managing the earth science activities of the Board. He received B.Sc and M.Sc. (Hons) degrees from the University of Auckland and his Ph.D from the Australian National University. His research activities have focused on the geological and geophysical evolution of continental margins, using high resolution seismic reflection data and Ocean Drilling Program coring to understand the factors controlling carbonate deposition and reef development within different climatic regimes.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
×
Page 57
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
×
Page 58
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
×
Page 59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Committee Biographies." National Research Council. 2001. Review of EarthScope Integrated Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10271.
×
Page 60
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EarthScope is a major science initiative in the solid-earth sciences and has been described as "a new earth science initiative that will dramatically advance our physical understanding of the North American continent by exploring its three-dimensional structure through time". The initiative proposes to cover the United States with an array of instruments created to reveal how the continent was put together, how the continent is moving now, and what lies beneath the continent. The initiative is made of four components, three of which are funded by the Major Research Equipment program of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and one of which is mostly associated with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

In response to a request by the NSF, the National Research Council (NRC) established a committee to review the science objectives and implementation planning of the three NSF components, United States Seismic Array (USArray), the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). The committee was charged with answered four specific questions: Is the scientific rationale for EarthScope sound, and are the scientific questions to be addressed of significant importance?, Is there any additional component that should be added to the EarthScope initiative to ensure that it will achieve its objective of a vastly increased understanding of the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the continental crust of North America?, Are the implementation and management plans for the three elements of EarthScope reviewed here appropriate to achieve their objectives?, and Have the appropriate partnerships required to maximize the scientific outcomes from EarthScope been identified in the planning documents?

Review of EarthScope Integrated Science presents the committee's findings and recommendations. To reach its conclusions the committee reviewed extensive written material and listened to presentations by members of the EarthScope Working Group and other interested scientists. The recommendations encompass science questions, management, education and outreach, and partnerships. Overall the committee was impressed by the EarthScope initiative.

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