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The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries (2006)

Chapter: Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
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Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference

The Genomic Revolution:

Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, Irvine, California

November 10-13, 2005

AGENDA

Wednesday, November 9 (Hyatt Regency Newport Beach)

6:00–10:00 p.m.

Welcome Reception / Registration – Garden Room 1 & Garden

Thursday, November 10 (Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies)

7:45 and 8:15 a.m.

Bus pick-up from the Hyatt Regency Newport

Beach to the Beckman Center

8:00 a.m.

Registration (Outside Auditorium)

8:00–9:00 a.m.

Breakfast (Dining Room)

9:00–9:30 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks (Auditorium)

Wm. A. Wulf, President, National Academy of Engineering

Harvey V. Fineberg, President, Institute of Medicine

Richard N. Foster, Board Member, W.M. Keck Foundation

Robert Waterston, Chair, Genomics Steering Committee

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

9:30–10:30 a.m.

Overview “Tutorial” Sessions

 

Genomics, Structural Biology, and Rational Vaccine Design

Gary J. Nabel

Director of the Vaccine Research Center

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

National Institutes of Health

 

Diversity of Human Microbial Pathogens and Commensals / Host-Pathogen Interaction (Part I)

David Relman

Associate Professor of Microbiology & Immunology and of Medicine Stanford University

Chief, Infectious Diseases Section

Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System

 

Question and Answer section for these two presentations will take place at 11:30

10:30–11:00 a.m.

Break (Atrium)

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Overview “Tutorial” Sessions / Q&A

 

Diversity of Human Microbial Pathogens and Commensals / Host-Pathogen Interaction (Part II)

David Relman

 

11:30–12:15 Q&A – Gary Nabel,

David Relman, and Claire Fraser

12:15–1:30 p.m.

Lunch (Dining Room)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

1:30–3:00 p.m.

Overview “Tutorial” Sessions / Q&A

 

Team Science

Mary E. Lidstrom

Vice Provost of Research

Professor in Chemical Engineering and Microbiology

Frank Jungers Chair of Engineering

University of Washington

 

Team Science: The Microscale Life Sciences Center (MLSC)

Deirdre Meldrum

Director, NIH CEGS Microscale Life Sciences Center and the UW Genomation Laboratory

Professor of Electrical Engineering

University of Washington

 

2:30–3:00 Q&A

3:00–3:30 p.m.

Task to Working Group

3:30–4:00 p.m.

Break (Atrium / Palm Court 2 / Bay View 2)

4:00–6:00 p.m.

Working Group Session 1 (Locations throughout Beckman Center)

 

2.

Technology to improve rapid response.

Bay View II – 2nd floor

 

3.

Develop an inexpensive diagnostic test.

Laguna – 2nd floor

 

5.

Spend $100 million to prevent the next pandemic flu.

Emerald Bay – 2nd floor

 

6.

Can genomics facilitate vaccine development?

Irvine Cove – 2nd floor

 

9.

Develop a device to detect and identify pathogens.

Board Room – 1st floor

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

 

10.

Shared pathways of attack for prevention.

Harbour – 2nd floor

 

11-1.

Role of public health in integrating genomics.

Balboa – 1st floor

 

11-2.

Role of public health in integrating genomics.

Newport – 1st floor

 

12.

Sequence an individual’s genome for under $1,000.

Crystal Cove – 1st floor

 

14-1.

Natural variation in disease resistance.

Lido – 2nd floor

 

14-2.

Natural variation in disease resistance.

Back Bay – 2nd floor

6:00–7:00 p.m.

Reception / Networking

7:00–9:00 p.m.

Dinner and Communication Awards Presentation (Atrium)

9:00 p.m.

Buses depart Beckman Center for Hyatt Regency Newport Beach

9:00–11:00 p.m.

Informal Discussions / Hospitality Room

Hyatt Regency Newport Beach – Garden Room 1 and Garden

Friday, November 11 (Beckman Center)

7:15 and 7:45 a.m.

Bus pick-up from the Hyatt Regency Newport

Beach to the Beckman Center

7:30–8:30 a.m.

Breakfast (Dining Room)

8:30–10:45 a.m.

Overview “Tutorial” Sessions / Q&A (Auditorium)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

 

Some Roles of Computation in Molecular Biology

Michael Waterman

University Professor

Professor of Biological Sciences, Mathematics, and Computer Science

University of Southern California

 

Human Genetic Variation

Leonid Kruglyak

Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics

Princeton University

 

Dual Meaning of Dual Use

Robert Cook-Deegan

Director, Center for Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy

Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy

Duke University

 

10:00–10:45 Q&A

10:45–11:15 a.m.

Break (Atrium) / Friday Poster Set-up

11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

Overview “Tutorial” Sessions / Q&A

 

Issues from Developing Countries: What are their needs? What are their unique delivery and implementation issues (access, cost, power requirements, transportability, etc.)?

Austin Demby

Senior Staff Fellow

Global AIDS Program

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

 

Genetic Analysis of Innate Immune Sensing

Bruce Beutler

Professor

Department of Immunology

Scripps Research Institute

 

12:15–12:45 Q&A

12:45–2:00 p.m.

Lunch (Friday session posters available for previewing)

2:00–3:45 p.m.

Working Group Session 2 (Same meeting places as session 1)

(3:00–3:45—Coffee and refreshments will be available in the Atrium, Palm Court 2, and Bay View 2)

3:45–5:00 p.m.

Working Group Report Outs (Each group gives a 5 minute debrief) (Aud.)

5:00–6:30 p.m.

Friday Poster Session

 

5:00–5:45 p.m.

Odd numbered posters are attended

 

5:45–6:30 p.m.

Even numbered posters are attended

 

(Refreshments will be served Atrium)

6:30 p.m.

Buses depart Beckman Center for Hyatt Regency Newport Beach

7:00–9:00 p.m.

Buffet Dinner – Hyatt Regency Newport Beach – Terrace Room

9:00–11:00 p.m.

Informal Discussions / Hospitality Room

Hyatt Regency Newport Beach – Garden Room 1 and Garden

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

Saturday, November 12 (Beckman Center)

7:45 and 8:15 a.m.

Bus pick-up from the Hyatt Regency Newport

Beach to the Beckman Center

8:00–9:00 a.m.

Breakfast (Dining Room)

9:00–10:30 a.m.

Overview “Tutorial” Sessions / Q&A (Auditorium)

 

Human Genome Sequencing at $5,000 a Pop

Robert H. Waterston

Head, Department of Genome Sciences

William H. Gates III Chair of Biomedical Sciences

University of Washington School of Medicine

 

Microsystems

Todd Thorsen

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 

10:00–10:30 Q&A

10:30–11:00 a.m.

Break (Atrium) / Saturday Poster Set-up

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Working Group Session 3 (Same meeting places as session 1)

1:00–2:00 p.m.

Lunch (Saturday session posters available for previewing)

2:00–3:30 p.m.

Saturday Poster Session

 

2:00–2:45 p.m.

Odd numbered posters are attended

 

2:45–3:30 p.m.

Even numbered posters are attended

 

(3:00–4:00—Coffee and refreshments will be available in the Huntington Room, Palm Court 2, and Bay View 2)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

3:30–5:30 p.m.

Working Group Session 4 (Same meeting places as session 1)

5:30–6:30 p.m.

Networking / Reception

6:30 - 8:00 p.m.

Dinner (Atrium)

8:00 p.m.

Buses depart Beckman Center for Hyatt Regency Newport Beach

9:00–11:00 p.m.

Informal Discussions / Hospitality Room

Hyatt Regency Newport Beach – Garden Room 1 and Garden

Sunday, November 13 (Beckman Center)

7:15 and 7:45 a.m.

Bus pick-up from the Hyatt Regency Newport

Beach to the Beckman Center

7:30–8:30 a.m.

Breakfast (Dining Room)

8:30–10:15 a.m.

Working Group Report-Outs (Auditorium) (15 minutes per group)

10:15–10:45 a.m.

Break (Atrium)

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Working Group Report-Outs – continued (Auditorium)

12:00–1:00 p.m.

Lunch

12:00 and 1:00 p.m.

Buses depart for Hyatt Regency Newport Beach and John Wayne Airport

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×

THE GENOMIC REVOLUTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR TREATMENT AND CONTROL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASE WORKING GROUP TOPICS

TECHNOLOGY
  1. Design a point-of-care diagnostics for rapid detection of viral and bacterial pathogens. (not running)

  2. Identify what technological advances in the fields of science and engineering need to be developed (either new technology or novel integration of existing technologies) to improve rapid response to new or emerging diseases? For example, can carefully reengineered viruses or bacteria become the next generation of therapeutic agents? How can computational biology better integrate the vast amounts of genomic knowledge to assist these efforts?

  3. Develop an inexpensive (and cost-effective) diagnostic test (infection, genotype) that could be deployed in countries with little scientific research infrastructure. How can nanotechnology and new rapid diagnostic methods for other targets be adapted to diagnose malaria species, drug-resistance mutations, and vaccine-resistance polymorphisms in malaria-endemic countries?

  4. Can genetically modified organisms be used to control disease? (not running)

VACCINES / GENOMIC ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS
  1. How would you spend $100 million over the next five years to prevent the next pandemic flu? What would be the research strategy to utilize fully the genomic sequences of the hosts and pathogens to accelerate the development of therapeutics and vaccines for its prevention and control?

  2. How can genomics facilitate vaccine development? Would efficient methods of synthesis of genomes help? Can genomics help to improve the assessment of efficacy of vaccines? What are the safety concerns?

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
  1. How can genomic analysis of immune evasion strategies facilitate vaccination against HIV? (not running)

  2. How can genomic analysis of immune evasion strategies facilitate vaccination against malaria? (not running)

DIAGNOSIS
  1. Develop a device to rapidly and sensitively detect and identify pathogens in an environment/population, spread either naturally or through deliberate acts. Can genomics help differentiate between natural and deliberate disease outbreak and provide evidence for attribution? Do we know what defines—both genotypically and phenotypically—a pathogen vs. a nonpathogenic invader? If not, how can we determine this?

  2. Are there shared pathways of attack that might provide new avenues of prevention? How can we find them? Once identified, what methods can be developed to stop them?

  3. Explore the emerging role of public health in integrating genomics in surveillance, outbreak investigations, and control and prevention of infectious diseases. (two sections will be running due to high interest in this topic)

NATURAL VARIATION
  1. What will it take to sequence an individual person’s genome for under $1,000 in ten years?

  2. Can evolutionary models of the emergence of resistance in a pathogen combined with combinatorial treatment schemes be used to develop a strategy to hold the pathogen in check? (not running)

  3. How can we use natural variation in disease resistance to understand host-pathogen interactions and devise new therapies? (two sections will be running due to high interest in this topic)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 102
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: The 3rd Annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference Program." National Research Council. 2006. The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease: Working Group Summaries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11615.
×
Page 106
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The 2005 conference, "The Genomic Revolution: Implications for Treatment and Control of Infectious Disease," attracted scientists, engineers, and medical researchers to work on new interdisciplinary responses using genomics to treat and control infectious diseases. Eleven conference working groups gave the participants eight hours to develop new research approaches to problems in infectious disease using genomics. Among the challenges were designing a new device to detect viral and bacterial pathogens; how best to use $100 million to prevent a future pandemic flu outbreak; how to improve rapid response to an outbreak of disease and reduce the cost of diagnostic tests; and how to sequence an individual's genome for under $1,000. Representatives from public and private funding organizations, government, industry, and the science media also participated in the working groups. This book provides a summary of the conference working groups. For more information about the conference, visit www.keckfutures.org/genomics.

The National Academies Keck Futures Initiative was launched in 2003 to stimulate new modes of scientific inquiry and break down the conceptual and institutional barriers to interdisciplinary research. The National Academies and the W.M. Keck Foundation believe considerable scientific progress and social benefit will be achieved by providing a counterbalance to the tendency to isolate research within academic fields. The Futures Initiative is designed to enable researchers from different disciplines to focus on new questions upon which they can base entirely new research, and to encourage better communication between scientists as well as between the scientific community and the public. Funded by a $40 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation, the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative is a 15-year effort to catalyze interdisciplinary inquiry and to enhance communication among researchers, funding agencies, universities, and the general public with the object of stimulating interdisciplinary research at the most exciting frontiers. The Futures Initiative builds on three pillars of vital and sustained research: interdisciplinary encounters that counterbalance specialization and isolation; the identification and exploration of new research topics; and communication that bridges languages, cultures, habits of thought, and institutions. Toward these goals, the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative incorporates three core activities each year: Futures conferences, Futures grants, and National Academies Communication Awards.

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