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Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action (2006)

Chapter: Appendix A Acronyms

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11643.
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A
Acronyms

ACOT Advisory Committee on Transplantation

AHA American Heart Association

AMA American Medical Association

AOPO Association of Organ Procurement Organizations

AST American Society of Transplantation

ASTP American Society of Transplant Physicians

ASTS American Society of Transplant Surgeons

CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDD circulatory determination of death

CMS Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation

DCDD donation after circulatory determination of death

DHHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

DNDD donation after neurologic determination of death

DoT Division of Transplantation, Health Resources and Services Administration

EMS emergency medical services

ESRD end-stage renal disease

FHWA Federal Highway Administration

FY fiscal year

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11643.
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HCFA Health Care Financing Administration

HLA human leukocyte antigen

HRSA Health Resources and Services Administration

ICU intensive care unit

IHI Institute for Healthcare Improvement

IOM Institute of Medicine

JCAHO Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations

MELD Model for End-Stage Liver Disease

MOTTEP Minority Organ and Tissue Transplant Education Program

NATCO Organization for Transplant Professionals

NCCUSL National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws

NCHS National Center for Health Statistics

NCQA National Committee for Quality Assurance

NCSL National Conference of State Legislatures

NDD neurologic determination of death

NHBD non-heart-beating organ donation

NIDDK National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases

NIH National Institutes of Health

NKF National Kidney Foundation

NOTA National Organ Transplant Act

OPO organ procurement organization

OPTN Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

PHASE Pre-Hospital Arrest Survival Evaluation

SCCM Society of Critical Care Medicine

SRTR Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients

UAGA Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

UDDA Uniform Determination of Death Act

UNOS United Network for Organ Sharing

WHC Washington Hospital Center

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11643.
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Page 283
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Acronyms." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11643.
×
Page 284
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Rates of organ donation lag far behind the increasing need. At the start of 2006, more than 90,000 people were waiting to receive a solid organ (kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, heart, or intestine). Organ Donation examines a wide range of proposals to increase organ donation, including policies that presume consent for donation as well as the use of financial incentives such as direct payments, coverage of funeral expenses, and charitable contributions. This book urges federal agencies, nonprofit groups, and others to boost opportunities for people to record their decisions to donate, strengthen efforts to educate the public about the benefits of organ donation, and continue to improve donation systems. Organ Donation also supports initiatives to increase donations from people whose deaths are the result of irreversible cardiac failure. This book emphasizes that all members of society have a stake in an adequate supply of organs for patients in need, because each individual is a potential recipient as well as a potential donor.

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