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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Patents." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11656.
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Appendix D
Patents

Since 1990, the Naval Medical Research Center (NMRC) and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) malaria vaccine programs have had six and eight patents granted, respectively. One further WRAIR patent is expected to be assigned a patent number in the coming months. The titles of approved patents are listed below.

NMRC PATENTS GRANTED TO DATE

U.S. Patent Issue No. 5,095,093 on March 10, 1992

Title: Protective four amino acid epitope against Plasmodium vivax malaria

Inventors: Hoffman, Charoenvit, and Jones


U.S. Patent Issue No. 5,198,535 on March 30, 1993

Title: Protective malaria sporozoite surface protein immunogen and gene

Inventors: Hoffman, Charoenvit, Hedstrom, Khusmith, and Rogers


U.S. Patent Issue No. 5,599,543 on February 4, 1997

Title: Protective four amino acid epitope against Plasmodium vivax malaria

Inventors: Hoffman, Charoenvit, and Jones


U.S. Patent Issue No. 5,814,617 on September 29, 1998

Title: Protective 17 kDa malaria hepatic and erythrocytic stage immunogen and gene

Inventors: Hoffman, Charoenvit, Hedstrom, and Doolan

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Patents." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11656.
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U.S. Patent Issue No. 6,066,623 on May 23, 2000

Title: Polynucleotide vaccine protective against malaria, methods of protection and vector for delivering polynucleotide vaccines

Inventors: Hoffman, Hedstrom, and Sedegah


U.S. Patent Issue No. 6,399,062 on June 4, 2002

Title: Murine monoclonal antibody protective against Plasmodium vivax malaria

Inventors: Charoenvit, Hoffman, and Beaudoin

WRAIR PATENTS GRANTED TO DATE

U.S. Patent Issue No. 4,906,564 on March 6, 1990

Title: Antigenic determinants recognized by antibodies obtained using a pathogenic agent or derivative thereof that presents a restricted set of antigens

Inventors: Lyon, Chulay, Thomas, Howard, Weber


EUROPEAN PATENT OFFICE Patent Issue No. 0192626 on July 29, 1992

Title: Malaria circumsporozoite vaccine

Inventors: Ballou, Gross, Hockmeyer, Young


GERMAN Patent Issue No. P3686178.2 on July 29, 1992

Title: Malaria circumsporozoite vaccine

Inventors: Ballou, Gross, Hockmeyer, Young


SOUTH AFRICAN Patent Issue No. 86/0874 on December 30, 1996

Title: Malaria circumsporozoite vaccine

Inventors: Ballou, Gross, Hockmeyer, Young


U.S. Patent Issue No. 6,310,046 on October 30, 2001

Title: Sequestrin of Plasmodium falciparum

Inventors: Duffy, Ockenhouse


U.S. Patent Issue No. 6,541,815 on November 4, 2003

Title: Sequestrin

Inventors: Duffy, Ockenhouse


U.S. Patent Issue No. 6,855,322 on February 15, 2005

Title: Isolation and purification of P. falciparum merozoite protein-142 vaccine

Inventors: Lyon, Angov

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Patents." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11656.
×

U.S. Patent Issue No. 7,029,685 on April 18, 2006

Title: Plasmodium falciparum AMA-1 protein and uses thereof

Inventors: Lanar, Dutta, Ware, Nair

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Patents." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11656.
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Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Patents." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11656.
×
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Patents." Institute of Medicine. 2006. Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11656.
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Page 101
Next: Appendix E Scientific Advisory Board for DoD Malaria Vaccine Research and Development Program (Draft Charter) »
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Malaria is an infectious disease common to several parts of the world, including Africa, northern South America, and Asia. During their service in the military, U.S. active members may be sent to any part of the world, including parts of the world where Malaria is an issue. In Liberia in 2003, for example, there was a 28 percent attack rate in Marines who spent a short time ashore, and half of the 80 Marines affected needed to be evacuated to Germany. This was not only costly to the U.S. military but dangerous as well. To fight against this disease, there exists a Malaria Vaccine program in the U.S. military. However, there exists a variety of potential vaccine targets for the most severe and important form of malaria; malaria from the species Plasmodium falciparum. Issues also arise with the fact that there are three possible stages to create vaccines against—preerythrocytic, blood, or transmission.

The Department of Defense (DoD), through the commanding general of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), requested that the Institute of Medicine (IOM) conduct a programmatic review of the military Plasmodium falciparum malaria vaccine research and development program. There was to be a focus on vaccine against the preerythrocytic and blood stages. The IOM formed a committee of 11 experts with collective expertise in malaria vaccine research, parasite immunology, malarial biology, clinical trials and regulatory affairs, industrial and public-sector vaccine development, biologic products research and development (vaccinology), military research and development programs, tropical medicine, and public health.

The committee focused different tasks including determining whether the DoD malaria vaccine research and development program is scientifically sound and able to achieve the vaccine program objectives within specified timelines, recommending how to overcome significant, identified barriers, and identifying major strategic goals and timelines based on the material received and presentations made by the DoD's program representatives. Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program presents the committee's findings, current malaria vaccines, and recommendations for the development of the U.S. Military vaccine research.

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