National Academies Press: OpenBook

International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future (2007)

Chapter: Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs

« Previous: Appendix D A Brief History of Foreign Language Assessment in the United States
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs ." National Research Council. 2007. International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11841.
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Page 365
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs ." National Research Council. 2007. International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11841.
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Page 366
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs ." National Research Council. 2007. International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11841.
×
Page 367
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs ." National Research Council. 2007. International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11841.
×
Page 368
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs ." National Research Council. 2007. International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11841.
×
Page 369
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs ." National Research Council. 2007. International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11841.
×
Page 370
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs ." National Research Council. 2007. International Education and Foreign Languages: Keys to Securing America's Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11841.
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Page 371

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appendix E 365

TABLE E-1  Summary of Federal Foreign Language and Area Studies Programs 366 Number of Program Agency Purpose Description Funding Eligibility Participants Scholarship, Grant, Recruitment, and Exchange Programs Fulbright U.S. Department Increase mutual Scholarships and grants FY 2005 U.S. and foreign 6,000 per year; Program of State understanding between for exchange programs $144 M college students, about half the people of the as part of U.S. public teachers, are foreign United States and diplomacy efforts. Includes administrators, grantees. the people of other opportunities for U.S. academics, and other countries. college/graduate students, professionals; U.S. faculty, and professionals to institutions of higher study and lecture abroad and education. for their foreign counterparts to study in the United States. National U.S. Department Create a pipeline to Provides grants to FY 2005 $8M Graduate students From 1992- Security of Defense meet foreign language institutions to build capacity, studying a critical 2002 provided Education (National needs of national and scholarships to graduate language area, and grants to 1,650 Program Defense security-related and undergraduate students undergraduates undergraduates, University) agencies. for study abroad. Focuses on planning to study 850 graduate critical languages: Arabic, abroad in a critical students, and Chinese, Farsi, Hindi, language area. Must be 65 institutions Korean, Japanese, Russian, U.S. citizens and fulfill of higher and Turkish. service requirement education. after graduation. Institutions of higher education that have capacity to graduate 40 students annually in the critical languages.

Number of Program Agency Purpose Description Funding Eligibility Participants Fund for the U.S. Department Encourage cooperation Grants to U.S. institutions U.S. institutions of Over 220 active Improvement of Education between U.S. to create partnerships with higher education. grants. of Post- institutions of higher foreign counterparts in secondary education and those in a wide variety of areas, Education Brazil, the European including foreign language Union, Canada, and and area studies. Mexico. Foreign U.S. Department Support innovative, Grants to states and local FY 2005 $18M State and local Language of Education model foreign education agencies to FY 2006 will education agencies. Assistance language programs develop and implement probably be Program for elementary and foreign language teaching $22M secondary school methods that can be students. replicated elsewhere. Peace Corps Peace Corps Help developing Volunteers work for FY 2005 U.S. citizen at least 18 Approximately countries with training education and development $317M years of age. 7,800 and expertise, promote projects in partner countries volunteers and better understanding in a variety of fields; most trainees each of Americans, promote volunteers receive 10-12 year (2-year better understanding weeks of in-country language periods), so of other people and training as part of an 3,900 new nations by Americans. orientation program before volunteers each actual service begins. year. 367

TABLE E-1  Continued 368 Number of Program Agency Purpose Description Funding Eligibility Participants Gilman U.S. Department Better prepare U.S. Scholarships for U.S. Undergraduates Approximately International of State students from low- undergraduates of limited receiving Pell grant 350 recipients Scholarship income families to financial means to study funding; must be U.S. in 2004-2005. Program assume significant abroad, in areas other citizens. roles in global than Western Europe and economy. Australia. Title VIII U.S. Department Build expertise on Grants given to institutions, FY 2005 $4.6M U.S. institutions of Eight grantee Program of State Eurasia and Central which in turn, provide higher education organizations. and Eastern Europe. grants to individuals, usually and nonprofit graduate students and organizations. faculty, to pursue language training and research (often abroad). Stokes Various Recruitment, Provides college tuition, Varies. For language Educational intelligence particularly of books and fees, housing, program at National Scholarship agencies minorities, with skills travel, summer internship, Security Agency, Program critical to intelligence and then employment at a college sophomores community. federal agency. with 6 credits in a critical language; 3.0 grade point average; U.S. citizens. Must fulfill service requirement.

Number of Program Agency Purpose Description Funding Eligibility Participants Pat Roberts Various Recruitment of $25,000 one-year FY 2004 $8M U.S. citizens with 3.4 Up to 150 Intelligence intelligence graduate students scholarships for students in grade point average, scholarships Scholars agencies with skills critical critical languages, advanced must meet summer per year. Program to intelligence area expertise, physical internship requirement, community. sciences, and engineering. and 18-month service requirement upon graduation. Title VI/ U.S. Department Strengthen the Grants to institutions and FY 2005 Specific to each Fulbright- of Education capability and individuals to improve $107M component program. Hays performance of secondary and postsecondary Includes institutions American education teaching and research of higher education, in foreign languages concerning other cultures faculty, graduate and in area and and languages, through students, K-12 international studies. study abroad and domestic teachers. capacity-building. Abraham According to Ultimate goal is As yet, only a bipartisan $250,000 in FY U.S. citizens Goal for Lincoln the report of for 1,000,000 U.S. commission has been formed 2004 to form at graduate or 2011-2012 is 1 Study the commission, students to study to plan for this effort. The the commission. undergraduate level. million students Abroad the program abroad in 2016- commission was directed to The studying Fellowships may be housed 2017. About 650,000 report its recommendations commission’s abroad. (not yet at the State students are expected to Congress and the report funded) Department, to do so by that year, president in December 2005. recommends a ED, or at a so the program hopes $50M budget newly formed to assist students to for FY 2007, independent increase that figure to increase agency. by 50%, to reach to $125M in 1,000,000. 2011. 369

TABLE E-1  Continued 370 Number of Program Agency Purpose Description Funding Eligibility Participants Training Programs for Federal Personnel Defense U.S. Department Educate foreign Language classes at U.S. military personnel 3,000 students Language of Defense language specialists campus in Monterey, CA, and their dependents, per year at Institute for the Department and a smaller facility in reserves in the Monterey of Defense and other Washington, DC. Instruction National Guard, and campus. agencies. via video to 60 military employees of federal installations. agencies. Foreign U.S. Department Provide foreign Training at facility in FY 2003 $49M Foreign service officers Between 40,000 Service of State language, area Northern Virginia and and ambassadors; and 50,000 per Institute studies, and other overseas embassies. clerical, support, and year (but not training primarily for security personnel; all focused on diplomats. family members language or accompanying the area studies). above to overseas posts; and personnel from 40 other government agencies. National National Prepare military and Teaches language skills Civilian and military Cryptologic Security Agency civilian personnel for necessary for the National population of the School duty in cryptologic Security Agency’s code- National Security and related activities. breaking activities. Agency and partners throughout intelligence community.

Number of Program Agency Purpose Description Funding Eligibility Participants Special U.S. Department Provide soldiers with Language training at JFK FY 2004 Personnel in the Of 44,000 Operations of Defense foreign language Special Warfare Center and $11.1M Special Operations Special Forces (Army) proficiency necessary School at Fort Bragg, NC. Forces. Operations Language for current and Forces Office future operational personnel, requirements. about 12,000 are in positions that require language training. 371

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International Education and Foreign Languages reviews the Department of Education’s Title VI and Fulbright-Hays Programs, which provide higher education funding for international education and foreign language programs. This book offers a timely look at issues that are increasingly important in an interconnected world. It discusses the effect of the nation’s lack of expertise in foreign languages and cultural knowledge on national security and global competitiveness and it describes the challenges faced by the U.S. educational system and the federal government in trying to address those needs. The book also examines the federal government’s recent proposal to create a new National Security Language Initiative, the role of the Department of Education, and current efforts to hold higher education programs accountable. This book provides information and recommendations that can help universities, educators, and policy makers establish a system of foreign language and international education that is ready to respond to new and unanticipated challenges around the world.

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