National Academies Press: OpenBook

The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges (2007)

Chapter: B Panel Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
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Appendix B
Panel Biographical Information

Chairperson

Charles P. Casey (NAS) is Homer B. Adkins Professor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Casey’s research lies at the interface between organometallic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis, and his group studies the mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. He received his B.S. degree from St. Louis University and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Members

Joanna Aizenberg is a scientist with Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent. Her scientific interests are materials chemistry, biomineralization, biomimetics, multifunctional biomaterials, crystal engineering, nanofabrication, and control of crystal nucleation and growth. She has made seminal contributions to the understanding of the chemistry, structure, and function of biologically formed minerals and pioneered in the application of this knowledge to develop new, bio-inspired inorganic crystallization strategies. She received a Ph.D. from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel, and undergraduate and graduate degrees from Moscow State University, Moscow, USSR.


Paul S. Anderson is an internationally recognized leader in the field of drug discovery and development. During his 38-year career with Merck, Dupont-Merck, and most recently Bristol-Myers Squibb, Dr. Anderson was

Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
×

instrumental in the discovery of several of the most successful pharmaceutical products including Zocor for high cholesterol; Trusopt, for glaucoma; Aggrastat, for unstable angina; and Crixivan and Sustiva, for HIV/AIDS. Dr. Anderson obtained his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Vermont and a Ph.D. from the University of New Hampshire.


Louis E. Brus (NAS) is a professor of chemistry at Columbia University. He has been a pioneer in the synthesis, size control, and spectroscopy of nanometer-scale semiconductor crystallites. His elucidation of quantum-size effects in these materials is central to our understanding of the transition between molecular and bulk behavior. He received a B.S. in chemical physics from Rice University and his Ph.D. in chemical physics from Columbia University.


Sylvia T. Ceyer (NAS) is the J. C. Sheehan Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Ceyer is a physical chemist with research interests in the area of molecule-surface reaction dynamics as related to heterogeneous catalysis, chemical vapor deposition, and plasma etching chemistry. She has uncovered sources of the apparent lack of surface reactivity under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions and then used that knowledge to effect high-pressure heterogeneous catalytic reactions in an ultrahigh-vacuum environment where microscopic reaction steps can be discerned. She received a B.A. from Hope College and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.


Gregory R. Choppin joined the faculty at Florida State University in 1956 and from 1968 to 1976 served as chairman of the Department of Chemistry. He is a Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Florida State University. He received his B.S. degree in chemistry from Loyola University of the South and his Ph.D. from the University of Texas in Austin. His major research interests are inorganic and nuclear chemistry with emphasis on the lanthanide and actinide elements. Potentiometry, calorimetry, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, and optical spectroscopy are among the methods used in his laboratory to study the thermodynamics and kinetics of complexation and redox behavior of these elements. A major focus of his laboratory is on the separation science of actinides and the environmental speciation of actinides by inorganic and organic ligands.


Catherine C. Fenselau is a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park. She has been a pioneer in the application of mass spectrometry in biomedical research. Her current interests include the use of proteomic strategies to investigate cellular mechanisms of acquired drug resistance and as the basis for detection and analysis of

Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
×

microorganisms in the “detect to protect” time frame. She received her A.B. from Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. from Stanford University.


Joanna S. Fowler (NAS) is a senior chemist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Fowler has been a major contributor to brain research and the study of diseases such as addiction, which she has investigated using the imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET). In 1976 she and her colleagues synthesized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, a radiotracer used in PET. Dr. Fowler earned a B.S. from the University of South Florida and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado, Boulder.


Joseph S. Francisco is a professor of chemistry at Purdue University. His research focuses on basic studies in spectroscopy, kinetics, and photochemistry of novel transient species in the gas phase. Dr. Francisco received his B.S. from the University of Texas, Austin, and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Timothy E. Long is a professor of chemistry at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His efforts are focused on the synthesis and characterization of novel macromolecules using unique combinations of step-growth and chain polymerization processes. He received a B.S. from St. Bonaventure University and a Ph.D. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.


Tobin J. Marks (NAS) is the Charles E. and Emma H. Morrison Professor and Vladimir N. Iptieff Professor of Chemistry at Northwestern University. Through landmark synthetic, mechanistic, and thermodynamic investigations, he and his students opened a new portion of the Periodic Table to organometallic chemistry. He has also made major advances in solid state, polymer, bioinorganic, and boron hydride chemistry and in photochemical isotope separation. He received his B.S. from the University of Maryland and his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Michele Parrinello is chair of computational science at the Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH, Zürich. Professor Parrinello’s scientific interests are strongly interdisciplinary and include the study of complex chemical reactions, hydrogen-bonded systems, catalysis, and materials science. Together with Roberto Car, he introduced the abinitio molecular dynamics method, which he is still developing and applying. This method, which goes under the name of Car-Parrinello method, represents the beginning of a new field and has dramatically influenced the field of electronic structure calculations for solids, liquids, and molecules. Born in Messina, Italy,

Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
×

Dr. Parrinello obtained his Ph.D. in physics in from University of Bologna, Italy.


Chi-Huey Wong (NAS) is currently the President of Academia Sinica in Taiwan and Professor of Chemistry at Scripps Research Institute. Dr. Wong’s principal research interests are in carbohydrate chemistry and how chemistry can be used to modify enzymes to increase or decrease enzymatic function and create better biologically active compounds. The work of his research group thus has major implications for improving human health with safer and more effective substances, such as natural products of biomedical importance. He graduated from National Taiwan University with a B.S. degree in chemistry and from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in chemistry.

Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
×
Page 128
Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
×
Page 129
Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
×
Page 130
Suggested Citation:"B Panel Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2007. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11866.
×
Page 131
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Chemistry plays a key role in conquering diseases, solving energy problems, addressing environmental problems, providing the discoveries that lead to new industries, and developing new materials and technologies for national defense and homeland security. However, the field is currently facing a crucial time of change and is struggling to position itself to meet the needs of the future as it expands beyond its traditional core toward areas related to biology, materials science, and nanotechnology.

At the request of the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Research Council conducted an in-depth benchmarking analysis to gauge the current standing of the U.S. chemistry field in the world. The Future of U.S. Chemistry Research: Benchmarks and Challenges highlights the main findings of the benchmarking exercise.

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