National Academies Press: OpenBook

Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289 (2007)

Chapter: Study Committee Biographical Information

« Previous: APPENDIX B: Summary of Highway Safety Core Competencies from NCHRP Research Results Digest 302
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2007. Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12019.
×
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2007. Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12019.
×
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2007. Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12019.
×
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2007. Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12019.
×
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2007. Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12019.
×
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2007. Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12019.
×
Page 100

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Study Committee Biographical Information Kam K. Movassaghi, Chair, is President of C. H. Fenstermaker and Asso- ciates, Inc., in Lafayette, Louisiana. The company provides engineering and environment consulting services and is one of the largest surveying and mapping firms in the United States. He is also the President and CEO of Movassaghi Group, PEC, in Baton Rouge. Before taking these positions in 2004, he was Secretary of the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development. During his 6 years of service as Secretary, he imple- mented a comprehensive management plan that emphasized the role of highway safety in investment decisions. He began his career as a design engineer in several civil engineering firms before joining the faculty at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette (formerly Southwestern Louisiana in Lafayette). He served as head of the Department of Civil Engineering at the university, where he expanded programs in research and developed a graduate engineering management program. He was a member of the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB’s) Executive Committee from 2003 to 2004. His awards and honors include the President Award of Merit, Louisiana Engineering Society (2004); Highway Safety Award, Louisiana Highway Safety Commission (2004); National Government Engineer of the Year, American Society of Civil Engineers (2002); Engi- neering Faculty Professionalism Award, Louisiana Engineering Society (1997); and Outstanding Civil Engineer of the Year, Louisiana Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (1995). He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Louisiana Engineering Society, Phi Kappa Phi, Chi Epsilon, and Sigma Xi. He received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Louisiana, Lafayette, in 1963 and earned a master of science degree and a PhD in civil engineering from Louisiana State University in 1965 and 1971, respectively. 95

96 Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector John H. Daly is Manager Director of the Genesee County Road Com- mission in Flint, Michigan. In this capacity, he is the Chief Administrative Officer of the fifth-largest road construction and maintenance agency in Michigan. The commission administers 1,800 miles of highway and employs more than 200 people. Before joining the commission in 1999 he was City Manager of Three Rivers, Michigan, and Executive Director of the St. Joseph County Housing Rehabilitation Authority. He has also been Manager of Fayette, Ohio. He serves on the Board of Directors and is past President of the County Road Association of Michigan. He is a charter member of the Michigan Transportation Research Board and is active in the National Association of County Engineers. He retired from the U.S. Marine Corps. He earned a BA from Texas A&M University, an MS in systems management from the University of Southern California, an MS in systems technology from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, and a PhD in administration and management from Walden University, Minneapolis, Minnesota. T. Bella Dinh-Zarr is Director of the North America Make Roads Safe Campaign. She was previously the National Director of Traffic Safety Policy for the American Automobile Association (AAA). She joined AAA in March 2002 as lead scientist and public spokesperson for the organi- zation’s traffic safety activities. She trained with the Cochrane Collabo- ration Injury Group in London and was a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Fellow and member of the CDC’s motor vehicle team for the U.S. Guide to Community Preventive Services. She has been a Research Associate at the Texas Transportation Institute and a Scien- tist at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Her research interests include seat belt policies, alcohol-related injuries, and senior mobility. She cochairs the Aging and Mobility Roundtable attended by leaders in the fields of transportation and aging and was a Presiden- tial Appointee to the 2005 White House Conference on Aging Advisory Committee. She is a member of the TRB Committees on Safe Mobility of Older Persons, Occupant Protection, and Traffic Safety in Developing Countries. She was awarded the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Award, the CDC Outstanding Scientific Contribu- tion to Public Health Award, and the NHTSA Recognition Award. She has a BA from Rice University and an MPH and a PhD in health policy

Study Committee Biographical Information 97 and injury prevention from the University of Texas School of Public Health. Susan B. Herbel is Senior Associate for Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Her areas of expertise are transportation safety planning, program develop- ment, and evaluation. She has worked extensively on developing and implementing strategies associated with the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century requirement for integrating safety as a priority in the transportation planning process. She chairs the TRB Subcommittee on Highway Safety Workforce Development and the National Cooper- ative Highway Research Program panel that is developing benefit–cost analyses for human factors–oriented highway safety countermeasures. She is a member of the TRB Women’s Issues in Transportation Com- mittee and Transportation Safety Management Committee. She formed the Network of Employers for Traffic Safety, a nonprofit organization that provides advice and consultation on employee safety to private companies and government agencies. She has a BA in political science from Kansas State University, an MPA from the University of Oklahoma, and a PhD in public policy from the University of Oklahoma. Paul P. Jovanis is Professor in the Department of Civil and Environ- mental Engineering at the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania. He was Department Head from 1997 to 2001. Before joining Penn State, he was Professor and Chair in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Davis. He was Associate Director of the Institute of Transportation Stud- ies at UC Davis from 1992 to 1997. He began his career on the faculty of Northwestern University. His main areas of safety-related research are in modeling accident occurrence, driver fatigue, the safety consequences and risk perception of in-vehicle technologies, and older driver mobility and safety. He holds a BE in electrical engineering from the Stevens Insti- tute of Technology and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Lowell M. Porter is Director of the Washington Traffic Safety Commis- sion (WTSC), which is responsible for coordinating and managing all government funding for traffic safety in Washington State. The com- mission funds traffic safety initiatives at the municipal, county, tribal,

98 Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector and state levels and is responsible for compiling and analyzing traffic safety data on crashes, roadway engineering, and public health trends to support safety initiatives and legislation to improve traffic safety. As director of WTSC, he is the Governor’s Highway Safety Representative to the U.S. Department of Transportation, NHTSA, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Before becoming director, he was Chief of the Washington State Patrol. He began his career as a state trooper in 1980. He earned a BA in business administration from City University, Washington State, and is completing course work for an MA from Gonzaga University. H. Douglas Robertson retired in 2005 as Director of the Highway Safety Research Center at the University of North Carolina (UNC). He has extensive experience in transportation safety, engineering, and educa- tion. He was a Research Associate Professor in the Health Behavior and Health Education Department of the UNC School of Public Health and holds an adjunct faculty position with UNC’s Department of City and Regional Planning. He is also an Inter-Institutional Adjunct faculty member in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at North Carolina State University. Having worked in the public and private sectors and academia, he has a broad perspective on past, present, and future transportation safety needs and services. He has served in numerous professional positions, including researcher, profes- sor, vice president, and regional manager. He has a BS in civil engineer- ing from Clemson University, an MS in transportation engineering from the University of South Carolina, and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of Maryland. Thomas J. Songer is Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the Univer- sity of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health. He is also a faculty member of the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Injury Research and Control. His areas of research interest include medical conditions and motor vehicle injury, diabetes and motor vehicle crashes, and the med- ical costs of motor vehicle crashes. He is the principal investigator of sev- eral studies related to injury prevention in transportation. In one study, he is examining wheelchair use and injury risks in transportation settings. In another study, he is investigating motor vehicle crashes by persons

Study Committee Biographical Information 99 with Type 1 diabetes to examine crash risks and identify factors related to crashes. He has published papers in the Journal of the American Med- ical Association, Risk Analysis, the American Journal of Preventive Medi- cine, and Diabetes Care. He holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame, a master’s degree in public health from the University of Pittsburgh, and a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Pitts- burgh. He also holds a master’s degree in health planning and finance from the London School of Economics. Peter F. Sweatman is Director of the University of Michigan Trans- portation Research Institute (UMTRI), a position he has held since Sep- tember 2004. His expertise and research interests are in the areas of heavy vehicle interaction with infrastructure and highway infrastructure pol- icy development. His work is widely recognized in the fields of vehicle design and engineering, vehicle and road safety, driver performance, and heavy vehicle standards and regulation. Before joining UMTRI, he was Founder and Managing Director of Roaduser Systems Pty., Ltd., of Australia. He was Chief Scientist at the Australian Road Research Board and Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne. He was elected to the board of the Driver Education Centre of Australia and served as President of the International Forum for Road Transport Technology. He earned a BE and a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Melbourne. Richard Tay is Professor and Research Chair for Road Safety in the Department of Civil Engineering and Adjunct Professor for Injury Pre- vention in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the Uni- versity of Calgary in Alberta, Canada. He is also an Adjunct Professor in Road Safety at the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety in the School of Psychology at Queensland University of Technology in Australia. He has extensive international experience in transport eco- nomics and policy and has lectured at Nanyang Technological Univer- sity in Singapore, the Chinese University in Hong Kong, and Lincoln University in New Zealand. He was a visiting scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research and teaching involve the application of engineering, health, economics, marketing, psychology, and statistical models to analyze road crashes and evaluate road safety policies and pro- grams as well as the development, implementation, and evaluation of

100 Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector multidisciplinary measures to improve road safety. He has a BS in elec- trical engineering from Texas Tech University, an MS in engineering eco- nomic systems from Stanford University, and a PhD in economics from Purdue University. Thomas M. Welch is the Chief Safety Engineer of the Iowa Department of Transportation and chairs the Iowa Safety Management System, which is a multidisciplinary and multiagency partnership of public- and private- sector entities concerned with highway safety. He also manages several other highway safety programs including the Iowa Department of Trans- portation Traffic Safety Research Program, highlighted by the Federal Highway Administration in its 2002 report on Best Practices in Highway Safety Programs. He has taught courses in highway design and transporta- tion planning at Iowa State University. He is a member of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Standing Committee on Highway Traffic Safety and the TRB Committees on Transportation Safety Management and Safety Data, Analysis, and Eval- uation. He was awarded the 2004 AASHTO President’s Special Award of Merit in recognition of “outstanding leadership, innovation and dedica- tion to strategic highway safety initiatives in Iowa and across America.” He has a BS in civil engineering from the University of Wisconsin and an MS in transportation engineering from Iowa State University.

Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector: Special Report 289 Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!

TRB Special Report 289: Building the Road Safety Profession in the Public Sector examines the growing need for experts at all levels of government to develop and implement systems- and science-based approaches to road safety management. According to the committee that authored the report, the lack of professional recognition and comprehensive road safety education and training opportunities is threatening the ability of public agencies to build the knowledgeable and skilled road safety workforce that is needed to make safety advances. To address this need, the report recommends that the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials and the Governors Highway Safety Association forge a broad-based alliance of public, private, and educational organizations to champion the road safety profession. The report recommends that the alliance encourage states to take advantage of federal workforce training funds for the purpose of developing road safety professionals and to advocate comprehensive road safety education and training by universities, including the many publicly funded transportation and safety research centers. In addition, the report urges the alliance to explore the creation of one or more specialized institutes to provide comprehensive instruction and training for road safety professionals.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!