National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 8 Conclusions
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 264
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 265
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 266
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 267
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 268
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 269
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 270
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 271
Suggested Citation:"Index." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12183.
×
Page 272

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Index A B Abrams tanks, 15, 93–94, 96–97 Background, 13–22 ventilation in, 16, 95 dose-response modeling and risk Absorption, 25–27 assessment, 20–21 increased by skin excoriation, 27 exposure of military personnel to depleted skin, 27 uranium, 14–16 via deep wounds, 27 radiologic and chemical effects of exposure Accuracy impairment (A-IIac), 209 to depleted uranium, 17–20 Acute lymphocytic leukemia, 107 uses of depleted uranium, 14 Acute myeloid leukemia, 107 Balkans studies, 151–153 Aerosols, inhalable, 93–94 Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center Afghanistan. See Operation Enduring Freedom (BVAMC), 15, 97, 143–151, 204, in Afghanistan 209–210, 212 A-IIac. See Accuracy impairment Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), 145, 147, Alpha particles, 17 209 Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 114 Becquerel (Bq), 17 Animal studies. See Nonhuman studies Beta particles, 18 Association Bias defining, 75 control of, 82–83 tests of, 81–82 studies vulnerable to, 86 Asthma, 113–114 Biokinetic models of exposure, 25 Atomic Weapons Establishment workers, Biologic plausibility, 80 142 of neurologic effects, 36 Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Biomarkers, 80, 160 Metrics Test Library, 148 Biotransformation, 27 263

264 INDEX Birth defects, and other adverse reproductive Categories of strength of association, 90–91 outcomes, 114–115 inadequate/insufficient evidence to Bladder cancer, 109–110, 199 determine whether an association exists, Blood-brain barrier, 31 4, 91, 195–202, 207, 209–211, 214–215 BNFL. See British Nuclear Fuels PLC limited/suggestive evidence of an Bone, a primary reservoir of uranium, 28–29 association, 4, 91 Bone cancer, 108–109, 153, 198 limited/suggestive evidence of no Bosnia-Herzegovina war, 14, 16, 153 association, 4, 91 Bq. See Becquerel origin of, 90 Bradley fighting vehicles, 15, 93, 95, 97 sufficient evidence of a causal relationship, Brain and other central nervous system cancers, 4, 90 110, 200 sufficient evidence of an association, 4, 91 Brain lipid oxidation, 35 Causation Brain regions, accumulation in, 28 defining, 75 Breast cancer, 106 true cause-effect association, 80 British Nuclear Fuels PLC (BNFL), 136–137, CEDR. See Comprehensive Epidemiology Data 204 Resource Bronchial cancer, 123 Cell toxicity, evaluating, 80 BVAMC. See Baltimore Veterans Affairs Central nervous system cancers, 110, 200 Medical Center Chemical effects, of exposure to depleted uranium, 17–20 Chemical toxicity, 19–20 C Chest X-ray testing, 114 Chondrosarcoma, 109 Camp Doha fire, 15, 94–95 Chordoma, 109 Cancer Chromosomal aberrations, 30–31 biological latency of, 80 Chronic bronchitis, 113 causes of, 105 Chronic kidney disease (CKD), 111 incidence of, 193 Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 107 Cancer outcomes, 105–111, 193–203 Chronic myeloid leukemia, 107 bladder cancer, 109–110, 199 Chronic nephritis, 132, 203–204 bone cancer, 108–109, 153, 198 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease brain and other central nervous system (COPD), 113–114 cancers, 110, 200 CKD. See Chronic kidney disease in depleted-uranium–exposed animals, Cleft lip and palate, 114 29–30 Clinical end points of interest, 105–116 leukemias, 107, 196 cancer outcomes, 105–111 lung cancer, 88–89, 106–107, 123, noncancer outcomes, 111–115 126–135, 138, 194–196 Clinical outcomes, adverse, 81 lymphomas, 107–108, 197–198 Coexposures, 83–84 male genital cancers, 111, 201–202 to other agents, 89 other cancers, 203 synergism, 83–84 renal cancer, 109, 132, 198–199 Cohort descriptions, 117–192 stomach cancer, 110, 134, 200–201 depleted-uranium studies, 143–153 Capstone report, 16, 24, 93–96, 98, 208 environmental-exposure studies, 153–163 Carcinogenic effects, 29–30 summary, 163–190 Cardiovascular effects, 39, 126, 212 uranium-processing cohorts, 118–143 Case-control studies, 75, 85–86 Cohort studies, 75, 84–85 nested, 86, 130, 161, 163 prospective, 85 retrospective, 133 retrospective, 83, 85, 135, 140, 151 Case reports and case series, 87 Colon cancer, 156

INDEX 265 Colorado Plateau uranium-mill workers, DOD. See US Department of Defense 119–123, 203, 208, 212 DOE. See US Department of Energy Committee Dose reconstruction, 89 approach to its charge, 3–4 Dose-response modeling and risk assessment, charge to, 3 20–21, 79, 128, 131–132, 139, 159, 195 task of, 10 Dosimeter, thermoluminescent, 100 Comparison-group issues, in study populations, Down syndrome, 114 77 Drinking water and residential exposure, 206 Comprehensive Epidemiology Data Resource Dupree-Ellis et al., 2000, 198, 200, 203 (CEDR), 124–125 Dusts, uranium-particle-containing, 25 Computerized Occupational Referent Population System (CORPS), 126 Conclusions, 193–262 E cancer outcomes, 193–203 noncancer outcomes, 203–214 Ecologic studies, 87 summary, 214–215 Effective dose equivalent, 19 Conditional logistic regression, 130 Egyptian processors, 142–143, 207 Confidence interval, 204 Electromagnetic separation, 127 Control of bias, 82–83 Emphysema, 113, 123, 126 information bias, 83 End Stage Renal Disease Program Management selection bias, 77, 83 and Medical Information System COPD. See Chronic obstructive pulmonary (ESRD), 122–123 disease Environmental-exposure studies CORPS. See Computerized Occupational cohort descriptions, 153–163 Referent Population System Finnish well-water studies, 157–163 Cox proportional-hazard models, 140 residential studies, 153–157 Cox regression analyses, 141 Environmental monitoring, 80 Cross-sectional studies, 75, 86–87 Epidemiologic studies controlling for risk factors, 75 principal objectives of, 75–76 D Epidemiologic-study designs, 84–87 case-control studies, 85–86 Danish Cancer Society, 152 case reports and case series, 87 Death-certificate data, 113, 119–121, 127–128, cohort studies, 84–85 132, 137 cross-sectional studies, 86–87 Depleted Uranium Follow-up Program, 15, ecologic studies, 87 143–144, 148, 209–210, 212 ESRD. See End Stage Renal Disease Program Depleted-uranium studies Management and Medical Information Balkans studies, 151–153 System Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, EUROCAT Protocol, 153 15, 143–151 Ewing tumor, 109 cohort descriptions, 143–153 Excretion and retention, 28–29 UK Gulf War studies, 151 Exposure assessment, 77–80, 93–103. See Deposition pattern in the human body, Levels I, II, III especially airways, 89 classifying workers by maximum exposure, Dermal effects, 40 78–79 Developmental studies. See Reproductive and direct measurement in individual workers, 78 developmental studies estimation of exposure to depleted uranium Direct measurement, in individual workers, during the Gulf War, 93–100 78, 95 exposure-monitoring methods, 100–102 Disease occurrence, 86–87 exposure of military personnel to depleted Distribution issues, 27–28 uranium, 14–16

266 INDEX other methods of estimating exposures, H 79–80 self-reporting in, 79 Half-life, radioactive, 17 using work history to model cumulative Hazard ratios (HRs), 161–163 exposure, 78 Healthy-warrior effect, 77, 85 Healthy-worker effect, 77, 204 Heavy-armor tanks, 14. See also individual F vehicle listings Hematologic effects, 41, 213 False-negative results, 79 Hematopoietic cancer, 123, 134 Fernald Feed Materials Production Center Hepatotoxicity, 36–37 (FFMPC) workers, 97, 123–126, 133, Hodgkin lymphoma, 107, 121, 123, 152, 197 156, 206, 208, 212 HPRT mutation frequency, 148–150 Fernald Resident Medical Monitoring Program HRs. See Hazard ratios (FMMP), 156–157 Human Respiratory Tract Model, 101 FFMPC. See Fernald Feed Materials Production Center Fibrosarcoma, 109 I Finnish well-water studies, 157–163 FMMP. See Fernald Resident Medical IARC. See International Agency for Research Monitoring Program on Cancer Friendly-fire incidents, 94 ICP-MS. See Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry Immune system effects, 38–39, 213 G In vitro models, 24 to assess neurologic effects, 33–34 Gamma rays, 18 In vivo models, to assess neurologic effects, Gastric cancer, 110 34–36 Gastrointestinal effects, 36 Inadequate/insufficient evidence to determine absorption of uranium, 26 whether an association exists, 4, 91, Genitourinary diseases, 204 195–202, 207, 209–211, 214–215 Genotoxic effects, 26, 30–31, 147, Inclusion criteria, 88 212 Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry tests for, 148 (ICP-MS), 26, 28, 31, 33–35 Geographic proximity modeling, 80 Information bias, 83 German peacekeeping personnel, 16 Information-gathering strategy, 73–74 Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), 111–112 Inhalation studies, 26 Greenham Common US Air Force base, Interaction. See Synergism 153 Internal comparison groups, 77 Gulf War and Health, Volume 1: Depleted Internal dose, of radiation, 78 Uranium, Pyridostigmine Bromide, International Agency for Research on Cancer Sarin, Vaccines, 2–5, 9–10, 24, 27, (IARC), 75, 90 29–32, 36–41, 73, 88–89, 117–118, 144, International Classification of Diseases 193, 195, 203, 207–208 ICD-6, 120 summary of findings in the section on ICD-8, 127–128 depleted uranium in, 9 ICD-9, 122, 151, 156–157 Gulf War veterans, 3, 7–8, 14, 20–21, 30, 76, ICD-10, 107–108 81, 93, 97–98, 106, 114, 117–118, International Classification of Diseases 143–144, 146, 148–151, 193, 201–203, Adapted for Use in the United States, 209–210, 212–213 ICDA-8, 130 depleted-uranium surveillance study of, International Commission on Radiological 204–206 Protection, 13, 25, 102, 140, 162

INDEX 267 International Red Cross and Red Crescent Medical Subject Heading (MeSH), 73 Movement, 16 Metallotoxic effects, 31 Intervention strategies, 20 Metastasis, from other primary cancers, 131 Italian Ministry of Defense, 152 Methodology, 73–92 categories of strength of association, 90–91 considerations in statistical inference, 81–84 K epidemiologic-study designs, 84–87 exposure assessment, 77–80 Kidneys, a primary reservoir of uranium, 28–29 factors influencing the relevance and quality Kinetic-energy cartridges and ammunition of studies, 76–84 rounds, 2, 14 inclusion criteria, 88 Kosovo war, 2, 14, 16 information-gathering strategy, 73–74 Kuwait, invasion of, 7 outcome assessment, 80–81 principal objectives of epidemiologic studies, 75 L rationale for not including studies of Leukemias, 107, 196 uranium miners, 88–90 Level I exposure, 15, 94 study populations, 76–77 Level II exposure, 15, 94, 98–100 Monson’s life-table analysis, 125 Level III exposure, 15–16, 94–95, 117 Morbidity, 204–207 Life Table Analysis System (LTAS) drinking water and residential exposure, 206 modified, 120–122 Gulf War veterans depleted-uranium Monson’s, 125 surveillance study, 204–206 Limited/suggestive evidence of an association, occupational uranium exposure, 206–207 4, 91 Mortality, 113, 119, 123, 129–131, 133, 135, Limited/suggestive evidence of no association, 138–139, 141, 203–204 4, 91 all-cause, 81, 126–127 Linear no-threshold model, validity of, 21 cause-specific, 120, 128 Linear regression, 143, 160 patterns of, 118 Longitudinal studies, 84 Motor vehicle department records (state), 128, LTAS. See Life Table Analysis System 134 Lung cancer, 88–89, 106–107, 123, 126–135, Musculoskeletal effects, 40–41 138, 194–196 Mutations, 105. See also HPRT mutation Lymphatic cancer, 123, 134 frequency Lymphomas, 107–108, 197–198. See also Hodgkin lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin lymphoma N Lymphosarcoma, 123 National Center for Health Statistics, 154 National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 98 M National Death Index (NDI), 122, 125, 130, Male genital cancers, 111, 201–202 132, 139 Malignant fibrous histiocytoma, 109 National Health and Nutrition Examination Malignant neoplasms, 126 Survey, 111 Mallinckrodt Chemical Workers (MCW), National Health Interview Survey, 209 131–133, 203, 212 National Health Services Central Register MCW. See Mallinckrodt Chemical Workers (NHSCR), 136–138, 151 Mechanism-of-action studies, 23 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Mechanisms of toxicity, radiologic vs chemical, Health (NIOSH), 121–122, 124, 126, 89 134

268 INDEX National Report on Human Exposure to O Environmental Chemicals, 101 National Research Council, 16, 20, 24, 96, 162, Oak Ridge nuclear facilities workers, 126–131, 208 194, 204 National Technical Information Service, 73 Occupational studies, 84 NDI. See National Death Index of uranium exposure, 206–207 Nephrotoxic effects, 208 Ocular effects, 40 Nested case-control studies, 86, 130, 161, 163 Office for National Statistics (ONS), Neurobehavioral and neurocognitive effects, 136–138 114 Office of the Special Assistant for Gulf War Neurocognitive tests, 147 Illnesses, 15 Neurologic effects, 32–36, 114, 209–210 OIF. See Operation Iraqi Freedom biologic plausibility, 36 ONS. See Office for National Statistics in vitro models to assess, 33–34 Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, 9 in vivo models to assess, 34–36 Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), 2, 9, 14, 76, Neuronal lethality, 33 117, 144 Neuropsychologic tests, 146 Osteosarcoma, 109 NHANES III. See Third National Health and Outcome assessment, 80–81 Nutrition Examination Survey adequate followup period, 80–81 NHIS. See US National Health Interview Study adverse clinical outcomes, 81 NHL. See Non-Hodgkin lymphoma biological plausibility, 80 NHSCR. See National Health Services Central biomarkers, 80 Register Outcomes, 105–116, 193–262 NIOSH. See National Institute for Occupational cancer outcomes, 105–111, 193–203 Safety and Health noncancer outcomes, 111–115, 203–214 Noncancer outcomes, 111–115, 203–214 specificity of, 81 birth defects and other adverse reproductive summary, 214–215 outcomes, 114–115 neurobehavioral and neurocognitive effects, 114 P neurologic effects, 114, 209–210 p values, 82 nonmalignant renal disease, 111–112, Pension Benefit Information, 132 203–208 Persian Gulf War. See Gulf War veterans nonmalignant respiratory disease, 113–114, Persian Gulf War Veterans Act, 1, 7 208–209 Person-years at risk (PYARs), 134–135, 142 other health outcomes, 211–214 Peyer’s patches, 26, 29 reproductive and developmental effects, Pharmacokinetics, of uranium, 28 210–211 Phosphate-fertilizer production workers, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), 107–108, 197 134–135 Nonhuman studies, 23–24, 29–30 Physicochemical properties, differences in, 89 Nonmalignant renal disease, 111–112, 203–208 Pleura, cancer of, 138 conclusion, 207–208 Pneumoconiosis, 113, 123 morbidity, 204–207 Pneumonia, 113 mortality, 203–204 Poisson regression analysis, 128–129 Nonmalignant respiratory disease, 113–114, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment facility 122–123, 208–209 workers, 133–134 North Atlantic Treaty Organization, 14 Prevalence odds ratios, 86–87 No-threshold model, linear, 21 Prospective cohort studies, 85 Nuclear-fuels fabrication workers, 135–136 Prostatic cancer, 106, 111, 142, 201–202 Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 140 PubMed, 73 Null hypotheses, 81–82

INDEX 269 Pulmonary fibrosis, uranium’s ability to induce, Rocketdyne/Atomics International (RAI) 30–31 workers, 139–141, 212 PYARs. See Person-years at risk Royal Society report, 16, 93–96, 98, 100 RRs. See Risk ratios R S Radiation estimates of risk, 19 Sandia report, 93–96, 98, 100 film badges measuring, 78, 100, 132 Savannah River Plant workers, 141–142, internal dose of, 78 204 Radioactive decay, 17 SCEs. See Sister-chromatid exchanges Radioactivity, 17 Selection bias, 77, 83 Radiogenic-cancer risk estimation, 20 Self-reporting, 79 Radiologic considerations, 17–19 Sievert, 19 Radiologic effects, of exposure to depleted SIRs. See Standardized incidence ratios uranium, 17–20 Sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), 212 Radiologic vs chemical mechanisms of toxicity, Skeletal effects, 213 89 Sleep-wake cycle disturbances, 35 RAI. See Rocketdyne/Atomics International Smoking, a confounding variable, 89 workers SMRs. See Standardized mortality ratios RCCs. See Renal-cell carcinomas Springfields processing plant, 201 Rectal cancer, 156 Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), 135, 152, Regression analyses, 146 155, 198, 202 Cox, 141 Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), 77, REM sleep, 35–36 81, 85, 120–122, 128–142, 154–155, Renal cancer, 109, 132, 198–199 194–196, 198 Renal-cell carcinomas (RCCs), 109 cause-specific, 135 Renal disease, 157 Statistical inference, 81–84 Renal dysfunction, evaluating, 80 coexposures, 83–84 Renal effects, 31–32 control of bias, 82–83 Renal toxicants, 19–20 the p value, 82 Reproductive and developmental studies, tests of association, 81–82 37–38, 145, 210–211 type I and type II, 82 multigenerational, 39 Stomach cancer, 110, 134, 200–201 Residential studies, 100, 153–157 Structure-activity relationships, 23 Respiratory effects, 31 Study populations, 76–77 neoplasms, 129 comparison-group issues, 77 Reticulosarcoma, 123 relevance to veteran populations, 76 Retrospective case-control studies, 133 Sufficient evidence of a causal relationship, Retrospective cohort studies, 83, 85, 135, 140, 4, 90 151 Sufficient evidence of an association, Review of Toxicologic and Radiologic Risks to 4, 91 Military Personnel from Exposure to Summary, 1–5, 214–215 Depleted Uranium During and After of findings in the section on depleted Combat, 16, 24, 208 uranium in Gulf War and Health, Risk estimates, 20–21 Volume 1, 9 of radiation, 19 Swedish Armed Forces, 151 Risk ratios (RRs), 84, 131, 136–138, 141, 155, Swedish Cancer Registry, 152 198 Swedish Rescue Services Agency, 151–152 Risk transfer, 89 Synergism, 83–84, 89

270 INDEX T Uranium, 13 accumulations of, 28 Tennessee Eastman Corporation (TEC), isotopes of, 18–19 126–127, 133 naturally occurring, 101 Test statistics, 82 pharmacokinetics of, 28 Testicular cancer, 106, 111, 138, 202 Uranium intoxication, 40 Tests of association, 81–82 Uranium miners’ studies Texas Department of Health, 155 coexposures to other agents, 89 Third National Health and Nutrition deposition pattern in the human body, Examination Survey (NHANES III), especially airways, 89 157 differences in physicochemical properties, Thyroid diseases, 157 89 Toxicity studies, 29–41 radiological vs chemical mechanisms of application of the toxicologic data, toxicity, 89 41–66 rationale for not including, 88–90 carcinogenic effects, 29–30 Uranium-processing cohorts, 118–143 cardiovascular effects, 39 Atomic Weapons Establishment workers, dermal effects, 40 142 gastrointestinal effects, 36 Colorado Plateau uranium-mill workers, genotoxic effects, 30–31 119–123 hematologic effects, 41 Egyptian processors, 142–143 hepatotoxicity, 36–37 Fernald Feed Materials Production Center immune system effects, 38–39 workers, 123–126 musculoskeletal effects, 40–41 Mallinckrodt Chemical Workers, 131–132 neurologic effects, 32–36 nuclear-fuels fabrication workers, 135–136 ocular effects, 40 Oak Ridge nuclear facilities workers, renal effects, 31–32 126–131 reproductive and developmental effects, phosphate-fertilizer production workers, 37–38 134–135 respiratory effects, 31 Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment facility as secondary information sources, 42 workers, 133–134 summary of previous report, 24 Rocketdyne/Atomics International workers, Toxicokinetics, 25–29. See also Mechanisms 139–141 of toxicity Savannah River Plant workers, 141–142 absorption, 25–27 United Kingdom processors, 136–137 distribution issues, 27–28 workers at four uranium-processing excretion and retention, 28–29 operations, 133 transport and biotransformation, 27 US Army, 2, 14, 16, 24, 208 Toxicology, 23–72 US Congress, 1 Toxicology Literature Online (TOXLINE), 73 US Department of Defense (DOD), 2, 15, 94, Tracheal cancer, 123 144 Transport and biotransformation, 27 US Department of Energy (DOE), 16, 97, 124, Type I and type II statistical inference, 82 140 US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), 1, 7, 143 U request for this study, 9–10 US Environmental Protection Agency, 38 Union Carbide, 127 US National Guard, 16 United Kingdom (UK) Gulf War studies, 151 US National Health Interview Study (NHIS), United Kingdom (UK) Ministry of Supply, 138 157 United Kingdom (UK) processors, 136–137 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 19, 98

INDEX 271 US Postal Service, 122 Volume 1. See Gulf War and Health, Volume US Public Health Service, 119 1: Depleted Uranium, Pyridostigmine US Surgeon General, 119 Bromide, Sarin, Vaccines Uterine cancer, 138 W V WHO. See World Health Organization VA. See US Department of Veterans Affairs Whole-body radiation counting, 97 Vaccines, given to US troops, health effects Wide Range Achievement Test 3 Reading of, 90 (WRAT-3), 145, 147, 209 Ventilation, in tanks, 16, 93 Work history, using to model cumulative Veteran populations exposure, 78 applicability of study results to, 76 World Health Organization (WHO), 90, 105, Veterans Programs Enhancement Act, 1, 7 145, 210 WRAT-3. See Wide Range Achievement Test 3 Reading

Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $59.00 Buy Ebook | $47.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The 1991 Persian Gulf War was considered a brief and successful military operation with few injuries and deaths. A large number of returning veterans, however, soon began reporting health problems that they believed to be associated with their service in the gulf. Under a Congressional mandate, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) is reviewing a wide array of biologic, chemical, and physical agents to determine if exposure to these agents may be responsible for the veterans' health problems. In a 2000 report, Gulf War and Health, Volume 1: Depleted Uranium, Sarin, Pyridostigmine Bromide, and Vaccines, the IOM concluded that there was not enough evidence to draw conclusions as to whether long-term health problems are associated with exposure to depleted uranium, a component of some military munitions and armor. In response to veterans' ongoing concerns and recent publications in the literature, IOM updated its 2000 report. In this most recent report, Gulf War and Health: Updated Literature Review of Depleted Uranium, the committee concluded that there is still not enough evidence to determine whether exposure to depleted uranium is associated with long-term health problems. The report was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!