National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: References
Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2008. Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction and Economic Benefits from Controlling Ozone Air Pollution. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12198.
×
Page 204
Suggested Citation:"Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2008. Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction and Economic Benefits from Controlling Ozone Air Pollution. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12198.
×
Page 205

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Abbreviations ACS: American Cancer Society APEX: Air Pollutants Exposure CAA: U.S. Clean Air Act CAIR: Clean Air Implementation Rule CASAC: Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (of EPA) CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (of DHHS) CHAD: Consolidated Human Activity Database CMS: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (of DHHS) CMAQ: Community Multiscale Air Quality DHHS: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services DOT: U.S. Department of Transportation EC: elemental carbon EPA: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ExternE: European Union program to estimate the mortality impacts of exposure to ozone and to value those impacts. FDA: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (of DHHS) FMCSA: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (of DOT) NAAQS: National Ambient Air Quality Standard NHTSA: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (of DOT) NO: nitric oxide NO2: nitrogen dioxide NOx: oxides of nitrogen (NO and NO2) O2: diatomic oxygen OH: hydroxyl radical OP: oxygenated organic product OMB: U.S. Office of Management and Budget PM: particulate matter PM2.5: particulate matter with aerodynamic equivalent diameter of no more than 2.5 µm (microns) PM10: particulate matter with aerodynamic equivalent diameter of no more than 10 µm RIA: regulatory impacts analysis 204

Abbreviations 205 QALY: quality-adjusted life-years ROS: reactive oxygen species SAB: Science Advisory Board (of EPA) SIP: state implementation plan SO2: sulfur dioxide SOA: secondary organic aerosol VOC: volatile organic compound VSL: value of a statistical life VSLY: value of a statistical life-year WTA: willingness to accept compensation WTP: willingness to pay

Next: Appendix A: Biographic Information on Committee on Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction Benefits from Decreasing Tropospheric Ozone Exposure »
Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction and Economic Benefits from Controlling Ozone Air Pollution Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $55.00 Buy Ebook | $43.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In light of recent evidence on the relationship of ozone to mortality and questions about its implications for benefit analysis, the Environmental Protection Agency asked the National Research Council to establish a committee of experts to evaluate independently the contributions of recent epidemiologic studies to understanding the size of the ozone-mortality effect in the context of benefit analysis. The committee was also asked to assess methods for estimating how much a reduction in short-term exposure to ozone would reduce premature deaths, to assess methods for estimating associated increases in life expectancy, and to assess methods for estimating the monetary value of the reduced risk of premature death and increased life expectancy in the context of health-benefits analysis.

Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction and Economic Benefits from Controlling Ozone Air Pollution details the committee's findings and posits several recommendations to address these issues.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!