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The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors (2009)

Chapter: Appendix D: Working Group Meeting Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Working Group Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2009. The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12642.
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Page 197
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Working Group Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2009. The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12642.
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Page 198
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Working Group Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2009. The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12642.
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Page 199
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Working Group Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2009. The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12642.
×
Page 200
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Working Group Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2009. The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12642.
×
Page 201
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Working Group Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2009. The U.S. Commitment to Global Health: Recommendations for the Public and Private Sectors. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12642.
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Page 202

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Appendix D Working Group Meeting Agendas COMMITTEE ON THE U.S. COMMITMENT TO GLOBAL HEALTH WORKING GROUP MEETING: HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH June 10, 2008 1:00-1:05 p.m. Welcome and Introductions by Dr. Ruth Levine 1:05-1:45 p.m. Migration Panel Dr. Patricia Pittman, Executive Vice President, AcademyHealth U.S.-Based International Recruitment of Health Professionals in Low- and Middle-Income Countries Dr. Gillian Barclay, Advisor, Human Resource Development for Health, PAHO/WHO Office of Caribbean Program Coordination Caribbean Health Workers Emigration Dr. Michael Clemens, Research Fellow, Center for Global Development Health Effects of African Health Professional Emigration Ms. Dovelyn Rannveig Agunias, Associate Policy Analyst, Migration Policy Institute Learning by doing: Circular Migration Among Health Care Professionals 1:45-2:45 p.m. Panel Discussion 2:45-3:00 p.m. Break 

 THE U.S. COMMITMENT TO GLOBAL HEALTH 3:00-3:40 p.m. Donor Assistance and Capacity Building Panel Dr. Kelechi Ohiri, World Bank The Impact of Fiscal Policy on the Health Workforce Ms. Lois Schaefer, Senior Technical Advisor, HCD and Training, USAID Emerging Best Practices from the USAID Capacity Project Dr. Seble Lemma Frehywot, Assistant Research Professor of Health Policy and Global Health, The George Washington University Using Skills Mix for Care and Treatment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan, Murdock Head Professor of Medicine and Health Policy, The George Washington University Healers Abroad: Opportunities for U.S. Institutions to Build Human Resource Capacity 3:40-4:50 p.m. Panel Discussion 4:50-5:00 p.m. Closing remarks by IOM Committee Members WORKING GROUP MEETING: GLOBAL HEALTH GOVERNANCE June 26, 2008 9:00-9:05 a.m. Welcome Dr. Peggy Hamburg, IOM Committee Member 9:05-9:25 a.m. Opening Remarks Mr. Larry Gostin, Associate Dean and Linda D. and Timothy J. O’Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University Law Center 9:25-11:10 a.m. PANEL 1: State-centered approaches to global health governance Dr. Julian Schweitzer, Director, Health, Nutrition, and Population, the World Bank Dr. David Bell, Senior Medical Officer, Office of Strategy and Innovation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dr. Ian Smith, Advisor to the Director-General, WHO Dr. David De Ferranti, President and Director of Health Financing Task Force, Results for Development 11:10 a.m.-1:20 p.m. PANEL 2: Civil society approaches to global health governance

 APPENDIX D Dr. Seth Berkley, President and CEO, IAVI (teleconference) Dr. Rhona MacDonald, Global Health Watch (teleconference) Dr. Clarion Johnson, Global Medical Director, Exxon Mobile Mr. Josh Lozman, Vote ‘08 Policy Manager, One Campaign 1:20-3:00 p.m. PANEL 3: Optimal architecture and institutions Dr. Jennifer Prah Ruger, Co-Director of the Yale/World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Centre for Health Promotion, Policy and Research Dr. Mark Rosenberg, Executive Director, Task Force for Child Survival and Development Dr. Maria Ivanova, Assistant Professor of Government and Environmental Policy, The College of William and Mary; Director, Global Environmental Governance Project, Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy Mr. David Fidler, James L. Calamaras Professor of Law, Indiana University 3:00-4:00 p.m. PANEL 4: Topic discussion 4:00 p.m. Adjourn Dr. Peggy Hamburg WORKING GROUP MEETING: GAPS AND PRIORITIES IN U.S. CONTRIBUTIONS TO GLOBAL DISEASE CHALLENGES July 7, 2008 9:00-9:05 a.m. Welcome Jeff Koplan 9:05-10:35 a.m. Infectious Disease Panel Moderator: Sir George Alleyne, Director Emeritus PAHO HIV/TB: Dr. Stefano Bertozzi, Mexican National Institute of Public Health Malaria: Dr. Joel Breman, NIH Fogarty International Center Neglected Diseases: Dr. Peter Hotez, Sabin Vaccine Institute; George Washington University Biosecurity and Pandemic Threats: Dr. Tara O’Toole, Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Surveillance: Dr. Peter Nsubuga, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 10:35-10:45 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Adult Health and Risk Factors Panel

00 THE U.S. COMMITMENT TO GLOBAL HEALTH Moderator: Dr. Dean Jamison, UCSF School of Medicine Noncommunicable Disease Interventions: Dr. John Dirks, University of Toronto Noncommunicable Disease Prevention: Dr. Rachel Nugent, Center for Global Development Tobacco: Dr. Tom Frieden, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Mental Illness: Dr. Joanna Maselko, Temple University Essential Surgery: Dr. Colin McCord, Columbia University Injuries: Dr. Adnan Hyder, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Climate Change and Health: Dr. Kirk R. Smith, University of California, Berkeley 12:45-1:15 p.m. Lunch 1:15-2:45 p.m. Child and Women’s Health Panel Moderator: Dr. Dean Jamison, UCSF School of Medicine Maternal, Neonatal, and Reproductive Health: Dr. Khama Rogo, World Bank Diarrheal Disease and Acute Respiratory Infections: Dr. Jerry Keusch, Boston University School of Public Health Vaccine Preventable Diseases: Dr. Mathu Santosham, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Malnutrition: Dr. Robert Black, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Public Health Programming: Dr. Donald Bundy, World Bank 2:45-2:55 p.m. Break 2:55-3:55 p.m. Cross-Panel Discussion Moderator: Sir George Alleyne, Director Emeritus PAHO 3:55-4:00 p.m. Adjourn Prahbat Jha WORKING GROUP MEETING: CAPACITY BUILDING, KNOWLEDGE SHARING, AND INNOVATION IN GLOBAL HEALTH April 3, 2009 9:00-9:10 a.m. Introduction Maria Freire, Committee Member and Working Group Chair 9:10-9:20 a.m. Overview

0 APPENDIX D Anthony So, Duke University 9:20-11:15 a.m. PANEL 1: Advancing research capacity building Moderator: Dr. F. Gray Handley, NIAID, National Institutes of Health Dr. Patricia Garcia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; National Institutes of Health, Peru Dr. Warner C. Greene, Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology; University of California, San Francisco; Accordia Global Health Foundation Dr. Monique Wasunna, Centre for Clinical Research, Kenya Medical Research Institute Ms. Mary Lou Valdez, FDA 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Lunch 12:15-2:00 p.m. PANEL 2: Sharing information, knowledge, and materials Moderator: Dr. Anthony So, Duke University Dr. Ashley Stevens, Boston University Dr. Paul Herrling, Novartis Dr. David J. Lipman, NCBI, NLM, NIH Dr. Simon Kennedy, Boston Consulting Group Mr. Clark Freifeld, HealthMap.org Panel discussion: Questions from committee and from the public 2:00-2:10 p.m. Break 2:10-3:55 p.m. PANEL 3: Exploring novel collaborative research models and partnerships Moderator: Dr. Margaret Anderson, Faster Cures Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Dr. Chris Elias, PATH Dr. Elaine K. Gallin, Doris Duke Foundation Dr. Rachel Glennerster, MIT Panel discussion: Questions from committee and from the public 3:55-4:00 p.m. Concluding remarks Maria Freire, Committee Member and Working Group Chair

Next: Appendix E: Commissioned Paper: Global Health Governance Report--Lawrence O. Gostin and Emily A. Mok »
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Health is a highly valued, visible, and concrete investment that has the power to both save lives and enhance the credibility of the United States in the eyes of the world. While the United States has made a major commitment to global health, there remains a wide gap between existing knowledge and tools that could improve health if applied universally, and the utilization of these known tools across the globe.

The U.S. Commitment to Global Health concludes that the U.S. government and U.S.-based foundations, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and commercial entities have an opportunity to improve global health. The book includes recommendations that these U.S. institutions

  • increase the utilization of existing interventions to achieve significant health gains;
  • generate and share knowledge to address prevalent health problems in disadvantaged countries;
  • invest in people, institutions, and capacity building with global partners;
  • increase the quantity and quality of U.S. financial commitments to global health;
  • and engage in respectful partnerships to improve global health.

In doing so, the U.S. can play a major role in saving lives and improving the quality of life for millions around the world.

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