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Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity (2009)

Chapter: Appendix G: Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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G
Biographical Sketches

Eduardo J. Sanchez, M.D., M.P.H., FAAFP (Chair), is Vice President and Chief Medical Officer for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas. Previously, he was Director of the Institute for Health Policy at the Austin Regional Campus of the School of Public Health in the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. He was also previous Commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services. Dr. Sanchez received his M.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas and holds an M.P.H. from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health and an M.S. in biomedical engineering from Duke University. He holds a B.S. in biomedical engineering and a B.A. in chemistry from Boston University. As Commissioner and Chief Health Officer for the State of Texas, Dr. Sanchez oversaw mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment programs, disease prevention and bioterrorism preparedness programs, family and community health services programs, and environmental and consumer safety and health-related regulatory programs. Dr. Sanchez is a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. He practiced clinical medicine in Austin from 1992 to 2001. He also served as Health Authority and Chief Medical Officer for the Austin–Travis County Health and Human Services Department from 1994 to 1998. Dr. Sanchez served on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity and is a current member of the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention and the IOM Committee on a Comprehensive Review of the DHHS Office of Family Planning Title X Program.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

Peggy Beltrone, B.A., is a Cascade County (MT) Commissioner. She is also Chair and Founder of Get Fit Great Falls, an organization that encourages physical activity by organizing free and low-cost outdoor events and providing transportation and equipment for people to get to and use trails. Ms. Beltrone started Get Fit Great Falls in 2004 after attending a U.S. Forest Service recreation summit showcasing a federal effort to use public lands to encourage physical activity. With the forest supervisor at Lewis and Clark National Forest, she began outreach to community members and local health and recreation departments. Those departments and other partners, such as the local hospital, the Girl Scouts, 4-H, and the Great Falls Public School system, have made Get Fit Great Falls a truly collaborative effort. The program has had such success that the U.S. Forest Service held it up as a model in recent congressional testimony. In addition to her work with the program, Ms. Beltrone chaired the National Association of Counties (NACo) Rural Obesity Initiative. A paper addressing the differences involved in approaching childhood obesity in a rural versus an urban setting can be found on the NACo website. Ms. Beltrone is co-chair of NACo’s Mobilizing County Officials to Prevent Youth Obesity, an initiative funded by Leadership for Healthy Communities.


Laura K. Brennan, Ph.D., M.P.H., is President and CEO of Transtria, a public health research and consulting company in St. Louis, MO. She is also an assistant professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education in the Department of Community Health at Saint Louis University School of Public Health. Dr. Brennan received her Ph.D. from Saint Louis University. For more than 10 years, she has participated in designing and evaluating community-based initiatives, conducting community-based participatory approaches to intervention and research, developing and communicating health messages, creating and assessing evidence-based intervention strategies, and performing needs assessment through surveys, interviews, and focus groups. She has participated in multiple projects at the national, state, and local levels to facilitate discussions among practitioners (health, transportation, urban planning, parks and recreation, community organizing), researchers, providers, community members and advocacy groups to assist them in planning efforts to address social, economic and environmental influences on health. Dr. Brennan has published 19 peer-reviewed articles studying behaviors and health, she is lead author of Promoting Healthy Equity: A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health, and she is a co-author of Tailoring Health Messages: Customizing Communication with Computer

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

Technology. She is active with the Alliance for the Status of Missouri Women, Citizens for Modern Transit, and the Missouri Family Health Council.


Joseph A. Curtatone, J.D., is serving his third term as mayor of Somerville, Massachusetts. Mr. Curtatone earned his B.A. from Boston College in 1990, and a J.D. from New England School of Law in 1994. Prior to his election as mayor, he had served as an attorney in private practice. As Mayor, he has successfully implemented a wide range of reforms and new programs that have earned Somerville many distinctions from regional and national organizations, including designation by Boston Globe Magazine as “the best-run city in Massachusetts” and by America’s Promise Alliance as one of the “100 Best Communities for Youth”; the city was also named an All America City in June 2009 by the National Civic League. Under his leadership, Somerville has also earned national recognition for its successful joint effort with Tufts University to implement “Shape Up Somerville,” an effective program to reduce the incidence of childhood obesity among the city’s elementary school children. The campaign targeted all segments of the community, including schools, city government, civic organizations, community groups, businesses, and other people who live, work, and play in Somerville. His success in Somerville has earned him the presidency of the Massachusetts Mayor’s Association, a position on the Board of Directors for the National League of Cities, and as a member of the Metropolitan Mayors Association.


Eric A. Finkelstein, Ph.D., M.H.A., is a health economist for the research organization RTI International in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Dr. Finkelstein obtained an M.H.A., and an M.A. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Washington and a B.A. in mathematics/economics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His work focuses on the economic causes and consequences of health-related behaviors, with a primary emphasis on obesity. Dr. Finkelstein has published more than 40 peer-reviewed articles on the economics of obesity and related behaviors. His research has been featured on the front page of USA Today and has been covered in the Economist, the New York Times, Forbes, the Washington Post, and many other newspaper, radio, and television outlets. Dr. Finkelstein also co-wrote the book The Fattening of America—How the Economy Makes Us Fat, If It Matters, and What to Do About It. He leads several projects concerning the causes and consequences of obesity and evaluates several obesity prevention programs for the Centers for Disease

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

Control and Prevention and other agencies. Prior to joining RTI, he was an Agency for Health Care Policy and Research fellow and research scientist with the University of Washington’s Department of Family Medicine. He has also taught health economics at Duke University.


Tracy Fox, M.P.H., R.D., is a nutrition and policy consultant and President of Food, Nutrition, and Policy Consultants, LLC. Ms. Fox received her M.P.H. from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and a B.S. in dietetics from Hood College. Ms. Fox has held positions as Senior Federal Regulatory Manager with the American Dietetic Association, Washington, DC; Food Program Specialist in the Child Nutrition Division and Assistant to the Associate Administrator with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service, Alexandria, Virginia; Manager of Federal Systems Division with Maximus, Inc., Falls Church, Virginia; Instructor of Food Preparation and Meal Management at Hood College, Frederick, Maryland; and dietitian in food management and clinical dietetics with the U.S. Navy. She is Vice President of the Society for Nutrition Education and serves on the Action for Healthy Kids Partner Steering Committee, is on the board of the Maryland Healthy Schools Coalition, Co-Chaired the Montgomery County School Health Council, and Chaired the Health Committee of the Montgomery County Council of Parent-Teacher Associations. Ms. Fox was a member of the IOM Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in School.


Susan L. Handy, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at the University of California at Davis. She is also the director of the Sustainable Transportation Center, part of the federal university transportation centers program. Dr. Handy received a B.S.E. in civil engineering from Princeton University, an M.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University, and her Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of California at Berkeley. Her research focuses on the relationships between transportation and land use, particularly the impact of land use on travel behavior, and on strategies for reducing automobile dependence. Her recent work includes a series of studies on bicycling in Davis, examinations of changing policies and practices in regional transportation planning, an exploration of the travel needs of recent immigrants in California, and a study of the effect of cul-de-sacs on children’s outdoor play. She currently serves on the National Academies’ Committee on Innovations in Travel Demand Modeling and she was a member of the Committee

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

of Telecommunications and Travel Behavior; Committee on Research on Women’s Issues in Transportation; Committee for the Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth; and the Committee on Carbon Monoxide Episodes in Meteorological and Topographical Problem Areas.


James Krieger, M.D., M.P.H., is Chief of the Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Section at Public Health–Seattle and King County, Clinical Professor of Medicine and Health Services, and Attending Physician at the University of Washington. He received his undergraduate degree at Harvard University, completed medical training at the University of California, San Francisco, and received an M.P.H. from the University of Washington. His recent research work has emphasized interventions to reduce health disparities by addressing social determinants of health. One area of focus is working with public housing and lower-income communities to design and evaluate healthy community interventions that promote physical activity, increase access to healthy foods, and build community. Dr. Krieger has also directed two community chronic disease coalitions which seek to reduce disparities in asthma, diabetes and overweight: Seattle-King County Allies Against Asthma and King County Steps to Health. He is senior leader for the newly funded Kellogg Food and Fitness Initiative that links food systems work with healthy built environments. He directed Seattle Partners for Healthy Communities, a collaboration between community, public health, and the university to conduct community-based participatory research about interventions that address social determinants of health. Dr. Krieger is a nationally recognized expert in housing and health and the development and evaluation of community-based chronic disease control and prevention programs.


Donald Diego Rose, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and Director of the Prevention Research Center at Tulane University. Dr. Rose holds degrees from the University of California at Berkeley in nutritional sciences (B.S.), public health nutrition (M.P.H.), and agricultural economics (Ph.D.). He began his career as a project director/nutritionist for the WIC Nutrition Program in a farm worker clinic in rural California. Dr. Rose worked for USDA’s Economic Research Service as a research team leader on the determinants and consequences of household food insecurity in America, the nutrition and health impacts of food assistance programs, and the evaluation of low-income nutrition education projects. He also worked internationally on food consumption and food security

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

projects in Mozambique and South Africa. Dr. Rose’s research at Tulane focuses on the social and economic side of nutrition problems, including disparities in access to food, the links between food access and consumption, domestic and international food security, and the importance of the time dimension for U.S. nutrition policy. Currently, he has research projects funded by USDA and NCI on neighborhood access to healthy foods and its influence on consumption in New Orleans and southeast Louisiana. Dr. Rose served on the National Research Council panel to review USDA’s food security measurement.


Mary T. Story, Ph.D., R.D., is Professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health in the School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. She is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Story has her Ph.D. in nutrition and her interests are in the area of child and adolescent nutrition, obesity prevention, and environmental and policy approaches to improve healthy eating. Her research focuses on understanding the multiple factors related to eating behaviors of youth, and environmental, community and school-based interventions for obesity prevention and healthy eating. She has over 300 journal articles and publications in the area of child and adolescent nutrition and obesity. She is the Director of the National Program Office for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Eating Research program. She is currently on the editorial boards for the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, Journal of Adolescent Health, and Nutrition Today. She has received several awards for her work. She was a member of the IOM Committee on Food Marketing to Children and Youth and the Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools. She is a current member of the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention.


Adewale Troutman, M.D., M.P.H., M.A., is the Director of the Louisville Metro Health Department and an Associate Professor at the University of Louisville School of Public Health. He received an M.P.H. from the Columbia University School of Public Health and also earned an M.A. in Black Studies from the State University of New York. He completed medical training at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and served his residency and internship in Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina. As Director of the Louisville Metro Health Department, Dr. Troutman created the Center for Health Equity, which focuses on eliminating health inequities based on race, ethnicity or socioeconomic status. He also established the Mayor’s Healthy Hometown

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

Movement, a community wide effort to motivate the citizens of Louisville to engage in more physical activity and to adopt healthier lifestyles and the Take Charge Challenge, a worksite wellness program for Louisville Metro employees. Dr. Troutman has served as the Director of the Fulton County (Atlanta, Georgia) Department of Health and Wellness and as a senior scientist for Community Health and Preventive Medicine at the Morehouse School of Medicine. At Morehouse, he worked with former U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher on a study of racial disparities in health. Dr. Troutman’s many leadership positions have included the Chair of the Health and Social Justice Advisory Committee of the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), the governing board of American Public Health Association, the Presidency of the Black Caucus of Health Workers, and the Health Equity Social Justice Strategic Directors Team.


Antronette K. (Toni) Yancey, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor of Health Services and Co-Director, UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Equity at UCLA School of Public Health. She completed her B.A. in biochemistry and molecular biology at Northwestern University, her M.D. at Duke, and her preventive medicine residency and M.P.H. at UCLA. Dr. Yancey has generated over $25 million in extramural funds including four National Institutes of Health independent investigator awards as principal investigator, and authored more than 100 scientific publications, including policy briefs, reports, book chapters, radio commentaries, videos, and, among them, 75 peer-reviewed journal articles and editorials on chronic disease prevention and adolescent health, with an emphasis on urban communities of color. She spent 5 years in public health practice, as Director of Public Health for the city of Richmond, Virginia, and Director of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Dr. Yancey serves on the Coordinating Committee of the National Physical Activity Plan, the IOM Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention and Health Literacy Roundtable, and the editorial boards for the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and American Journal of Health Promotion. She chairs the Board of Directors of the Oakland, California-based Public Health Institute, and formerly served on the Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee; Board of the National Marrow Donor Program, and IOM Committee on Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity. Her book, Instant Recess: How to Build a Fit Nation for the 21st Century (University of California Press), is anticipated in 2010.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

Paul Zykofsky, B.Sc., BArch, M.U.P., is Director of the Land Use and Transportation Programs at the Local Government Commission (LGC) in Sacramento, California, and manages its Center for Livable Communities. He obtained the degrees of bachelor of architecture and master of urban planning from the City College of New York. Mr. Zykofsky has experience in land use, air quality, and transportation planning gained while working at a city development agency, an air quality management district and a council of governments. He is co-author of documents on transit-oriented development and street design and has edited numerous documents on sustainable development and community design. In collaboration with the California Department of Health Services, Mr. Zykofsky has directed a first-of-its-kind project to promote physical activity by improving the design of the pedestrian environment. He currently directs the LGC’s Leadership for Healthy Communities project, part of a national initiative supported by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Mr. Zykofsky serves on the Steering Committee of the Rail-Volution conference, an annual national conference on building livable communities with transit. He also was one of four instructors that developed and administered 3-day classes on Context Sensitive Solutions to several hundred planners and engineers in the California Department of Transportation’s district offices. He facilitates workshops throughout the United States on Safe Routes to School and teaches a 2-day course for the Federal Highway Administration on designing for pedestrian safety. He also facilitates multiday design charrettes aimed at helping communities develop plans to create more walkable, bicycle-friendly places. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners, an Associate Member of the American Institute of Architects and a member of the Congress for the New Urbanism. Mr. Zykofsky was born and raised in Mexico and is fluent in Spanish.

Study Staff

Lynn Parker, M.S., is a Scholar and Study Director for the Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention, the Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention Actions for Local Governments and the Committee on an Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making. Ms. Parker received a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in human nutrition from Cornell University. Before she joined IOM, she was a nutritionist at the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), a national organization working to end hunger and undernutrition in the United States, most recently as director of Child Nutrition Programs and Nutrition Policy, where she directed FRAC’s work on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

child nutrition programs, research, and nutrition policy. She also led FRAC’s initiative on understanding and responding to the paradox of hunger, poverty, and obesity. She served on the Technical Advisory Group to America’s Second Harvest 2001 and 2005 National Hunger Surveys; the National Nutrition Monitoring Advisory Council (appointed by then Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell); and as President of the Society for Nutrition Education. She also served two terms as a member of the Food and Nutrition Board and was a member of its Committee on Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools. Before joining FRAC, she worked with New York State’s Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program at Cornell University.


Annina Catherine Burns, M.Sc., is a Study Director for Community Perspectives on Childhood Obesity Prevention and Perspectives from United Kingdom and the United States Policymakers on Obesity Prevention. She is also Co-Study Director for Childhood Obesity Prevention: Austin, Texas. Ms. Burns previously worked for the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva, Switzerland, on the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. At the WHO, she was a project manager and led the development of the report Interventions on Diet and Physical Activity: What Works. Ms. Burns was a Marshall Scholar at Oxford University, United Kingdom, where she pursued her Masters of Science in Economic and Social History and her thesis research was on The Emergence of Obesity in Scotland: Historical and Contemporary Dietary Intakes. She is currently completing a Ph.D. from Oxford University, with a focus on nutrition policy, obesity and economics. Ms. Burns holds a B.S. in nutritional sciences and a B.A. in media studies from Penn State University. She is the recipient of the Reddy Mission Award given to Penn State’s most outstanding scholar who has integrated academic excellence, internationalization, service, and leadership.


Catharyn T. Liverman, M.L.S., is a Scholar at the IOM. In her 16 years with the IOM, she has worked on studies addressing a range of topics, focused primarily on public health and science policy. She was recently Study Director for two IOM reports on preventing childhood obesity. Other recent studies in which she was involved include Organ Donation: Opportunities for Action; Spinal Cord Injury: Progress, Promise, and Priorities; Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions; Gulf War and Health; and Reducing the Burden of Injury. Her background is in medical library science; she previously held positions at the National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

Agricultural Library and the Naval War College Library. She received her B.A. from Wake Forest University and her M.L.S. from the University of Maryland.


Nicole Ferring, M.S., R.D., is a Research Associate with the Food and Nutrition Board. She works with the Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention and the Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention Actions for Local Governments. Ms. Ferring previously worked for the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) on the Nutrition Action Healthletter. She recently finished a year-long dietetic internship through Virginia Tech to obtain the registered dietitian credential. The internship allowed her to rotate through different types of nutrition settings in the Washington, DC, area, including hospitals, community nonprofits, policy organizations, and even a farm. She holds a B.S. in magazine journalism with a minor in nutrition from Syracuse University and an M.S. in nutrition communication from Tufts University.


Matthew B. Spear, B.A., is a Senior Program Assistant with the Food and Nutrition Board. He works with the Standing Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention, the Committee on Childhood Obesity Prevention Actions for Local Governments, and the Committee on an Evidence Framework for Obesity Prevention Decision Making. Mr. Spear holds a B.A. in economics from Boston College. He recently completed a year-long course and internship studying culinary arts in Florence, Italy, and working as a private chef. International travel and interest in languages drew him out of the kitchen and formed his interest in public policy, leading him to the IOM.


Linda D. Meyers, Ph.D., is the Food and Nutrition Board Director. Prior to assuming that position in 2003, she was Deputy Director and senior Program Officer for two years. She also directed the Food and Nutrition Board’s international nutrition program from 1982 to 1986. From 1986 to 2001, she served in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in the Department of Health and Human Services, where she was a Senior Nutrition Advisor, Deputy Director, and Acting Director. While there, she oversaw the preparation of numerous technical and policy reports, including the 1990, 1995, and 2000 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the U.S. Action Plan on Food Security, and the national health objectives for Healthy People 2010. Dr. Meyers received a B.A. in health and physical education from Goshen College in Indiana. After 4 years in Botswana, she pursued graduate studies in nutrition at Colorado State

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

University (M.S. 1974) and Cornell University (Ph.D. 1978). Her research at Cornell focused on population indicators of nutritional status. Her work on the prevalence and correlates of iron deficiency anemia was among the first to identify differences in normal hemoglobin distributions between black and white women and question the use of a single hemoglobin cutpoint for prevalence estimates. Dr. Meyers has also worked in Kenya and lived in Viet Nam. She has received a number of awards for her contributions to public health, including the Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award for Healthy People 2010 and the Surgeon General’s Medallion.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix G: Biographical Sketches." Transportation Research Board, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council. 2009. Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12674.
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The prevalence of childhood obesity is so high in the United States that it may reduce the life expectancy of today's generation of children. While parents and other adult caregivers play a fundamental role in teaching children about healthy behaviors, even the most positive efforts can be undermined by local environments that are poorly suited to supporting healthy behaviors. For example, many communities lack ready sources of healthy food choices, such as supermarkets and grocery stores. Or they may not provide safe places for children to walk or play. In such communities, even the most motivated child or adolescent may find it difficult to act in healthy ways. Local governments--with jurisdiction over many aspects of land use, food marketing, community planning, transportation, health and nutrition programs, and other community issues--are ideally positioned to promote behaviors that will help children and adolescents reach and maintain healthy weights.

Local Government Actions to Prevent Childhood Obesity presents a number of recommendations that touch on the vital role of government actions on all levels--federal, state, and local--in childhood obesity prevention. The book offers healthy eating and physical activity strategies for local governments to consider, making it an excellent resource for mayors, managers, commissioners, council members, county board members, and administrators.

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