National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Introduction--Clark McFadden
Suggested Citation:"Opening Remarks--John Lushetsky." National Research Council. 2011. The Future of Photovoltaics Manufacturing in the United States: Summary of Two Symposia. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12724.
×

Opening Remarks

John Lushetsky
U.S. Department of Energy

Mr. Lushetsky began by referring to discussions about renewable energy at DoE over the past six to nine months—topics that at first seemed somewhat unfocused: How to reduce costs, industry standards, workforce needs, corporate partners, finance models. “At a certain point, he said, “we realized that we were really trying to look at the future of photovoltaic manufacturing in the United States. How do you bring together all these issues to provide some comprehensive response that is helpful to this industry?”

He said that the strategy for solar programs at DoE is not to replace anything the private sector would do, but to find a role for government that helps to accelerate what industry can do on its own. Mr. Lushetsky said that the purpose of the symposium was to understand in finer detail what industry needs, and to help guide a government response that is sufficiently “prompt, effective, and strategic.” He noted that some of the models that might be helpful in this effort, such as SEMATECH, had already been studied extensively by the National Academies. This is one factor that had convinced him that much could be gained by collaborating with the Academies on the design and execution of this symposium.

Suggested Citation:"Opening Remarks--John Lushetsky." National Research Council. 2011. The Future of Photovoltaics Manufacturing in the United States: Summary of Two Symposia. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12724.
×
Page 43
Next: Panel I: Opportunities and Challenges Facing PV Manufacturing in the United States »
The Future of Photovoltaics Manufacturing in the United States: Summary of Two Symposia Get This Book
×
Buy Hardback | $61.00 Buy Ebook | $48.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Technological innovation and growth are critical to U.S. competitiveness in a global economy. One means of facilitating growth and improving competitiveness is to foster more robust innovation ecosystems through the development of public-private partnerships, industry consortia, and other regional and national economic development initiatives. Public-private partnerships, in particular, catalyze the commercialization of state and national investments in research and development.

One of the major projects of the National Research Council's Board on Science Technology and Economic Policy (STEP) is to examine state and local investment programs designed to attract and grow knowledge-based industries. STEP analyzes state and regional innovation initiatives to gain a better understanding of the challenges associated with the transition of research into products, the practices associated with successful state and regional programs, and their interaction with federal programs and private initiatives. In April and July 2009, STEP convened two meeting to assess the future of the U.S. photovoltaic industry and the practical steps that the federal government and some state and regional governments are taking to develop the capacity to manufacture photovoltaics competitively.

The Future of Photovoltaic Manufacturing in the United States captures the presentations and discussions of these meetings. This report explores the prospects for cooperative R&D efforts, standards, and roadmapping efforts that could accelerate innovation and growth of a U.S. photovoltaics industry. It includes both efforts to strengthen existing industries as well as specific new technology focus areas such as nanotechnology, stem cells, and energy in order to gain an improved understanding of program goals, challenges, and accomplishments.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!