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A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) (2010)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
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Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Nancy T. Tippins (Chair) is managing principal and senior vice president of the Valtera Corporation. She manages the firm’s development and execution of strategies related to job analysis, competency development, employee selection, assessment, and leadership development. She oversees the teams that develop legally and professionally compliant tools, administrative processes, and delivery platforms to meet client staffing, assessment, and succession planning requirements. She has a long-standing involvement with the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), serving as president in 2000-2001. She is a fellow of SIOP and the American Psychological Association and is involved in several private industry research groups. She has authored or coauthored numerous journal articles on assessment, is associate editor for the Scientist-Practitioner Forum of Personnel Psychology, and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Applied Psychology. She has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in industrial and organizational psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology and an M.Ed. in counseling and psychological services from Georgia State University.


David Autor is professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research specializes in human capital and earnings inequality; labor market impacts of technological change; contingent and intermediated work arrangements; health, disability, and labor supply; and employment protection and labor market operation. His recent work has used the O*NET system as a source of information on skill demands. He is a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and will soon be editor in chief of the Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
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He has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.


John P. Campbell is professor of psychology and professor of human resources and industrial relations at the University of Minnesota. For over 30 years he has been involved in research on occupational analysis, individual performance assessment, and personnel selection and classification. He served as associate editor and then editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology from 1973 to 1982. He has served as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and received its career award for distinguished scientific contributions to industrial and organizational psychology in 1992. He also has over 20 years of experience as the principal scientist on a series of projects dealing with the selection and classification of U.S. Army enlisted personnel, the most extensive of which was Project A, which is the topic of his most recent book, Exploring the Limits in Personnel Selection and Classification (coauthored with Deirdre Knapp). In 2006 he received the American Psychological Association Award for distinguished scientific contributions to the application of psychology. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota.


Keith Ewald is director of the Bureau of Labor Market Information in the Office of Workforce Development at the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. He has over 25 years of experience in public information management and dissemination. Among his major responsibilities is managing the workforce information programs of the state of Ohio for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and Employment and Training Administration. As part of this process, the Bureau of Labor Market Information is a primary provider of public information regarding industry, occupational, and general workforce statistics. Access to this information has greatly expanded via Internet services. Previously he managed the Office of Research in the Ohio Department of Development. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the Ohio State University.


Richard Froeschle is deputy director of labor market and career information for the Texas Workforce Commission. He has responsibility for grant programs of the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Labor in the areas of labor market and career information, economic development, statistical development, dissemination and training. He had primary responsibility for implementing the O*NET database into the Texas skills transferability system. He has an M.S. in labor and industrial relations from the University of North Texas.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×

Margaret L. Hilton (Study Director) is senior program officer of the Center for Education in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. She recently directed a workshop on science education and 21st century skills, building on the 2008 report, Research on Future Skill Demands: A Workshop Summary. She has directed and contributed to studies of high school science laboratories, the role of state standards in K-12 education, foreign language and international studies in higher education, international labor standards, and the information technology workforce. Prior to joining the National Research Council, Hilton was a consultant to the National Skill Standards Board. Earlier, at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, she directed studies of workforce training, work reorganization, and international competitiveness. She has a B.A. in geography (with high honors) from the University of Michigan, a master of regional planning degree from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and a master of human resource development degree from George Washington University.


Les Janis is director of the Georgia Career Information Center at Georgia State University, serving since its inception in 1977. The center, through its Georgia Career Information System, provides occupational and educational information to the schools and agencies throughout the state. In cooperation with the Georgia Department of Education, the center helps conduct the state’s Career Resource Network activities. Janis chairs the National Occupational Supply Demand Consortium. He has an M.A. in counseling from Miami University.


Virginia Lesser is director of the Survey Research Center at Oregon State University, where she also serves as associate professor in the Statistics Department. Her research interests are in sampling, survey methodology, environmental statistics, and applied statistics. She has written on nonsampling error, the effects of item and unit nonresponse on nonresponse error, and multiphase sampling. She has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina and an undergraduate degree in biology.


Kerry Levin, an experimental social psychologist, is associate director at Westat, Inc., with more than 20 years of project management experience. She is currently managing several blanket purchase agreements for various federal agencies. She is experienced in managing these types of contracts and ensuring the necessary resources are secured for all tasks. She has conducted large web surveys related to customer service and evaluation for agencies that include the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Internal Revenue Service, and the U.S. Patent and Trademark

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×

Office. She specializes in survey design, administration, and analysis. She has also been involved in several methodological feasibility studies for the Bureau of Labor Statistics and NIST to identify the most cost-effective procedures for collecting data from individuals in business establishments. She has a Ph.D. in experimental/social psychology from Vanderbilt University.


Kenneth Pearlman, currently in an independent consulting practice in Sarasota, Florida, is an industrial-organizational psychologist who has specialized in research and applications in the areas of personnel selection and assessment, work and skill analysis, person-job matching, and productivity measurement and enhancement. He has been involved in a number of federal and military work analysis and assessment-related initiatives, including revision of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Dictionary of Occupational Titles (what is now O*NET), and consultation to the National Skills Standards Board. He also serves on review and advisory panels for U.S. Army Research Institute personnel and classification research projects. He is on the editorial boards of Personnel Psychology and the International Journal of Selection and Assessment and served for 8 years on the editorial board of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology’s (SIOP’s) professional practice book series. He is coholder of a U.S. patent on an innovative job analysis software tool. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Board on Testing and Assessment. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and SIOP.


Thomas J. Plewes (Associate Study Director) is senior program officer of the Committee on National Statistics in the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He has directed studies of the Agricultural Resources Management Survey, the state and local government statistics program of the Census Bureau, the use of the American Community Survey for the National Science Foundation science and engineering workforce statistics, and international trade traffic statistics. He has supported initiatives with the U.S. General Accounting Office on key national indicators of performance. Prior to joining the National Research Council staff, he was associate commissioner for employment and unemployment statistics of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, where he had responsibility for the nation’s labor force and occupational data. In that position, he directed major revisions of the standard industrial and occupational classification systems. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and was a member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology. He has a B.A. from Hope College and an M.A. from George Washington University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×

Ann Marie Ryan is professor of organizational psychology at Michigan State University. She was employed for several years at Bowling Green State University, where she directed the Institute for Psychological Research and Application. She has published widely on the topics of fairness in organizational decision-making processes, contextual and nonability factors in employee selection, applicant perceptions of fairness, recruitment and job search, diversity in organizations, and employee assessment tools. She is a fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (and recently completed a term as president), the American Psychological Association, and the American Psychological Society. Currently she serves as editor for Personnel Psychology. She has also long maintained consulting relationships with both public- and private-sector organizations. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago.


Juan I. Sanchez is professor of management and international business and Knight-Ridder Byron Harless Chair in Management at Florida International University. He has published approximately 60 articles in refereed journals. He has served in the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, International Journal of Selection and Assessment, Group and Organization Management, and currently serves as associate editor for the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, he has consulted with government agencies and private organizations in the United States, Europe, and Latin America. He has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of South Florida, Tampa.


William Shobe is director of business and economics research of the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service at the University of Virginia. His research interests include economic analysis of regulations in Virginia and annual tax rates surveys for Virginia localities. He has developed a distributed data store design for Virginia government and serves as a member of the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund Advisory Committee of the Virginia Unemployment Commission. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2010. A Database for a Changing Economy: Review of the Occupational Information Network (O*NET). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12814.
×
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Information about the characteristics of jobs and the individuals who fill them is valuable for career guidance, reemployment counseling, workforce development, human resource management, and other purposes. To meet these needs, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) in 1998 launched the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), which consists of a content model--a framework for organizing occupational data--and an electronic database. The O*NET content model includes hundreds of descriptors of work and workers organized into domains, such as skills, knowledge, and work activities. Data are collected using a classification system that organizes job titles into 1,102 occupations.

The National Center for O*NET Development (the O*NET Center) continually collects data related to these occupations. In 2008, DOL requested the National Academies to review O*NET and consider its future directions. In response, the present volume inventories and evaluates the uses of O*NET; explores the linkage of O*NET with the Standard Occupational Classification System and other data sets; and identifies ways to improve O*NET, particularly in the areas of cost-effectiveness, efficiency, and currency.

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