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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2010. Technical Capabilities Necessary for Regulation of Systemic Financial Risk: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12841.
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Appendix B
Workshop Participants

Viral V. Acharya, New York University

Tobias Adrian, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Lewis Alexander, Department of the Treasury

Tanya Styblo Beder, SBCC Group, Inc.

Penny Cagan, Algorithmics

Mark Carey, Federal Reserve Board

Robert N. Collender, Federal Housing Finance Agency

Christine M. Cumming, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Deborah J. Danker, Department of the Treasury

Giovanni Dell’Ariccia, International Monetary Fund

Robert F. Engle, New York University

Randall Fasnacht, U.S. Senate Banking Committee

Gregory Feldberg, Department of the Treasury

Charles Fishkin, AllianceBernstein

Darryl E. Getter, Congressional Research Service

Michael S. Gibson, Federal Reserve Board

Daniel L. Goroff, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Alan J. King, IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center

Paul H. Kupiec, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Joseph Langsam, Morgan Stanley

C. David Levermore, University of Maryland

Mark Levonian, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

Nellie Liang, Federal Reserve Board

John C. Liechty, Pennsylvania State University

Andrew W. Lo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Charles M. Lucas, Osprey Point Consulting

Thomas J. McCool, Government Accountability Office

Allan I. Mendelowitz, Federal Housing Finance Board (retired)

David K.I. Mordecai, Risk Economics Limited, Inc.

Yaacov Mutnikas, Algorithmics

John W. O’Brien, University of California at Berkeley

Gerald Peters, GP Gallery

David M. Rowe, SunGard

Barry Schachter, Moore Capital Management

Myron S. Scholes, Stanford University

J.B. Silvers, Case Western Reserve University

Charles Smithson, Rutter Associates

George Sugihara, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Charles Taylor, The Pew Charitable Trusts

Charles M. Vest, National Academy of Engineering

Scott T. Weidman, National Research Council

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Workshop Participants." National Research Council. 2010. Technical Capabilities Necessary for Regulation of Systemic Financial Risk: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12841.
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The financial reform plans currently under discussion in the United States recognize the need for monitoring and regulating systemic risk in the financial sector. To inform those discussions, the National Research Council held a workshop on November 3, 2009, to identify the major technical challenges to building such a capability. The workshop, summarized in this volume, addressed the following key issues as they relate to systemic risk:

  • What data and analytical tools are currently available to regulators to address this challenge?
  • What further data-collection and data-analysis capabilities are needed?
  • What specific resource needs are required to accomplish the task?
  • What are the major technical challenges associated with systemic risk regulation?
  • What are various options for building these capabilities?

Because every systemic event is unique with respect to its specific pathology--the various triggers and the propagation of effects--the workshop focused on the issues listed above for systemic risk in general rather than for any specific scenario. Thus, by design, the workshop explicitly addressed neither the causes of the current crisis nor policy options for reducing risk, and it attempted to steer clear of some policy issues altogether (such as how to allocate new supervisory responsibilities). More than 40 experts representing diverse perspectives participated in the workshop.

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