National Academies Press: OpenBook

Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean (2010)

Chapter: Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies

« Previous: References
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×

A

Committee and
Staff Biographies

image

COMMITTEE

François M.M. Morel, Chair, is the Albert G. Blanke Professor of Geosciences and Director of the Center for Environmental BioInorganic Chemistry at Princeton University. He earned his Ph.D. in engineering sciences from the California Institute of Technology in 1971. Dr. Morel’s research is focused on trace metal biogeochemistry, particularly the role of trace metals in the growth and activity of marine phytoplankton. One of his current projects is on the effects of decreasing pH on key chemical and biological processes such as the precipitation of calcium carbonate and the availability of major and trace nutrients. He is a fellow of the Geochemistry Society and the American Geophysical Union and is on the editorial board of several journals. Dr. Morel has served on three previous NRC committees, and was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

David Archer is a professor in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. He earned his Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington in 1990. He has worked on a wide range of topics pertaining to the global carbon cycle and its relation to global climate, with special focus on ocean sedimentary processes such as CaCO3 dissolution and methane hydrate formation, and their impact on the evolution of atmospheric CO2. He previously served on the NRC Organizing Committee for the First Annual Symposium on Japanese-American Frontiers of Science.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×

James P. Barry is a senior scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. He earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1988. His research focuses on deep-sea biology and ecology, biological oceanography, the biology and ecology of chemosynthetic communities, climate change and marine ecosystems, polar ecology, and the biology of a high-CO2 ocean. He is currently a member of the National Oceanographic Partnership Program’s Science Advisory Panel on Investigations of Chemosynthetic Communities on the Lower Continental Slope of the Gulf of Mexico.

Garry D. Brewer is the Frederick K. Weyerhaeuser Professor of Resource Policy and Management at the Yale University School of Management. He earned his Ph.D. in political science from Yale University in 1970. Dr. Brewer is a policy scientist with broad expertise in natural resource and environmental management. Dr. Brewer has served on numerous NRC boards and committees, including chairing the Panel on Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities for Environmental Decision Making as well as the Panel on Strategies and Methods for Climate-Related Decision Support. He was also a member of the Board on Ocean Sciences and Policy from 1983-85 and then continued from 1985-87 as a member of the Ocean Studies Board.

Jorge E. Corredor is a professor of chemical oceanography at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez in their Department of Marine Sciences. Dr. Corredor earned a Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Miami and a M.S. in biochemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Madison supported by Fulbright-Hays and IOC-UNESCO fellowships. He is currently researching the biogeochemistry and genomics of carbon flux in the Caribbean as forced by large river plumes and meso-scale eddies. He is also working on the establishment of an ocean observing system in the Caribbean region. Dr. Corredor is currently a member of the Ocean Studies Board.

Scott C. Doney is senior scientist in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Dr. Doney earned a Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in 1991. His research focuses on marine biogeochemistry and ecosystem dynamics, climate change, ocean acidification, and the global carbon cycle. Dr. Doney is also the chair of the Scientific Steering Committee of the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program.

Victoria J. Fabry is a professor of biology in the Department of Biological

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×

Sciences at California State University, San Marcos. Dr. Fabry earned a Ph.D. in biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 1988. Her current research focuses on the sensitivity of calcareous organisms and marine ecosystems to elevated carbon dioxide and ocean acidification, and the dissolution kinetics of biogenic calcium carbonates in the upper ocean. In 2004, Dr. Fabry presented testimony to the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on the “Impacts of Anthropogenic CO2 on Coral Reefs and Other Marine Calcifiers.”

Gretchen E. Hofmann is a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Hofmann earned a Ph.D. in Environmental, Population, and Organismal Biology from the University of Colorado in 1992. Her research focuses on the effects of climate and climate change on the performance of marine species, specifically on the impact on marine organisms of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations via global warming and ocean acidification. She served on the NRC Committee on the National Ecological Observatory Network.

Daniel S. Holland is a Research Scientist at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute. He was awarded his Ph.D. in environmental and natural resource economics from the University of Rhode Island in 1998. Dr. Holland’s research is focused on the design and evaluation of fishery management tools and strategies that will lead to profitable and sustainable fisheries and a healthy marine ecosystem. His research methods include bioeconomic simulation modeling, econometric analysis, experimental economics, and qualitative policy analysis. He actively participates in the development of fishery policy by working with fishery stakeholders and managers to develop and evaluate policy. He is also the associate editor of Marine Resource Economics.

Joan A. Kleypas is a Scientist III at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Kleypas earned a Ph.D. in Tropical Marine Studies from James Cook University, Australia in 1991. Her research focuses on how coral reefs and other marine ecosystems are affected by environmental changes associated with global climate change, such as increases in sea surface temperature and ocean acidification. Dr. Kleypas has testified at three separate U.S. Congressional hearings regarding the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems.

Frank J. Millero is a professor of marine and physical chemistry at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. Dr. Millero earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Carnegie-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×

Mellon University in 1965. His general research interest is in the application of physical chemical principles to natural waters to understand how ionic interactions affect the thermodynamics and kinetics of processes occurring in the oceans. He is presently involved in studies synthesizing the global CO2 cycle in the world oceans, including an understanding of the flux of fossil fuel CO2 into the deep ocean. He is also interested in the role of iron as a plant nutrient and its effect on the flux of CO2 to the deep ocean. He is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board and has served on two previous NRC committees.

Ulf Riebesell is the head of biological oceanography at the Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences in Kiel, Germany. Dr. Riebesell earned a Ph.D. in biological oceanography from the University of Bremen, Germany in 1991. His research focuses on the sensitivity of marine organisms and ecosystems to ocean change (e.g., ocean acidification, ocean warming, changing redox conditions), the oceanic carbon cycle, the stoichiometry of marine elemental cycles, biomineralization, the biogeochemistry of stable isotopes, and paleoproxy-calibrations. He has organized and participated in numerous international conferences on ocean acidification.

STAFF

Susan Roberts became the director of the Ocean Studies Board in April 2004. Dr. Roberts received her Ph.D. in marine biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Berkeley and as a senior staff fellow at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Roberts’ past research experience has included fish muscle physiology and biochemistry, marine bacterial symbioses, and developmental cell biology. She has directed a number of studies for the Ocean Studies Board including Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay (2004); Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets (2003); Effects of Trawling & Dredging on Seafloor Habitat (2002); Marine Protected Areas: Tools for Sustaining Ocean Ecosystems (2001); Under the Weather: Climate, Ecosystems, and Infectious Disease (2001); Bridging Boundaries Through Regional Marine Research (2000); and From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean’s Role in Human Health (1999). Dr. Roberts specializes in the science and management of living marine resources.

Susan Park was a senior program officer with the Ocean Studies Board until the end of 2009. She received her Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Delaware in 2004. Susan was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Graduate Policy Fellow with the Ocean Studies Board in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×

2002 and joined the staff in 2006. She has worked on several reports with the National Academies, including Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, Review of Recreational Fisheries Survey Methods, Dynamic Changes in Marine Ecosystems, A Review of the Ocean Research Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy, and Tackling Marine Debris in the 21st Century. Prior to joining the Ocean Studies Board, Susan spent time working on aquatic invasive species management with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management and the Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel. She is currently Assistant Director for Research at Virginia Sea Grant.

Kathryn Hughes is a program officer with the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Prior to joining the NRC staff, Kathryn was a Science Policy Fellow with the American Chemical Society. She received her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Michigan, and holds a bachelors degree from Carleton College.

Heather Chiarello is a senior program assistant with the Ocean Studies Board. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from Central Michigan University in 2007 with a B.S. in political science with a concentration in public administration. Heather joined the National Academies in July 2008.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×
Page 161
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×
Page 162
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×
Page 163
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×
Page 164
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×
Page 165
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Research Council. 2010. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12904.
×
Page 166
Next: Appendix B: Acronyms »
Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $60.00 Buy Ebook | $47.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The ocean has absorbed a significant portion of all human-made carbon dioxide emissions. This benefits human society by moderating the rate of climate change, but also causes unprecedented changes to ocean chemistry. Carbon dioxide taken up by the ocean decreases the pH of the water and leads to a suite of chemical changes collectively known as ocean acidification. The long term consequences of ocean acidification are not known, but are expected to result in changes to many ecosystems and the services they provide to society. Ocean Acidification: A National Strategy to Meet the Challenges of a Changing Ocean reviews the current state of knowledge, explores gaps in understanding, and identifies several key findings.

Like climate change, ocean acidification is a growing global problem that will intensify with continued CO2 emissions and has the potential to change marine ecosystems and affect benefits to society. The federal government has taken positive initial steps by developing a national ocean acidification program, but more information is needed to fully understand and address the threat that ocean acidification may pose to marine ecosystems and the services they provide. In addition, a global observation network of chemical and biological sensors is needed to monitor changes in ocean conditions attributable to acidification.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!