National Academies Press: OpenBook

Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise (2010)

Chapter: Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings

« Previous: 6 Synthesis, Findings, and Recommendations
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×

APPENDIX A
Agendas for Public Meetings

AGENDA

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

National Academy of Sciences Building,

2100 C Street, N.W., Washington, DC

1:00-1:10 PM

Introductory Remarks and Introduction of Committee Members

Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D., Chair, Committee on Women’s Health Research

1:10-1:40 PM

Presentation of Study Charge

Wanda Jones, Dr.P.H., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health (Women’s Health), Office on Women’s Health, US Department of Health and Human Services

1:40-2:40 PM

Perspectives from Department of Health and Human Services Offices and Programs on Women’s Health

1:40-2:00

Vivian Pinn, M.D., Associate Director for Research on Women’s Health, National Institutes of Health

2:00-2:20

Kathleen Uhl, M.D., Director, Office of Women’s Health, Assistant Commissioner for Women’s Health, Food and Drug Administration

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×

 

2:20-2:40

Shakeh Kaftarian, Ph.D., Senior Advisor, Women’s Health and Gender Research, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

2:40-2:55 PM

Break

2:55-3:55 PM

Perspectives from Women’s Health Organizations

2:55-3:15

Phyllis Greenberger, M.S.W., President and Chief Executive Officer, Society for Women’s Health Research

3:15-3:35

Diana Zuckerman, Ph.D., President, National Research Center for Women and Families

3:35-3:55

Cindy Pearson, National Women’s Health Network

3:55-4:10 PM

Open Microphone for Statements from the Floor

4:10-4:30 PM

Comments on Study Charge

Mona Shah, J.D., M.P.H., Professional Staff Member, Office of Senator Barbara Mikulski (MD), United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

4:30-5:00 PM

Open Microphone for Statements from the Floor

5:00 PM

Adjourn Open Session

AGENDA

Thursday, May 7, 2009

The National Academies Keck Center, Washington, DC

1:00-1:10 PM

Introductory Remarks and Introduction of Committee Members

Nancy E. Adler, Ph.D., Chair, Committee on Women’s Health Research

1:10-1:30 PM

Priorities for Women’s Health Research

Kerri D. Schuiling, Ph.D., CNM, WHNP-BC, FACNM, Senior Staff Researcher, American College of Nurse-Midwives

1:30-1:50 PM

Research on Women Veterans

Linda Lipson, M.A., Scientific Program Manager, Women’s Health, Equity and Rural Health, Health Services Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×

 

Elizabeth Yano, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Deputy Director, Department of Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Health Services Research and Design, Center of Excellence for the Study of Healthcare Provider Behavior

1:50-2:20 PM

Physical and Mental Health Effects of Intimate Partner Violence and Areas of Needed Research

Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, Anna D. Wolf Chair, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing

2:20-2:50 PM

Research on Obesity and Eating Disorders

Madelyn Fernstrom, Ph.D., CNS, Professor of Psychiatry, Epidemiology, and Surgery; Director, Weight Management Center, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

2:50-3:05 PM

Break

3:05-3:35 PM

The Problem with Individualized Prevention

Beverly Rockhill Levine, Ph.D., M.A., Department of Public Health Education, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

3:35-4:05 PM

Measures of Health-Related Quality of Life

Dennis G. Fryback, Ph.D., Professor of Population Health Sciences and Industrial Engineering, Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×
Page 293
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×
Page 294
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×
Page 295
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12908.
×
Page 296
Next: Appendix B: Mortality Statistics »
Women's Health Research: Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $76.00 Buy Ebook | $59.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Even though slightly over half of the U.S. population is female, medical research historically has neglected the health needs of women. However, over the past two decades, there have been major changes in government support of women's health research--in policies, regulations, and the organization of research efforts. To assess the impact of these changes, Congress directed the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to ask the IOM to examine what has been learned from that research and how well it has been put into practice as well as communicated to both providers and women.

Women's Health Research finds that women's health research has contributed to significant progress over the past 20 years in lessening the burden of disease and reducing deaths from some conditions, while other conditions have seen only moderate change or even little or no change. Gaps remain, both in research areas and in the application of results to benefit women in general and across multiple population groups. Given the many and significant roles women play in our society, maintaining support for women's health research and enhancing its impact are not only in the interest of women, they are in the interest of us all.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!