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Page 160
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2011. Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation - Special Report 305. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13159.
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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2011. Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation - Special Report 305. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13159.
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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2011. Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation - Special Report 305. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13159.
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Page 163
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2011. Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation - Special Report 305. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13159.
×
Page 163
Page 164
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2011. Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation - Special Report 305. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13159.
×
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Page 165
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." Transportation Research Board. 2011. Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation - Special Report 305. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13159.
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Study Committee Biographical Information R. Keith Michel, Chair, is former President and current Board Chairman of Herbert Engineering Corporation. In more than 25 years with the com- pany, he has worked on design, specification development, and contract negotiations for containerships, bulk carriers, and tankers. Mr. Michel has served on numerous industry advisory groups developing guidelines for alternative tanker designs, including groups advising the International Maritime Organization and the U.S. Coast Guard. His work has included development of methodology, vessel models, and oil outflow analysis. He was a project engineer for the U.S. Coast Guard’s report on oil out- flow analysis for double-hull and hybrid tanker arrangements, which was part of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s technical report to Con- gress on the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. He has also worked on the devel- opment of salvage software used by the U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards, the U.S. Navy, the National Transportation Safety Board, the Maritime Administration, the American Bureau of Shipping, Lloyd’s, and numerous oil and shipping companies. Mr. Michel was chair of the Transportation Research Board’s Marine Board from 2002 through 2004 and has served on several National Research Council committees. Mr. Michel received a BS in naval architecture and marine engineering from the Webb Insti- tute of Naval Architecture. Bruce R. Ellingwood (Member, National Academy of Engineering) is Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is recognized for leadership in the use of probability and statistics in the design of structures and in the devel- opment of new design criteria. His main research and professional inter- ests concern the application of methods of probability and statistics to 160

Study Committee Biographical Information 161 support the practice of structural engineering. The role of structural design codes is to manage risk arising from the uncertainties inherent in struc- tural engineering and thereby ensure adequate public safety. Thus, the focal points of Dr. Ellingwood’s research have included probabilistic mod- eling of structural loads, statistical studies of the performance of structures, development of safety and serviceability criteria for structural design, studies of the response of structures to severe fires and other abnormal loads, and risk assessment of civil infrastructure projects. Dr. Ellingwood received a BS, an MS, and a PhD in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. George M. Hagerman, Jr., is a research faculty member at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University’s Advanced Research Insti- tute and Director of Offshore Wind Research for the Virginia Coastal Energy Research Consortium, a public–private–university partnership. Mr. Hagerman has almost 30 years of experience in evaluating and opti- mizing the design, performance, and economics of marine renewable energy systems, including offshore wind power, wave power, tidal power, and ocean thermal energy conversion. Mr. Hagerman served as an oceanographer on the Electric Power Research Institute’s Ocean Energy Team. He received a BS in zoology and an MS in marine sciences, both from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Jan Behrendt Ibsoe was recently named Vice President for Global Renew- able Energy at ABS Consulting. Earlier, he served as global director of renewable energy at Société Général de Surveillance in Germany and worked for 8 years at Det Norske Veritas (DNV) in Denmark. DNV is heavily involved in international standards development for offshore wind turbines. It has provided project certification for offshore wind tur- bines throughout Europe and in China and type certification for onshore wind turbines. Dr. Ibsoe’s focus in these positions has been offshore and onshore wind and solar energy. Previously, he worked in the offshore oil and gas industry. Dr. Ibsoe received an MS in civil engineering and a PhD in fatigue and fracture mechanics analyses of offshore welded struc- tures, both from the Technical University of Denmark. Lance Manuel is Professor and Fluor Centennial Teaching Fellow in the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at the

162 Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines University of Texas at Austin. His research work related to wind energy (funded by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board) has focused on the statistical analysis of inflow and turbine loads data, on characterization of the spatial coherence in inflow turbulence, and on establishing design loads using inverse reliability techniques. His work related to offshore wind turbines has included the consideration, in reliability analyses, of alternative foundation models for monopiles; nonlinear waves in shal- low waters; wind-wave correlation at near-shore sites; and the coupled dynamics in motions and loads on a spar buoy-supported floating off- shore wind turbine. He received a BTech in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (Bombay), an MS in civil engineering and applied mechanics from the University of Virginia, and a PhD in civil engineering from Stanford University. Walt Musial is a principal engineer at the National Renewable Energy Lab- oratory (NREL). He leads the offshore wind research at NREL, including offshore technology characterization, resource assessment, and technology development. He started at NREL as a test engineer on the unsteady aero- dynamics experiment. Mr. Musial led the testing team at NREL’s National Wind Technology Center and was responsible for building and operating NREL’s full-scale component facilities for testing wind turbine blades and drivetrains. Before joining NREL, he worked for 5 years in the commercial wind energy industry in California. He holds a BS and an MS in mechani- cal engineering from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Robert E. Sheppard is a principal consultant with Energo Engineering, an engineering consulting firm specializing in advanced analysis, integrity management, and risk and reliability. He has more than 20 years of expe- rience in structural engineering with a focus on assessment and repair of offshore structures and structural integrity management. He has exten- sive experience with design certification of offshore structures in addi- tion to third-party reviews of design and installation of offshore facilities. Mr. Sheppard has developed guidelines for the inspection of offshore wind turbine facilities, including the substructure, tower, nacelle, and blades. These projects blended the existing operating experience from offshore oil and gas facilities with the unique requirements of wind tur- bine facilities. Mr. Sheppard holds a BS in civil engineering from Rice

Study Committee Biographical Information 163 University and an MS in structural engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Emil Simiu is a fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technol- ogy (NIST), Structures Group. His research has included the estimation of wind and wave effects on buildings, bridges, and deepwater offshore plat- forms; structural reliability; and structural, fire, and chaotic dynamics. He has developed the database-assisted design concept and pioneered its systematic use for structures subject to wind loads. Dr. Simiu is a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE); served as chairman of its Committees on Wind Effects, Dynamic Effects, and the Reliability of Offshore Structures; and is a distinguished member of the ASCE Standard Committee on Loads. Before joining NIST, he worked as an engineer in the private sector. Dr. Simiu has served as a research professor at several uni- versities. He holds a degree in building engineering from the Bucharest Institute of Civil Engineering, an MS in applied mechanics from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, and a PhD in civil and geological engi- neering from Princeton University. Susan W. Stewart is a research associate in the Aerospace Engineering and Architectural Engineering Departments at the Pennsylvania State University. She was formerly with the Applied Research Laboratory at Pennsylvania State University as well as the Strategic Energy Institute at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on wind energy, energy efficiency, hybrid renewables systems, SmartGrid analysis, and renewable energy workforce development. She has performed technol- ogy assessments involving economic and efficiency analysis of offshore wind energy and has worked on wind energy resource assessment and offshore wind farm design, particularly in the South Atlantic Bight. She holds a BS in mechanical engineering from Pennsylvania State Univer- sity and an MS and a PhD in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. David J. Wisch is a Chevron Fellow at Chevron Energy Technology Company (ETC), Facilities Division. He currently is the Technical Team Lead of the Integrity Management Team in ETC’s Civil, Structural, and Marine Engineering Unit. He was previously the engineer of record for the first platform in the United States to undergo certification by a certified

164 Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines verification agent and provided engineering oversight for the world’s deepest self-standing structure. Mr. Wisch has been engaged for more than 30 years in industry standards development at the American Petro- leum Institute (API) and the International Organization for Standard- ization (ISO). He chaired the API committee on fixed platforms and led the U.S. delegation to the ISO offshore standards committee. After Hur- ricanes Ivan, Katrina, and Rita (2004–2005), he led an API task force to develop a consensus interim industry standard for mooring of floating drilling vessels. He served for 6 years on the Marine Board. Mr. Wisch received an MS in civil engineering from the University of Missouri–Rolla and has done postgraduate work in civil and structural engineering at Tulane University.

Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation - Special Report 305 Get This Book
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TRB Special Report 305: Structural Integrity of Offshore Wind Turbines: Oversight of Design, Fabrication, and Installation explores the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) approach to overseeing the development and safe operation of wind turbines on the outer continental shelf, with a focus on structural safety. The committee that developed the report recommended that in order to facilitate the orderly development of offshore wind energy and support the stable economic development of this nascent industry, the United States needs a set of clear requirements that can accommodate future design development.

The report recommends that BOEMRE develop a set of requirements that establish goals and objectives with regard to structural integrity, environmental performance, and energy generation. The committee found that the risks to human life and the environment associated with offshore wind farms are substantially lower than for other industries such as offshore oil and gas, because offshore wind farms are primarily unmanned and contain minimal quantities of hazardous substances. This finding implies that an approach with significantly less regulatory oversight may be taken for offshore wind farms. Under this approach, industry would be responsible for proposing sets of standards, guidelines, and recommended practices that meet the performance requirements established by BOEMRE.

The domestic industry can build on standards, guidelines, and practices developed in Europe, where the offshore wind energy is further developed, but will have to fill gaps such as the need to address wave and wind loadings encountered in hurricanes. The report also includes findings and recommendations about the role that certified verification agents (third party evaluators) can play in reviewing packages of standards and project-specific proposals.

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