National Academies Press: OpenBook

Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance (2011)

Chapter: Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

« Previous: Appendix B: Efforts to Model Workload and Resource Requirements
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×

Appendix C

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Peter Reuter (Chair) is professor in the School of Public Policy and the Department of Criminology at the University of Maryland. Previously, he was a senior economist at RAND Corporation, where he founded and directed RAND’s Drug Policy Research Center. His research is focused on the control of illegal markets and on drug policy. He has served as a consultant to numerous government agencies, including the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the National Institute of Justice, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and to foreign organizations, including the United Nations Drug Control Program and the British Department of Health. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University.

Frank D. Bean is chancellor’s professor in the School of Social Sciences and director of the Center for Research on Immigration, Population, and Public Policy at the University of California, Irvine. Previously he was a professor of sociology and public affairs and director of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been a visiting scholar at the Research School for Advanced Social Sciences at the Australian National University, the American Academy in Berlin, and the Russell Sage Foundation. His current research focuses on the implications of U.S. immigration policies, Mexican immigrant incorporation, the implications of immigration for changing race/ethnicity in the United States, the determinants and health consequences of immigrant naturalization, and the development of new estimates of unauthorized immigration and emigration. He has a Ph.D. from Duke University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×

Jonathan Caulkins is the H. Guyford Stever professor of operations research and professor of operations research and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University’s Qatar Campus and Heinz College. His work focuses on mathematical modeling and systems analysis of social policy problems, particularly issues pertaining to drugs, crime, violence, and crime prevention. He also works on software quality and optimal dynamic control applications in housing, counter-terror, and fashion. He is a past codirector of RAND’s Drug Policy Research Center and the founding director of RAND’s Pittsburgh office. He has a Ph.D. in operations research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Susan E. Clarke is a professor of political science at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where she is also director of the Center to Advance Research and Teaching in the Social Sciences, a campus-wide interdisciplinary program. Her research interests include local economic development, cross-border regionalism, democratic inclusion processes, and policy development. She has a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Wayne A. Cornelius is a distinguished professor of political science and founding director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). At UCSD, he also holds the Gildred chair in U.S.-Mexican relations and was the founding director of the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies. Formerly, he held positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard and Princeton universities. His current research focuses on the outcomes of immigration control policies in the United States and Spain, a study of political incorporation among U.S.-based Mexican immigrants, and annual surveys of high-emigration communities in central and southern Mexico. He has a Ph.D. in political science from Stanford University.

Victoria A. Greenfield is the Crowe chair in the Defense Industrial Base Department of Economics at the U.S. Naval Academy. Previously, she held positions at the RAND Corporation; the President’s Council of Economic Advisers; the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs at the U.S. Department of State; and Congressional Budget Office. Dr. Greenfield’s recent publications, including The World Heroin Market: Can Supply Be Cut? (2009, Oxford University Press), address international drug control policy and national security. She has a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

John R. Hipp is an associate professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. His research inter-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×

ests focus on how neighborhoods change over time, how that change both affects and is affected by neighborhood crime, and the role networks and institutions play in that change, approaching these questions with both quantitative methods social network analysis. He worked as part of an interdisciplinary team focusing on the networks of residents in a recently developed community in North Carolina. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Malay Majmundar (Program Officer) is on the staff of the National Research Council, where he has worked on a study of the fiscal future of the United States and is currently working on studies of the policy research and data needs to meet the challenge of aging in Asia, and estimating the illegal alien flow at the U.S. Southwest border. His research interests center on social policy and public administration. He has a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of Chicago and a J.D. from Yale University.

Douglas S. Massey is the Henry G. Bryant professor of sociology and public affairs and codirector of the Mexican Migration Project at the Office of Population Research at Princeton University. His research focuses on international migration, race and housing, discrimination, education, urban poverty, and Latin America, especially Mexico. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a past president of the Population Association of America and of the American Sociological Association (ASA), and a recipient of the Otis Dudley Duncan Award from ASA’s population section. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Princeton University.

Doris Meissner is a senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) where she directs MPI’s work on U.S. immigration policy and also works on immigration and national security, the politics of immigration, administering immigration systems and government agencies, and cooperation with other countries. Formerly, she served in many positions at the U.S. Department of Justice, including as commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). She serves on the boards of CARE-USA and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Inter-American Dialogue, and the Pacific Council on International Policy and a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. She has an M.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

C. Richard Neu is a senior economist at the RAND Corporation and the director of RAND’s representative office in Mexico City. Earlier in his

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×

career, he served as founding director of the RAND-Qatar Policy Institute, in Doha, Qatar, assistant to the president for research on counterterrorism, codirector of the unit that pursues research and analysis for private-sector clients, and associate dean of RAND’s Graduate School of Public Policy. Currently, he contributes to the activities of the RAND Business Leaders Forum, a regular gathering of Russian, European, and American business leaders, and in the research activities of the RAND Center for Middle East Public Policy. Previously, he served on the National Intelligence Council, in the National Security and International Affairs Division of the Congressional Budget Office, and as a senior international economist at the First National Bank of Chicago. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University.

Pia Orrenius is a senior economist and research officer at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. As a labor economist and member of the regional group, she analyzes the regional economy, with special focus on the border region. Her research also focuses on the causes and consequences of Mexico-U.S. migration, illegal immigration, and U.S. immigration policy. Previously, she served as senior economist on the Council of Economic Advisers in the Bush administration. She is a Tower Center fellow at the Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University, a research fellow at the IZA Institute of Labor in Bonn, Germany, and an adjunct professor at Baylor University (Dallas), where she teaches in the executive MBA program. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Roberto Osegueda is vice president for research, Office of Research and Sponsored Projects at the University of Texas at El Paso. His research interests have focused on several multidisciplinary fields, including nondestructive damage evaluation of structures; experimental and analytical modal analysis; semi-active control of structures; finite element applications; nondestructive damage evaluation for aging aircraft and civil structures; effects of overweights on bridges; routing of overweight vehicles; geographic information systems; laser methods for inspecting structures; artificial neural networks; and data fusion methodologies to process nondestructive evaluation information. He has a Ph.D. in civil engineering (structural and engineering mechanics) from Texas A&M University.

Jeffrey S. Passel is senior demographer at the Pew Hispanic Center for the Pew Research Center. Formerly, he served as principal research associate at the Labor, Human Services, and Population Center of the Urban Institute. His work focuses on immigrant populations in America, including such topics as undocumented immigration, the economic and fiscal impact of the foreign born, and the impact of welfare reform on immi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×

grant populations. He has a Ph.D. in social relations from Johns Hopkins University.

F. Stevens Redburn (Study Director) is a member of the staff of the National Research Council, as well as an adjunct professor in the School of Public Policy and Public Administration of George Washington University. Previously, he directed studies for the National Academy of Public Administration, and he has served as chair or member of many of its study panels. He also held positions at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and served as senior budget adviser on the Kosovo V project of the U.S. Agency for International Development. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. He has a Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cristina Rodriguez resigned from the committee in January 2011 to accept an appointment to the Office of Legal Counsel at the U.S. Department of Justice. Prior to this appointment, she was the Henry L. Stimson visiting professor at Harvard University Law School and a professor of law at New York University School of Law. She is a nonresident fellow of the Migration Policy Institute, a nonpartisan think tank focused on the study of global migration, where she is developing a database of all immigration-related legislation introduced in state legislatures between 2001 and 2008. She has a J.D. from Yale Law School.

Marc R. Rosenblum is a specialist in immigration policy at the Congressional Research Service (CRS) and an associate professor of political science at the University of New Orleans. Prior to joining CRS, he was a senior policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute. His work has focused on immigration, immigration policy, and U.S.-Latin American relations. As a Council on Foreign Relations Fellow, he worked in the office of Senator Edward Kennedy during the 2006-2007 immigration debate, and he served as a member of President-Elect Obama’s immigration policy transition team. He has a Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego.

Peter H. Schuck is the Simeon E. Baldwin professor emeritus of law and adjunct professor of Law at Yale Law School for which he previously served as deputy dean. His major fields of teaching and research are tort law; immigration, citizenship, and refugee law; groups, diversity, and law; and administrative law. Prior to joining Yale, he was principal deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. He has a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×
Page 147
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×
Page 148
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×
Page 149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×
Page 150
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×
Page 151
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2011. Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13271.
×
Page 152
Next: References »
Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement: A Path to Better Performance Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $44.00 Buy Ebook | $35.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Immigration enforcement is carried out by a complex legal and administrative system, operating under frequently changing legislative mandates and policy guidance, with authority and funding spread across several agencies in two executive departments and the courts. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is responsible for conducting immigration enforcement both at the border and in the United States; the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is responsible for conducting immigration removal procedures and criminal trials and for prosecuting people charged with immigration-related crimes. DOJ confronts at least five technical challenges to modeling its resource needs for immigration enforcement that are specific to the immigration enforcement system. Despite the inherent limitations, budgeting for immigration enforcement can be improved by changing the method for budgeting.

Budgeting for Immigration Enforcement addresses how to improve budgeting for the federal immigration enforcement system, specifically focusing on the parts of that system that are operated and funded by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ). The report recommends that DOJ establish policy-level procedures to plan and coordinate policy planning and implementation to improve performance of the immigration enforcement system. The report also recommends that DOJ and DHS accelerate their design of an integrated capacity to track cases and project immigration enforcement activity. Policy makers and others who are interested in how the nation's immigration enforcement system is organized and operates also will find it useful.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!