National Academies Press: OpenBook

Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States (2012)

Chapter: Appendix E: Select Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Select Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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E
Select Acronyms and Abbreviations

Acetyl-CoA

Acetyl-coenzyme A

B20

A blend of 20 percent biodiesel and 80 percent petroleum diesel and is the most common biodiesel blend in the United States

B100

100 percent biodiesel

CAFOs

Concentrated animal feeding operations

CO

Carbon monoxide

CO2

Carbon dioxide

DAF

Dissolved air flotation

DAP

diammonium phosphate

DGAT

Diacylglycerol acyltransferase

DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid

DOE

U.S. Department of Energy

DOE-EERE

U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

DW

Dry weight

E10

A blend of up to 10 percent ethanol and the balance petroleum-based gasoline

E15

A blend of up to 15 percent ethanol and the balance petroleum-based gasoline

E85

A blend of up to 85 percent ethanol and the balance petroleum-based gasoline. For the past several years, E85 sold in the United States has averaged about 75 percent ethanol.

EIOLCA

Economic input-output approach to life-cycle assessment

EPA

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

EROI

Energy return on investment

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Select Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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EROWI

Energy return on water invested

FAME

Fatty-acid methyl ester

FFV

Flex fuel vehicle

F-T

Fischer-Tropsch

GBEP

Global Bioenergy Partnership

GHG

Greenhouse gas

GIS

Geographic information systems

GREET

Greenhouse gases, regulated emissions, and energy use in transportation

IH2

Integrated hydropyrolysis and hydroconversion

ILUC

Indirect land-use change

KOH

Potassium hydroxide

LCA

Life-cycle assessment

LUC

Land-use change

N

Nitrogen

NASA

National Aeronautic and Space Administration

NER

Net energy ratio

NEV

Net energy value

NH3

Ammonia

NOx

Nitrogen oxides

NRC

National Research Council

OBP

Office of the Biomass Program

OMEGA

Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae

P

Phosphorus

PAR

Photosynthetically active radiation

R&D

Research and development

RNA

Ribonucleic acid

RSB

Roundtable on Sustainable Biofuels

Rubisco

Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase

Si

Silicon

SO2

sulfur dioxide

SVR

Surface to volume ratio

TAGs

Triacylglycerols

TSCA

Toxic Substances Control Act

VCSS

Vapor compression steam stripping

VOCs

Volatile organic compounds

WWTP

Wastewater treatment plant

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Select Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
×
Page 223
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Select Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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Page 224
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Biofuels made from algae are gaining attention as a domestic source of renewable fuel. However, with current technologies, scaling up production of algal biofuels to meet even 5 percent of U.S. transportation fuel needs could create unsustainable demands for energy, water, and nutrient resources. Continued research and development could yield innovations to address these challenges, but determining if algal biofuel is a viable fuel alternative will involve comparing the environmental, economic and social impacts of algal biofuel production and use to those associated with petroleum-based fuels and other fuel sources. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels was produced at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy.

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