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Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey (2013)

Chapter: Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
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Appendix E

Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda

Household Survey Producers Workshop
June 1–2, 2011
20 F Street NW Conference Center
Washington, DC 20001

AGENDA

June 1, 2011
8:30–9:15 a.m.

Welcome and Purpose of Workshop

Connie Citro, Director, Committee on National Statistics

Mike Horrigan, Associate Commissioner, Office of Prices and Living Conditions, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Don Dillman, Panel Chair, Washington State University

9:15–10:45

Session 1: Alternative Ways of Measuring Consumer Expenditures with Special Focus on International Examples

Chair: Mel Stephens, Panel Member, University of Michigan

• Canadian Survey of Household Spending, Guylaine Dubreuil, Statistics Canada

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
×

• UK Living Costs and Food Survey, Giles Horsfield, Office of National Statistics

• Household Budget Surveys in the European Union, Peter Paul Borg, European Union

• Discussant: Robert Gillingham, Panel Member, Independent Consultant

10:45–11:00 Break
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Session 2: Designs That Add Flexibility in Data Collection Mode

Chair: Mark Pierzchala, Panel Member, Independent Consultant

• Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, Jolene Smyth, University of Nebraska

• Business R&D Innovation Survey, Richard Hough, Census Bureau

• National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, Jennifer Wine, RTI

• Discussant: Mick Couper, Panel Member, University of Michigan

12:30–1:45 Working Lunch to Discuss Afternoon Sessions
1:45–3:15

Session 3: Designs That Effectively Mix Data from Multiple Surveys and/or External/ Administrative Data to Produce Estimates

Chair: Bruce Meyer, Panel Member, University of Chicago

• Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), Steve Machlin, AHRQ

• Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), Eileen O’Brien, EIA

• Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and the National Health Interview Survey: Combining Data for Small Area Estimates, Van Parsons, NCHS

• Discussant: Clyde Tucker, Panel Member, Independent Consultant

3:15–3:30 Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
×
3:30–5:00

Session 4: Designs That Effectively Mix Global and Detail Information to Reduce Burden and Measurement Error

Chair: Rob Santos, Panel Member, Urban Institute

• Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS), Dave Aune, NASS

• Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), Jason Fields, Census Bureau

• National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), Jane Gentleman, NCHS

• Discussant: Andy Peytchev, Panel Member, RTI

5:00

Working Dinner at Art & Soul to Discuss Day’s Events

7:00

Planned Adjournment

June 2, 2011
8:30–10:00 a.m.

Session 5: Designs That Use “Event History” Methodology to Improve Recall and Reduce Measurement Error in Recall Surveys

Chair: David Betson, Panel Member, University of Notre Dame

• Panel Survey of Income Dynamics, Frank Stafford, University of Michigan

• Survey of Income and Program Participation, Jason Fields, Census Bureau

• Discussant: Michael Schober, Panel Member, New School for Social Research

10:00–10:30 Break
10:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Session 6: Diary Surveys That Effectively Utilize Technology to Facilitate Recordkeeping or Recall

Chair: Sarah Nusser, Panel Member, Iowa State University

• National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FOODAPS), Nancy Cole, Mathematica Policy Research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
×

• Personal Diary and Survey Methodologies for Health and Environmental Data Collection, Paul Kizakevich, Research Triangle Institute

• Nielsen Life360 Program, Justin Bailey, The Nielsen Company

• Discussant: Michael Link, Panel Member, Nielsen

12:00–12:30 Closing, Wrap-up

Don Dillman, Panel Chair, Washington State University

12:30 Planned Adjournment
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
×
Page 229
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
×
Page 230
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
×
Page 231
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Household Survey Producers Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2013. Measuring What We Spend: Toward a New Consumer Expenditure Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13520.
×
Page 232
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The Consumer Expenditure (CE) surveys are the only source of information on the complete range of consumers' expenditures and incomes in the United States, as well as the characteristics of those consumers. The CE consists of two separate surveys: (1) a national sample of households interviewed five times at three-month intervals; and (2) a separate national sample of households that complete two consecutive one-week expenditure diaries. For more than 40 years, these surveys, the responsibility of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), have been the principal source of knowledge about changing patterns of consumer spending in the U.S. population.

In February 2009, BLS initiated the Gemini Project, the aim of which is to redesign the CE surveys to improve data quality through a verifiable reduction in measurement error with a particular focus on underreporting. The Gemini Project initiated a series of information-gathering meetings, conference sessions, forums, and workshops to identify appropriate strategies for improving CE data quality. As part of this effort, BLS requested the National Research Council's Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) to convene an expert panel to build on the Gemini Project by conducting further investigations and proposing redesign options for the CE surveys.

The charge to the Panel on Redesigning the BLS Consumer Expenditure Surveys includes reviewing the output of a Gemini-convened data user needs forum and methods workshop and convening its own household survey producers workshop to obtain further input. In addition, the panel was tasked to commission options from contractors for consideration in recommending possible redesigns. The panel was further asked by BLS to create potential redesigns that would put a greater emphasis on proactive data collection to improve the measurement of consumer expenditures. Measuring What We Spend summarizes the deliberations and activities of the panel, discusses the conclusions about the uses of the CE surveys and why a redesign is needed, as well as recommendations for the future.

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