National Academies Press: OpenBook

Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer (1991)

Chapter: Appendix F: List of Background Documents

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: List of Background Documents." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1814.
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F

List of Background Documents

For this study, the Institute of Medicine invited and commissioned reports on various topics concerning oral contraceptives and breast cancer. Four of these reports appear in this volume (Appendix A, Appendix B, Appendix D, and Appendix E). The manuscripts of eight other of these documents are available from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161; telephone 703-487-4650. NTIS document numbers are in parentheses.

“History of Oral Contraception,” Richard A. Edgren, Director, Scientific Affairs, Syntex Laboratories, Inc., Palo Alto, Calif. (#PB91-186841)

“Safety of Oral Contraception,” Richard A. Edgren, Director, Scientific Affairs, Syntex Laboratories, Inc., Palo Alto, Calif. (#PB91-186858)

“The Demographics of Oral Contraceptive Use,” Jacqueline Darroch Forrest, Vice President for Research, The Alan Guttmacher Institute, New York, N.Y. (#PB91-186833)

“Hormone Effects on Biological Markers in Breast Cancer,” Kenneth S. McCarty, Jr., and Kenneth S. McCarty, Sr., Departments of Biochemistry, Pathology, and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C. (#PB91-186825)

“Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer: A Review of the Epidemio-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: List of Background Documents." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1814.
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logical Evidence,” Kathleen E. Malone, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. (Appendix A)

“Summary Table of Studies of Breast Cancer Risk Related to Oral Contraceptive Use (December 11, 1989),” Kathleen E. Malone, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. (#PB91-186973)

“Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer: Review of the Epidemiological Literature,” David B. Thomas, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. (Appendix B)

“Age-Specific Differences in the Relationship Between Oral Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer,” Phyllis A. Wingo, Nancy C. Lee, Howard W. Ory, Valerie Beral, Herbert B. Peterson, and P. Rhoades, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga. (#PB91-186551)

“Animal Models of Sex Steroid Hormones and Mammary Cancer: Are There Lessons for Our Understanding of Studies in Humans?” Diana B. Petitti, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California School of Medicine, San Francisco, Calif. (Appendix D)

“Risks and Benefits of Oral Contraceptives: Will Breast Cancer Tip the Balance?” David C. G. Skegg, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. (Appendix E)

“Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer: Issues Related to Age, Duration of Use, Dose, and Latent Effects,” James J. Schlesselman, Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics, School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Md. (#PB91-186569)

“Modeling Risks and Benefits of Oral Contraceptives,” Judith Fortney and Michele Bonhomme, Division of Reproductive Epidemiology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Family Health International, Research Triangle Park, N.C. (#PB91-186817)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: List of Background Documents." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1814.
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Page 175
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: List of Background Documents." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1814.
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Page 176
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Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer Get This Book
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At least 10.7 million American women use oral contraceptives (OCs). The potential connection with breast cancer has caused concern among these OC users and uncertainty among many of their physicians. This new volume offers the most up-to-date information available on this critical topic.

While the best available knowledge does not support any fundamental change in clinical practice with respect to the use of OCs, this book offers specific recommendations for more research to fully resolve the relationship between OCs and breast cancer. Noting consumer confusion, the volume includes a concise summary of benefits, risks, and other practical information for contraceptive users and their doctors.

The volume presents current data on changes in patterns of OC use, differences in risk at different ages, the benefits of OCs, and more.

Oral Contraceptives and Breast Cancer will be important reading for obstetricians/gynecologists and other health professionals, their patients who use OCs, contraceptive manufacturers, women's health advocates, policymakers, and researchers.

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