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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force

A Workshop Summary

Gregory Eyring, Rapporteur

Committee on Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop

Air Force Studies Board

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.

www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS   500 Fifth Street, NW   Washington, DC 20001

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

This is a report of work supported by Grant FA9550-12-1-0413 between the U.S. Air Force and the National Academy of Sciences. Any opinions, findings, or conclusions expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project.

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International Standard Book Number 10: 0-309-27261-0

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Charles M. Vest is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. Charles M. Vest are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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COMMITTEE ON ZERO-SUSTAINMENT AIRCRAFT FOR THE U.S. AIR FORCE: A WORKSHOP

CLAUDE M. BOLTON, JR., Defense Acquisition University

CLAUDE V. CHRISTIANSON, National Defense University

THOM J. HODGSON, North Carolina State University

RONALD MUTZELBURG, Boeing Phantom Works (retired)

LYLE H. SCHWARTZ, University of Maryland at College Park

RAYMOND VALEIKA, Delta Airlines (retired)

Staff

CARTER W. FORD, Program Officer

SARAH M. CAPOTE, Research Associate

MARGUERITE E. SCHNEIDER, Administrative Coordinator

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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AIR FORCE STUDIES BOARD

GREGORY S. MARTIN, GS Martin Consulting, Chair

BRIAN A. ARNOLD, Raytheon Company

CLAUDE M. BOLTON, Defense Acquisition University

STEVEN R.J. BRUECK, University of New Mexico

THOMAS J. BURNS, Science Applications International Corporation

FRANK CAPPUCCIO, Cappuccio and Associates, LLC

DONALD C. FRASER, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (retired)

MICHAEL J. GIANELLI, The Boeing Company (retired)

DANIEL HASTINGS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

PAUL G. KAMINSKI, Technovation, Inc.

ROBERT LATIFF, R. Latiff Associates

NANCY G. LEVESON, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MARK J. LEWIS, IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute

LESTER L. LYLES, The Lyles Group

MATT L. MLEZIVA, Wildwood Strategic Concepts

C. KUMAR N. PATEL, Pranalytica, Inc.

GERALD F. PERRYMAN, JR., Independent Consultant

RICHARD V. REYNOLDS, The VanFleet Group, LLC

J. DANIEL STEWART, University of Tennessee

REBECCA WINSTON, Winston Strategic Management Consulting

Staff

TERRY J. JAGGERS, Director

JESSICA R. BROKENBURR, Financial Assistant

SARAH M. CAPOTE, Research Associate

GREGORY EYRING, Senior Program Officer

CARTER W. FORD, Program Officer

CHRIS JONES, Financial Manager

MARGUERITE E. SCHNEIDER, Administrative Coordinator

DANIEL E.J. TALMAGE, JR., Program Officer

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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Preface

The Air Force recognizes that sustainment of legacy weapon systems is a strategic issue for the United States. To assist the Air Force in addressing this issue, the Air Force Studies Board of the National Research Council drafted terms of reference (TOR) in April 2012 for a short workshop to bring together Department of Defense organizations and industry to highlight current sustainment practices that the Air Force might leverage to reduce maintenance and sustainment costs in the near term. The National Research Council approved the TOR in July 2012. The 3-day workshop was then held on December 4-6, 2012, at the National Academy of Sciences Building in Washington, D.C.1

The committee is grateful for the support of the Air Force champion of this workshop, Lt Gen Judith Fedder, Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Installations, and Mission Support, Headquarters Air Force. Lt Gen Fedder articulated a set of clear desired outcomes for the workshop prior to the workshop and in person at the workshop. In addition, the committee thanks the many expert speakers and guests who contributed to this activity. Finally, the committee’s role was limited to planning the workshop, and the workshop summary has been prepared by the workshop rapporteur as a factual summary of what occurred at the workshop.

Claude M. Bolton, Jr., Chair

Committee on Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the

U.S. Air Force: A Workshop

___________________

1This is the second in a series of workshops conducted by the Air Force Studies Board at the request of the U.S. Air Force. It follows an earlier workshop titled “Energy Reduction at U.S. Air Force Facilities Using Industrial Processes,” held on November 5-7, 2012.

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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Acknowledgment of Reviewers

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report:

Claude V. Christianson, National Defense University,

Nancy G. Leveson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

Eli Reshotko, Case Western Reserve University, and

Raymond Valeika, Delta Airlines (retired).

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the views presented at the workshop, nor did they see the final draft of the workshop summary before its release. The review of this workshop summary was overseen by Wesley L. Harris, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Appointed by the NRC, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this workshop summary was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this summary rests entirely with the author and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
×
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
×

Acronyms

ACAT acquisition category
AFLCMC Air Force Life Cycle Management Center
AFMC Air Force Materiel Command
AFRL Air Force Research Laboratory
AFSAC Air Force Security Assistance Center
AFMC Army Force Materiel Command
AFSC Air Force Sustainment Center
AIM automotive information module
ALC Air Logistics Complex
AMC Air Mobility Command
APU auxiliary power unit
 
BCA business case analysis
 
CFLI core function lead integrator
CLS contractor logistics support
 
DAU Defense Acquisition University
DLA Defense Logistics Agency
DLR depot-level repair
DoD Department of Defense
 
E2E end to end
ERP enterprise resource planning
 
FY fiscal year
 
ISR intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance
 
KPP key performance parameter
KSA key system attribute
 
LCC life cycle cost
LHA Logistics Health Assessment
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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LO low observable
 
MAJCOM major command
 
NAVAIR naval aviation
NRC National Research Council
 
OCO overseas contingency operations
OEM original equipment manufacturer
 
P&W Pratt and Whitney
PEO Program Executive Office
PM program manager
PSI product support integrator
PSM program support manager
 
R&D research and development
 
S&T science and technology
 
TOR terms of reference
 
VEMSO Vehicle and Equipment Management Support Office
 
WSS weapon system sustainment
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2013. Zero-Sustainment Aircraft for the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18295.
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Overall Air Force weapon system sustainment (WSS) costs are growing at more than 4 percent per year, while budgets have remained essentially flat. The cost growth is due partly to aging of the aircraft fleet, and partly to the cost of supporting higher-performance aircraft and new capabilities provided by more complex and sophisticated systems, such as the latest intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) platforms. Furthermore, the expectation for the foreseeable future is that sustainment budgets are likely to decrease, so that the gap between budgets and sustainment needs will likely continue to grow wider. Most observers accept that the Air Force will have to adopt new approaches to WSS if it is going to address this problem and remain capable of carrying out its missions.

In this context, the original intent of this 3-day workshop was to focus on ways that science and technology (S&T) could help the Air Force reduce sustainment costs. However, as the workshop evolved, the discussions focused more and more on Air Force leadership, management authority, and culture as the more critical factors that need to change in order to solve sustainment problems. Many participants felt that while S&T investments could certainly help--particularly if applied in the early stages ("to the left") of the product life cycle--adopting a transformational management approach that defines the user-driven goals of the enterprise, empowers people to achieve them, and holds them accountable, down to the shop level. Several workshop participants urged Air Force leaders to start the process now, even though it will take years to percolate down through the entire organization. These sustainment concerns are not new and have been studied extensively, including recent reports from the National Research Council's Air Force Studies Board and the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board.

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