National Academies Press: OpenBook

Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of the Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: Workshop Summary (2013)

Chapter: 6 Presentation on the First Thousand Days Program

« Previous: 5 Session 3: Implementing the Guidelines
Suggested Citation:"6 Presentation on the First Thousand Days Program." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of the Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18410.
×

6

Presentation on the First Thousand Days Program

Patrick Catalano introduced the next speaker, Richard Sass. Sass founded the Contact Wellness Foundation as his personal contribution to health care reform, reflecting his desire to move beyond his previous work in the delivery of innovative medical products to the creation of motivational tools leading to positive health behavior changes.

RICHARD SASS, CHAIRMAN, CONTACT WELLNESS FOUNDATION

The First Thousand Days program, which focused on children from conception through 2 years of age, includes a wellness algorithm and is based on the relatively new science of the developmental origins of health and disease. If the fetus is biologically programmed by the mother from the very point of conception, then it is all the more urgent to direct pregnant women who are at risk of diabetes, obesity, and other chronic conditions into preventive care as early as possible.

Compared with the standard prenatal protocol, the First Thousand Days protocol increases both the frequency and the duration of time a woman is involved in prenatal care. The standard prenatal protocol consists of 11 10-minute visits; the First Thousand Days protocol calls for an additional 40 hours of visits. Using a mental health promotion approach, the program encourages each pregnant woman to assemble her own small group of six or eight people, which might include her mother,

Suggested Citation:"6 Presentation on the First Thousand Days Program." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of the Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18410.
×

grandmothers, husband or significant other, neighbors, or friends, and would meet weekly in a loving and supportive atmosphere to talk about weight gain and other health-related goals and objectives. To the extent that the group is successful in encouraging the woman to improve her metabolic function, normalize her glucose, exercise more, and make healthy behavioral choices, it can help set the stage for a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby.

The proposed protocol has three additional elements: (1) a facilitator for the group, who would meet with the group initially and then be available by cell phone and e-mail; (2) a toolkit that includes glucose monitoring, A1C monitoring, resources for calculating and tracking BMI and blood pressure measurements, and other tools to help the pregnant woman monitor her progress throughout her pregnancy; and (3) a $1,000 529 education savings plan for the baby as an incentive to motivate the mother to reach her goals for her 40 weeks of pregnancy. The money in the plan would be available for the child to use for higher education or vocational school.

The Contact Wellness Foundation is seeking funding for the project from foundations and other sources, including Wall Street. The ultimate goal of the project is to develop a large demonstration across an entire state, which could be marketed to the rest of the country as a for-profit activity through the sales of the toolkit and social impact bonds.

Suggested Citation:"6 Presentation on the First Thousand Days Program." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of the Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18410.
×
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"6 Presentation on the First Thousand Days Program." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2013. Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of the Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18410.
×
Page 56
Next: 7 Session 4: Collaborating for Action »
Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of the Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $40.00 Buy Ebook | $31.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Since 1990, when the last guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy were issued, the average body weight of women entering their childbearing years has increased considerably, with a greater percentage of these women now classified as overweight or obese. Women of childbearing age are also more likely to have chronic conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes and to be at risk for poor maternal and child health outcomes. All of these factors increase the likelihood of poor pregnancy outcomes for women and their infants. As part of the continuing effort of The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Research Council (NRC) to promote the revised pregnancy weight gain guidelines recommended in their 2009 study Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines, the IOM and NRC convened a workshop in March, 2013, to engage interested stakeholders, organizations, and federal agencies in a discussion of issues related to encouraging behavior change that would reflect the updated guidelines on weight gain during pregnancy. During the workshop, the IOM and NRC presented newly developed information resources to support guidance based on the recommendations of the 2009 report.

Leveraging Action to Support Dissemination of the Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines summarizes the workshop's keynote address and the various presentations and discussions from the workshop, highlighting issues raised by presenters and attendees. Interested stakeholders, organizations, health professionals, and federal agencies met to discuss issues related to encouraging behavior change that would reflect the updated guidelines on weight gain during pregnancy. This report discusses conceptual products as well as products developed for dissemination, ways to facilitate and support behavior change to achieve healthy weight pre- and postpregnancy, and how to put the weight gain guidelines into action to implement change.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!