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Report of the Committee on Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome (1988)

Chapter: APPENDIX B: Curricula Vitae of Committee Members

« Previous: APPENDIX A: Glossary
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: Curricula Vitae of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1988. Report of the Committee on Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18430.
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Page 98
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: Curricula Vitae of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1988. Report of the Committee on Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18430.
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Page 99
Suggested Citation:"APPENDIX B: Curricula Vitae of Committee Members." National Research Council. 1988. Report of the Committee on Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18430.
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Page 100

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APENDIX B CURRICULA VITAE OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS BRUCE ALBERTS received a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University and is a professor of biochemistry at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and conducts research on the structure and function of natural DNA-protein complexes, the chemistry of DNA replication, and eukaryotic gene activation. DAVID BOTSTEIN holds a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan and serves as a professor of genetics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and conducts research on the genetics of the cytoskeleton and cell cycle in yeast, secretion of proteins in yeast and bacteria, and the use of DNA polymorphisms to construct linkage maps in humans. SYDNEY BRENNER was educated at the University of the Witwatersrand and Oxford University (D.Phil.) and is now a member of the scientific staff of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology and a fellow of Kings College, Cambridge. He is a fellow of the Royal Society, a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Lasker award. His research interests include molecular biology of development and gene mapping and sequencing. CHARLES CANTOR received a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley and is now a professor and chairman of genetics and development at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. His research focuses on methods for handling very large nucleic acids and proteins and on the structure of complex nucleoproteins, such as chromosomes and viruses. RUSSELL DOOLITTLE earned his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University and is now a professor of chemistry at the University of California, San Diego. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, he does research on the structure and function of fibrinogen and the evolution of proteins. LEROY HOOD holds an M.D. degree from the Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. degree from the California Institute of Technology, where he is now a professor of biology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a recipient of the Lasker award. His principal research interests are in the molecular biology of the major histocompatibility complex and the T-cell receptor genes, as well as the development of instrumentation for molecular biology. 98

VICTOR McKUSICK earned an M.D. degree from the Johns Hopkins University, where he is now a professor of medical genetics. He was for 12 years chairman of the Department of Medicine and physician-in-chief of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (London). His research is concerned with human genetics. DANIEL NATHANS received the M.D. degree from Washington University and is now a professor of molecular biology and genetics and senior investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the Johns Hopkins University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the recipient of a Nobel Prize in medicine. His research is focused on genes involved in cell proliferation. MAYNARD OLSON earned his Ph.D. in chemistry at Stanford University. He is currently a professor of genetics at the Washington University School of Medicine, where he does research on the structure and function of eukaryotic genes. STUART ORKIN received his M.D. degree from the Harvard University School of Medicine, where he is now the Leland Fikes Professor of Pediatric Medicine and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His major research interests include molecular genetics and the biology of human disease. LEON ROSENBERG received his M.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin. He currently serves as a professor and dean of the medical school at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine. His research on medical genetics focuses on membrane function, mitochondrial enzymes, and inherited disorders of amino acid metabolism. FRANCIS RUDDLE received his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley. He is now a professor of biology and human genetics at Yale University. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and conducts research on somatic cell genetics and differentiation. SHIRLEY TILGHMAN earned her Ph.D. degree in biochemistry from Temple University and is now a professor of life sciences at Princeton University. Her own research interests include mammalian molecular genetics. 99

JOHN TOOZE received his Ph.D. degree from London University. He is now the executive secretary of the European Molecular Biology Organization. He conducts research on the cell and molecular biology of secretion at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg. JAMES WATSON holds a Ph.D. degree from Indiana University and numerous honorary degrees. He is director of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. He received the Lasker Prize and the Nobel Prize in medicine. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a foreign member of the Royal Society (London). 100

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