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Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making (2013)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
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Appendix A

Biographies of Committee Members

Diana L. Burley, Co-Chair, is associate professor in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at George Washington University (GW). Dr. Burley joined GW in 2007 and has served as the inaugural chair of the Human and Organizational Learning Department and as director of the Executive Leadership Doctoral Program. Prior to joining the GW faculty, she served as a program officer in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources at the National Science Foundation (NSF), where she managed multimillion-dollar grant programs designed to increase the capacity of the U.S. higher education enterprise to produce scientists. At NSF she served as the lead program officer of the Federal Cyber Service Scholarship (Cyber Corps) program, and based on her work, Dr. Burley was honored by the Federal Chief Information Officers Council and the Colloquium on Information Systems Security Education for outstanding efforts toward the development of the federal cybersecurity workforce. She is a frequent contributor to the national cybersecurity forums, such as the National Initiative on Cyber Security Education (NICE) Workshop, the Federal Information Systems Security Educators’ Association Conference, and the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Software Assurance Forum. Most recently, Dr. Burley was appointed to the 2012 Commonwealth of Virginia Joint Commission on Technology and Science Cyber Security Committee. In addition, she serves as the co-principal investigator (co-PI) for Curriculum and Research of National CyberWatch, an NSF-funded cybersecurity research and education center. She is one of two GW representatives to the Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×

(I3P)—a consortium of leading institutions dedicated to strengthening the cyber infrastructure of the United States; a research scholar in the GW Institute for Public Policy; and a senior research scientist in the GW Cyber Security Research and Policy Institute. She holds an M.S. in public management and policy, an M.S. in organization science, and a Ph.D. in organization science and information technology from Carnegie Mellon University, where she studied as a Woodrow Wilson Foundation fellow in public policy.

Seymour (Sy) E. Goodman, Co-Chair, is professor of international affairs and computing, jointly at the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs and the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). He serves as co-director of both the Georgia Tech Information Security Center and the Center for International Strategy, Technology and Policy. Dr. Goodman’s research interests include international developments in the information technologies (IT), technology diffusion, IT and national security, and related public policy issues. Areas of geographic interest include the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and parts of Africa. Earlier research had been in areas of statistical and continuum physics, combinatorial algorithms, and software engineering. Current work includes research on the global diffusion of the Internet and the protection of large IT-based infrastructures. Immediately before coming to Georgia Tech, he was director of the Consortium for Research on Information Security and Policy at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, with an appointment in the Department of Engineering Economic Systems and Operations Research, both at Stanford University; and professor of management information systems and a member of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Arizona. Earlier tenured and visiting appointments have been at the University of Virginia (applied mathematics, computer science, and Soviet and East European studies), Princeton University (mathematics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs), and the University of Chicago (economics). Dr. Goodman is contributing editor for international perspectives for the Communications of the ACM and has served with many government, academic, professional society, and industry advisory and study groups. His research pursuits have taken him to all seven continents and about 100 countries and have included testimony before legislative bodies and ministerial-level briefings. He is currently PI on two large grants from NSF and the MacArthur Foundation. Dr. Goodman was an undergraduate at Columbia University, where he started as an aspiring English major, and obtained his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), where he worked on problems of applied mathematics and mathematical physics.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×

Matt Bishop is a professor of computer science at the University of California, Davis. He was a research scientist at the Research Institute of Advanced Computer Science and was on the faculty at Dartmouth College before joining the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Davis. His main research area is the analysis of vulnerabilities in computer systems, including modeling vulnerabilities, building tools to detect them, and ameliorating or eliminating them. This work includes detecting and handling all types of malicious logic. Dr. Bishop is active in the areas of network security, the study of denial of service attacks and defenses, policy modeling, software assurance testing, and formal modeling of access control. He has also become interested in electronic voting and was one of the two PIs of the California Top-to-Bottom Review, which performed a technical review of all electronic voting systems certified in the state of California. He is active in information assurance education. His textbook, Computer Security: Art and Science, was published in 2002. He also teaches software engineering, machine architecture, operating systems, programming, and computer security. He received his Ph.D. in computer science in 1984 from Purdue University, where he specialized in computer security.

Mischel L. Kwon is the president of Mischel Kwon and Associates, LLC, a security consulting firm specializing in technical defensive security, security operations and information assurance. She is an IT executive with more than 29 years of experience ranging from application design and development, network architecture and deployment, information assurance policy, audit and management, technical defensive security, and large wireless system security, to building organizational and national-level computer emergency/incident response/readiness teams. Most recently, as vice president of public sector security for RSA Security, Ms. Kwon was responsible for leading RSA in assisting public sector security solutions, strategies, technologies and policy. In June 2008, she was named the director for the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT), where she spearheaded the organization responsible for analyzing and reducing cyber threats and vulnerabilities in federal networks, disseminating cyber threat warning information, and coordinating national incident response activities. Ms. Kwon brings a unique blend of hands-on experience, academic research and training, and a seasoned understanding of how to build operational organizations from inception. Among her successes at the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), where she was deputy director for IT Security Staff, she built and deployed the Justice Security Operations Center to monitor and defend the DOJ network against cyber threats. In addition, she serves as an adjunct professor at George Washington University, where she also runs the George Washington Uni-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×

versity Cyber Defense Lab. Ms. Kwon holds an M.S. in computer science from Marymount University and a graduate certificate in computer security and information assurance.

Kevin R. Murphy is a consulting expert at Lamorinda Consulting, LLC and an affiliate faculty member in the Department of Psychology at Colorado State University. He was a Fulbright scholar at the University of Stockholm and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the American Psychological Society. He is the recipient of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology’s 2004 Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award. He served as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (1997-1998) and as associate editor and then editor of the Journal of Applied Psychology(1991-2002), as well as editor of Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice(2012-present). He is a member of the editorial boards of Human Performance, Personnel Psychology, Human Resource Management Review, International Journal of Management Reviews, Journal of Industrial Psychology, and International Journal of Selection and Assessment. He served as a member and chair of the Department of Defense Advisory Committee on Military Personnel Testing and has also served on four National Academy of Sciences committees, most recently the Committee to Review the Scientific Evidence on the Polygraph. He has served as an expert witness in more than 20 cases involving age, race, and sex discrimination. He is the author of more than 150 articles and book chapters and author or editor of 11 books, in areas ranging from psychometrics and statistical analysis to individual differences, performance assessment, gender, and honesty in the workplace. Dr. Murphy’s main areas of research include personnel selection and placement, performance appraisal, and psychological measurement. His current work focuses on understanding the validation process. He earned his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University in 1979; served on the faculties of Rice University, New York University, and Colorado State University; and has had visiting appointments at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Limerick.

Philip M. Neches is the chairman of Foundation Ventures, LLC. He is also an independent consultant working with early-stage companies in the information technology and communications service industries on their technical, market, and business strategies as an advisor, board member, and investor. A world-renowned authority on databases, he was the founder and chief scientist of Teradata Corporation, a leading database technology vendor. He began his career as the manager for the Systems Evaluation Group at Transaction Technology, Inc. (a Citicorp subsidiary),

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×

where he led analysis of consumer banking networks, including the first large-scale deployment of automated teller machines (ATMs) in the United States. Later at Teradata, he pioneered the application of parallel processing to commercial applications. As senior vice president and chief scientist for NCR Corporation, he led both the repositioning of NCR’s computer product family and the product plan for a merger with AT&T. Dr. Neches served as vice president and chief technical officer of Multimedia Products and Services Group at AT&T Corporation. He has served on the board of directors of ExpandBeyond, Inc., and on the advisory boards of EarthLink, Tacoda Systems, Luxtera, and the Technology Group of Merrill Lynch. Other prior directorships include MCC, Semitech, Dayton Public Radio, DemoGraFx, MediaMap, PeopleLink, and VendQuest. He serves on the Caltech board of trustees and sits on its technology transfer committee and chairs the student experience committee. Dr. Neches holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Caltech.

Charles “Casey” O’Brien is director of the National CyberWatch Center, an NSF Advanced Technological Education-funded cybersecurity consortium headquartered at Prince George’s Community College in Largo, Maryland. His major teaching and research interests include cyber exercise design and delivery, scalable and cost-effective information security laboratories, and information security curriculum development. Mr. O’Brien also teaches internationally and is a frequently invited speaker at various conferences. He has coordinated the Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition since 2005 and is a co-founder of the National Cyber League, which was founded in 2011 with the sole purpose of providing a training ground for students to develop cybersecurity skills through combined individual and team exercises via virtual “Cyber Stadiums.” Mr. O’Brien earned a B.A. in psychology from the University of St. Thomas and an M.A. in psychology from Duquesne University, and he holds various industry-recognized certifications.

Ronald P. Sanders is a senior executive advisor for Booz Allen Hamilton and the firm’s first Booz Allen Hamilton fellow. Dr. Sanders supports federal and other clients in the areas of human capital, learning, and organizational transformation. He joined the firm after completing 37 years of federal service; 20 of those years were in senior executive positions. Before coming to Booz Allen, Dr. Sanders served as the U.S. intelligence community’s (IC’s) associate director of national intelligence and first chief human capital officer, where he played a key role in the establishment of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the integration of the IC. He also served as the Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM’s) first associate director for human resource policy, with

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×

responsibility for all civil service policies and programs for millions of federal employees and retirees. Among his achievements at OPM, he led the creation of the Senior Executive Service’s revolutionary pay-for-performance system. Prior to his OPM appointment, Dr. Sanders served as the first chief human resources officer for the Internal Revenue Service, where he was honored for his leadership role in the service’s landmark restructuring. Other executive positions include director of civilian personnel for the Department of Defense (where he received the first of his three Presidential Rank awards), founding director of the Defense Civilian Personnel Service, and deputy director of civilian personnel for the Department of the Air Force. In that latter capacity, he earned the Air Force’s prestigious General Robert J. Dixon Leadership Award— the first and only civilian to be so honored. A finalist for the Service to America Career Achievement Medal, Dr. Sanders is also the recipient of the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal, three Presidential Rank Awards from three different agencies, two OPM Theodore Roosevelt Awards for Distinguished Public Service, and the American Society for Public Administration Award for Outstanding Career Service. He and his ODNI team also earned a coveted Harvard University Innovations in American Government award. In addition, Dr. Sanders taught and directed research centers at George Washington University and Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He is an adjunct faculty member with the Brookings Institution Center for Public Policy Education, chairs its Executive Education Advisory Board, and sits on the board of the American Society for Training and Development. He attended MIT’s Sloan School of Management Senior Executive Program and completed a congressional fellowship with the U.S. Senate Governmental Affairs Committee. A fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, Dr. Sanders earned his doctorate in public administration from George Washington University. He also holds an M.S. degree in human resource management from the University of Utah and a B.A. degree in business management from the University of South Florida.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×
Page 33
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×
Page 34
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2013. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce?: Criteria for Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18446.
×
Page 38
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Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce? Criteria for Decision-Making considers approaches to increasing the professionalization of the nation's cybersecurity workforce. This report examines workforce requirements for cybersecurity and the segments and job functions in which professionalization is most needed; the role of assessment tools, certification, licensing, and other means for assessing and enhancing professionalization; and emerging approaches, such as performance-based measures. It also examines requirements for the federal (military and civilian) workforce, the private sector, and state and local government. The report focuses on three essential elements: (1) understanding the context for cybersecurity workforce development, (2) considering the relative advantages, disadvantages, and approaches to professionalizing the nation's cybersecurity workforce, and (3) setting forth criteria that can be used to identify which, if any, specialty areas may require professionalization and set forth criteria for evaluating different approaches and tools for professionalization. Professionalizing the Nation's Cybersecurity Workforce? Criteria for Decision-Making characterizes the current landscape for cybersecurity workforce development and sets forth criteria that the federal agencies participating in the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education—as well as organizations that employ cybersecurity workers—could use to identify which specialty areas may require professionalization and to evaluate different approaches and tools for professionalization.

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