National Academies Press: OpenBook

Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau (1967)

Chapter: THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY

« Previous: Front Matter
Suggested Citation:"THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY." National Research Council. 1967. Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18460.
×
Page 1
Suggested Citation:"THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY." National Research Council. 1967. Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18460.
×
Page 2
Suggested Citation:"THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY." National Research Council. 1967. Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18460.
×
Page 3
Suggested Citation:"THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY." National Research Council. 1967. Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18460.
×
Page 4
Suggested Citation:"THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY." National Research Council. 1967. Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18460.
×
Page 5
Suggested Citation:"THE ROLE OF NUTRITION IN REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY." National Research Council. 1967. Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18460.
×
Page 6

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Definitions of Diet and Nutrition Diet is the daily fare of food and drink. It is some- times defined as a manner of living with special reference to eating practices. The diet furnishes nutrients which may or may not be sufficient to adequately meet the nutritive needs of the individual depending on age, size, activity, state of health, environment, and genetic pattern. Unfortunately the word is often used to mean something restrictive such as weight control regimen. Actually everyone is on a "diet" of some kind whether he lives in a developing country, a slum, or an elite suburb. Human Nutrition is the sum of the processes by which an organism absorbs and utilizes essential nutrients for the support of metabolism within the cell, stores for future use, or uses immediately for energy. It is also the sum of the influences which the intrinsic and extrinsic environment exerts upon these processes. Nutritional Status of the individual reflects both past and present dietary intake and its utilization by the body. Nutritional Counseling is a technique of communication and education by which dietary practices may be evaluated and changes for nutritive improvement indicated. Dietary counseling

necessitates knowledge of nutrition science and food values as well as of those psychological, socio-economic, and cultural factors which affect dietary practices.

CHAPTER II RECOMMENDED NUTRIENT ALLOWANCES FOR PREGNANCY AND LACTATION The objectives of effective programs of prenatal care are to create conditions most favorable for a normal, healthy pregnancy for the mother and birth at term of a healthy, fully- developed infant. The nutritional components concerned with the outcome of pregnancy (both maternal and fetal) must aim at provision of diets which provide calories and essential nutrients in amounts sufficient to meet all the needs for formation, growth, arid development of the fetus as well as the extra-fetal tissues and the metabolic and physiologic require- ments of the mother, which may include repletion of maternal stores. The time continuum for adequate nutrition extends throughout all of life, but it is of utmost importance through- out all of pregnancy and lactation in order to meet the different demands during this period. It begins with the needs during the first trimester, the critical period of initial cellular growth, multiplication, and differentiation and continues through the second and third trimesters. During the first trimester, the 7

Next: RECOMMENDED NUTRIENT ALLOWANCES FOR PREGNANCY AND LACTATION »
Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Report to the Children's Bureau reviews and interprets the current state of knowledge of the relationships between nutrition in pregnancy and the outcome of pregnancy for mother and infant. Public health statistics indicate that neonatal and infant mortality experience in the United States has not been as favorable in the most recent two decades as in some countries of Western Europe. Based on current nutrition concepts, this report served as a basis for the development of authoritative guidelines for the nutrition component of maternal and child health programs.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!