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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18620.
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B

Workshop Agenda

MAY 20-22, 2013 NATIONAL ACADEMIES KECK CENTER WASHINGTON, DC

May 20, 2013

8:00 am Welcome, Plan for the Workshop, and Participant Introductions

Lou Lanzerotti, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Workshop Committee Chair Art Charo, Space Studies Board

 
8:30 View From the Sponsors—Department of Defense (Air Force Office of Scientific Research) and National Science Foundation (GEO/AGS)

Kent Miller, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

Rich Behnke, National Science Foundation

 
Science and HF Active Experiments—Background for Workshop
 
9:00 Current HF Experiments and Capabilities Related to Workshop Statement of Task

Dennis Papadopoulos, University of Maryland

Dave Hysell, Cornell University

Paul Bernhardt, Naval Research Laboratory

 
10:00 Questions and Comments
 
10:45 Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Science Objectives: Guidance from the Decadal Survey, CEDAR/GEM, and Geo Vision

Josh Semeter, Boston University

 
11:20 Moderated Discussion: Development of Topics for Extended Discussion in the Four Workshop Focus Areas

Elizabeth Kendall, SRI International

 
12:30 pm Working Lunch
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18620.
×
Focus Area I: HF Contributions to M-I-T Science: MLT and Thermospheric Physics
 
1:30 Overview of Basic Issues in MLT (mesosphere/lower thermosphere) and Thermospheric Physics (15-minute presentations)

Mike Taylor, Utah State University

Tom Slanger, SRI International

Lara Waldrop, University of Illinois

Andrew Nagy, University of Michigan

 
2:30 Moderated Discussion: The Significance and Relevance of Current and Potential Contributions of HF Research to FA-I (in context of the statement of task)

Dave Hysell, Cornell University

 
Focus Area II: HF Contributions to M-I-T Science: Ionospheric Physics
 
3:45 Overview of Basic Issues in Ionospheric Physics (15-minute presentations)

Larry Paxton, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Meers Oppenheim, Boston University

Joe Huba, Naval Research Laboratory

Rob Pfaff, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

 
4:45 Moderated Discussion: The Significance and Relevance of Current and Potential Contributions of HF Research to FA-II (in context of the statement of task)

John Foster, MIT Haystack Observatory

 
5:45 Adjourn for the Day
 
6:00 Committee Dinner for Organizers and Invited Guests
 

May 21, 2013

 
Focus Area III: HF Contributions to M-I-T Science: Magnetospheric Physics
 
8:30 am Overview of Basic Issues in Magnetospheric Physics (15-minute presentations)

Bob Clauer, Virginia Polytechnic and State University

Chia-Lie Chang, BAE Systems

Lars Dyrud, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

 
9:30 Moderated Discussion: The Significance and Relevance of Current and Potential Contributions of HF Research to FA-III (in context of the statement of task)

Dennis Papadopoulos, University of Maryland

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18620.
×
Focus Area IV: HF Contributions to Applied and Operational Programs
 
11:00 Overview of Basic Issues Related to Ionospheric Modification (15 minute presentation)

Jade Morton, Miami University (Ohio)

Todd Pedersen, Air Force Research Laboratory

Evgeny Mishin, Air Force Research Laboratory

 
12:00 pm Working Lunch
 
1:00 Moderated Discussion: The Significance and Relevance of Current and Potential Contributions of HF Research to FA-IV (in context of the statement of task)

Paul Bernhardt, Naval Research Laboratory

 
2:10 Additional Topics for Workshop Discussion

•    Emerging science questions that could benefit from HF modification experiments

•    The role of collocated incoherent scatter radars

•    Applications and the impact of HF experiments on space weather, communications, and other areas in the national interest

 
3:15 Examining the Costs, Benefits, Trades, and Key Issues among the Options Identified in the Workshop
 
4:00 Wrap-up: Summarize Key Take-Away Items for Further Exploration
 
4:30 Workshop Adjourns
 

May 22, 2013

 
8:30 am Organizing Committee Convenes

•    Recap

•    Next Steps for Production of Workshop Summary

 
12:00 pm Adjourn/Lunch
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18620.
×
Page 52
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18620.
×
Page 53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2014. Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research: Report of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18620.
×
Page 54
Next: Appendix C: Workshop Participants »
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Opportunities for High-Power, High-Frequency Transmitters to Advance Ionospheric/Thermospheric Research is the summary of a workshop convened by the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council in May 2013. The request for this workshop was informed by the sponsors' awareness of the possibility that tight budgets would result in the Department of Defense's curtailment or even termination1 of support for the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), which includes the world's highest-power and most capable high-frequency transmitter - "heater" - for ionospheric research. Although the workshop was organized to consider the utility of heaters in upper atmospheric research in general, it had a specific focus on the HAARP transmitter facility, which is located in a remote part of southeastern Alaska.

Research conducted by the ionospheric modifications community - a community that uses high-frequency transmitters to inject energy in the ionosphere and measure its effects using ground and space-based diagnostics - is focused on understanding the interaction of radio waves with the ionospheric plasma, the local consequences of heating in the ionosphere, and studies of non-linear plasma physics processes. The workshop provided a forum for information exchange between the comparatively small group of scientists engaged in programs of upper atmospheric research using high-power high-frequency radar transmitters and the larger ionospherethermosphere-magnetosphere research community.

This report examines the state of the art in active ionospheric and thermospheric research; considers the fundamental research areas in ionospheric science that can be addressed using high-power high-frequency-band transmitters; discusses emerging science questions that might benefit from active ionospheric experiments in the sub-auroral zone; and considers ways to combine similar facilities to perform global ionospheric science. The report also examines research opportunities that might arise from the relocation of the AMISR incoherent scatter radar from the Poker Flat Research Facility in Poker Flat, AK to Gakona, AK, the location of the HAARP facility.

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