National Academies Press: OpenBook

Review of Department of Defense Test Protocols for Combat Helmets (2014)

Chapter: Appendix C: Committee Meetings and Data-Gathering Activities

« Previous: Appendix B: Protocols for First Article and Lot Acceptance Testing
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Meetings and Data-Gathering Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Review of Department of Defense Test Protocols for Combat Helmets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18621.
×

Appendix C


Committee Meetings and Data-Gathering Activities

FIRST COMMITTEE MEETING
JANUARY 24–25, 2013, ABERDEEN, MARYLAND

Objective: To introduce National Research Council (administrative actions, including committee introductions and composition, balance, and bias discussions for committee members); review committee statement of task with sponsor; visit the Aberdeen Test Center, examine equipment, and receive detailed presentations; and discuss future meeting dates and next steps.

Briefings and Discussions

Body Armor Study and Helmet Testing. Cameron R. Bass, Thomas F. Budinger, and Ronald D. Fricker, Former members, Committee on Testing of Body Armor—Phase II, and members, Committee to Review Test Protocols Used by the DoD to Test Combat Helmets.

Army Perspectives on Helmet Protection and Performance Requirements and Specifications. Ian Rozansky, Project Engineer, Office of the Product Manager for Soldier Protective Equipment, U.S. Army.

Marine Corps Perspectives on Helmet Protection and Performance Requirements and Specifications. Deidre Hooks, ECH Project Officer, and Kathy Halo, Project Engineer, Office of the Product Manager for Soldier Protective Equipment, U.S. Marine Corps.

Special Operations Forces Perspectives on Helmet Protection and Performance Requirements and Specifications. David Colanto, Project Officer—Helmets Office of the Program Manager, Special Operations Forces—Survival, Support and Equipment Systems (PM SOF-SSES).

Medical Research on Skull Behind Armor Blunt Trauma (BABT) and Injury Criteria. Richard Shoge, Deputy Port-folio Manager, Blast Injury/Hearing and Vision Protection, Military Operational Medicine Research Program, U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command.

The Peepsite Headform. Robert Kinsler, Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate, Army Research Laboratory.

Joint Live Fire Test Program Behind Helmet Blunt Trauma Skull Injury. Karin Rafaels, Survivability/Lethality Analysis Directorate, Army Research Laboratory.

Protocol Analyses and Statistical Issues Related to Testing Methodologies. Janice Hester, Research Staff Member, Institute for Defense Analysis.

SECOND COMMITTEE MEETING
MARCH 21–22, 2013, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Objective: To review documents and data received; receive briefings on perspectives on the new protocol; review preliminary report outline and confirm committee writing assignments; and discuss information-gathering requests, and confirm next steps.

Briefings and Discussions

Perspectives of the PEO Chief Scientist. James Zheng, Chief Scientist, Soldier Protective and Individual Equipment, PEO Soldier, U.S. Army.

Protocol Analyses and Statistical Issues Related to Testing Methodologies. Laura Freeman, Research Staff Member, Institute for Defense Analysis.

Presentation on IOP PED-003. Kyle Markwardt, Test Officer, Aberdeen Test Center.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Meetings and Data-Gathering Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Review of Department of Defense Test Protocols for Combat Helmets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18621.
×

DOT&E Issues Update. Christopher Moosmann, Live Fire Test and Evaluation Office of the Director, Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E).

Perspectives on the New Protocol. Robby Young, Manager of Quality Engineering, Gentex Corporation; David Rogers, Vice President of Concept Development Ops-Core, Artisent LLC (a subsidiary of Gentex); with, by video and teleconference, Clayton Maddio, Sector Integrator, and Kenneth Williams, Lead Platform Command Defense Contract Management Agency.

Perspectives on the New Protocol. Marc A. King, President, Ceradyne Armor Systems, Inc.; Vasilios Brachos, General Manager, Diaphorm Division, and head of R&D for helmet products, Ceradyne, Inc.

THIRD COMMITTEE MEETING
APRIL 25–26, 2013, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Objective: To review documents and data received; to receive briefings on perspectives on the new protocol; review the concept draft; confirm committee writing assignments; and discuss information-gathering requests, and confirm next steps.

Briefings and Discussions

Setting the Specifications for Ballistic Helmets. Frank J. Lozano, Product Manager, Soldier Protective Equipment, U.S. Army.

Blast Injury Research. Natalie Eberius, Predictive Analysis Team Leader, Survivability and Lethality Analysis Directorate, Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Grounds.

Helmet Performance Testing with Respect to Head and Brain Injury Prevention. Carol Chancey, Injury Biomechanics Branch Chief, U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (via video teleconference).

FOURTH COMMITTEE MEETING
JUNE 17–18, 2013, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Objective: To review documents and data received; receive a briefing from the Office of the DoD Inspector General; review the first-full-message draft; confirm committee writing assignments; and discuss information-gathering requests, and confirm next steps.

Briefing

Advanced Combat Helmet Technical Assessment. Anna Ferre, Tom Bulk, Kandasamy Selvavel, and Rajesh Rajendrapillai, Office of the Inspector General.

FIFTH COMMITTEE MEETING
JULY 29–30, 2013, WOODS HOLE, MASSACHUSETTS

Objective: To review documents and data received; review the concurrence draft; confirm committee writing assignments; and confirm next steps.

SIXTH COMMITTEE MEETING
OCTOBER 10–12, 2013, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Objective: To review the concurrence draft and reach concurrence on findings and recommendations.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Meetings and Data-Gathering Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Review of Department of Defense Test Protocols for Combat Helmets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18621.
×
Page 122
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Committee Meetings and Data-Gathering Activities." National Research Council. 2014. Review of Department of Defense Test Protocols for Combat Helmets. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18621.
×
Page 123
Next: Appendix D: Test Range Description and the Ballistic Testing Process »
Review of Department of Defense Test Protocols for Combat Helmets Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $54.00 Buy Ebook | $43.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Combat helmets have evolved considerably over the years from those used in World War I to today's Advanced Combat Helmet. One of the key advances was the development of aramid fibers in the 1960s, which led to today's Kevlar-based helmets. The Department of Defense is continuing to invest in research to improve helmet performance, through better design and materials as well as better manufacturing processes.

Review of the Department of Defense Test Protocols for Combat Helmets considers the technical issues relating to test protocols for military combat helmets. At the request of the DOD Director of Operational Test and Evaluation, this report evaluates the adequacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet test protocol for both first article testing and lot acceptance testing, including its use of the metrics of probability of no penetration and the upper tolerance limit (used to evaluate backface deformation). The report evaluates appropriate use of statistical techniques in gathering data; adequacy of current helmet testing procedures; procedures for the conduct of additional analysis of penetration and backface deformation data; and scope of characterization testing relative to the benefit of the information obtained.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!