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Recommendation for Increased Iron Levels in the American Diet (1969)

Chapter: Recommendation for Increased Iron Levels in the American Diet

Suggested Citation:"Recommendation for Increased Iron Levels in the American Diet." National Research Council. 1969. Recommendation for Increased Iron Levels in the American Diet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18665.
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Suggested Citation:"Recommendation for Increased Iron Levels in the American Diet." National Research Council. 1969. Recommendation for Increased Iron Levels in the American Diet. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18665.
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REFERENCE COPY FOR LIBRARY USE ONLY COMPLIMENTS of the FOOD AND NUTWTiON IQARD NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL 2101 Constitution Avenue Washington 25, D. C. RECOMMENDATION FOR INCREASED IRON LEVELS IN THE AMERICAN DIET November 1969 PROPERTY OF NRC LIBRARY FOOD AND NUTRITION BOARD NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL 2101 Constitution Avenue Washington, D. C. 20418

RECOMMENDATION FOR INCREASED IRON LEVELS IN THE AMERICAN DIET According to the Food Consumption Surveys by the U. S. Department of Agriculture in 1965,* the dietary iron intake of the female population between 10 and 55 years of age averaged about 11 mg per day whereas the recommended dietary allowance is 18 mg per day. ^ in order to rectify this discrepancy, the Food and Nutrition Board considers that the dietary iron intake by the female population in this age range should be increased by at least 5 mg per day. The forms of iron used for this purpose should be such as to ensure 10 percent absorption. The Board believes that this can be accomplished most readily by increasing the levels of iron now prescribed by federal standards for enriched cereal products. Therefore, the Board recommends that the standards of identity for flour and bread enrichment be changed to permit the addition of no less than 40 mg or more than 60 mg per pound of flour and no less than 25 mg or more than 40 mg per pound of bread. The desirable goal is a minimum of 50 mg of iron per pound of en- riched flour and 30 mg of iron per pound of bread. It further recommends that wherever technically feasible, enriched wheat flour be used for the preparation of specialty bakery products, which are not now enriched. The Board also recommends that the standards of identity for enrichment of corn meal, corn grits, rice, farina, macaroni and noodle products be changed to permit the addition of no less than 40 mg and no more than 60 mg per pound. The Board recognizes that there is need for more information about the extent of iron deficiency in the United States. The Board is also cognizant

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