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Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014 (2014)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
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Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Jeff Walters, Chair, is the Harold Bailey Professor of Biology at Virginia Tech, a position he has held since 1994. His professional experience includes assistant, associate, and full professorships at North Carolina State University from 1980 until 1994. Dr. Walters has done extensive research and published many articles on the red-cockaded woodpeckers in North Carolina and Florida, and he chaired an American Ornithologists’ Union Conservation Committee Review that looked at the biology, status, and management of the Cape Sable seaside sparrow, a bird endemic to the Everglades. His research interests are in the behavioral ecology, population biology, and conservation of birds, and his recent work has focused on cooperative breeding, dispersal behavior, and endangered species issues. Dr. Walters served in two panels of the Sustainable Ecosystems Institute that addressed issues with endangered birds in the Everglades restoration in addition to previously serving as a member of the NRC’s Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem and the first and fourth Committees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He holds a B.A. from West Virginia University and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Mary Jane Angelo is professor of law at the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law and Director of the Environmental and Land Use Law Program. Her research areas focus on environmental law, water law, administrative law, biotechnology law, dispute resolution, pesticides law, law and science, and legal ethics. Prior to joining the faculty, Ms. Angelo served as an attorney in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of General Counsel and as senior assistant general counsel for the St. Johns River Water Management District. She received her B.S. in biological sciences from Rutgers University and her M.S. and J.D. from the University of Florida.

David B. Ashley is professor of civil engineering at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV). Dr. Ashley also served as the eighth president at the school

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×

from 2006 to 2009. Prior to joining UNLV, President Ashley served as executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, Merced, and held the Shaffer-George Chair in Engineering. He has also served as dean of engineering at The Ohio State University and has held civil engineering faculty positions at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Texas at Austin, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Ashley’s principal research and teaching activities are in the area of construction project planning, focusing primarily on risk analysis and management of large-scale, complex projects. His recent studies have addressed innovative project financing and new project procurement approaches. He has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Assessing the Results of External Independent Reviews for U.S. Department of Energy Projects. Dr. Ashley received a B.S. in civil engineering and an M.S. in civil engineering–project management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.S. in engineering–economic systems, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering–constructing, engineering, and management from Stanford University.

Loretta L. Battaglia is an associate professor of plant biology at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Her research interests focus on the dynamics of wetland plant communities and the ecological processes that link them with the surrounding landscape. Specifically, her research is focused on the effects of climate change and large-scale phenomena, such as exotic species invasions, on community structure and function, as well as development of restoration targets for coastal wetlands undergoing rapid climate change. She received her B.S. in zoology and her M.S. in biological sciences from the University of Louisiana, Monroe, and her Ph.D. in ecology from the University of Georgia.

William G. Boggess is professor and executive associate dean of the College of Agricultural Sciences at Oregon State University (OSU). Prior to joining OSU, Dr. Boggess spent 16 years on the faculty at the University of Florida in the Food and Resource Economics Department. His research interests include interactions between agriculture and the environment (e.g., water allocation, groundwater contamination, surface-water pollution, sustainable systems); economic dimensions and indicators of ecosystem health; and applications of real options to environmental and natural resources. Dr. Boggess previously served on the Oregon Governor’s Council of Economic Advisors and the Board of Directors of the American Agricultural Economics Association, and he currently serves on the Board of the Oregon Environmental Council. He served on the State of Oregon Environment Report Science Panel and has been active in the design and assessment of the Oregon Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program. Dr. Boggess served as a member of the National Research Council Commit-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×

tee on the Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater Effluents and Sludge in the Production of Crops for Human Consumption, and on the second, third, and fourth Committees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress serving as chair of the fourth committee. He received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 1979.

Charles T. Driscoll (NAE) is university professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University where he also serves as the director of the Center for Environmental Systems Engineering. His teaching and research interests are in the area of environmental chemistry, biogeochemistry, and environmental quality modeling. A principal research focus has been the response of forest, aquatic, and coastal ecosystems to disturbance, including air pollution, land-use change, climate change, and elevated inputs of nutrients and mercury. Dr. Driscoll is currently a principal investigator of the National Science Foundation’s Long Term Ecological Research Network’s project at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Panel on Process of Lake Acidification, the Committees on Air Quality Management in the U.S. and the Collaborative Large-Scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER), and the second, third, and fourth Committees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. He is a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Driscoll received his B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Maine and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Cornell University.

Paul H. Glaser is a research professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Minnesota (Twin Cities campus) with appointments to the Graduate Faculty in Earth Sciences and Conservation Biology. He is a fellow of the Geological Society of America and a member-at-large of the Geology and Geography Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His current research interests are focused on wetland-groundwater interactions in peatlands with special reference to carbon cycling and greenhouse gases. However, his research interests are cross-disciplinary, spanning the fields of wetland ecology, hydrology, biogeochemistry, and paleoecology. Dr. Glaser earned his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1978.

William L. Graf is Foundation University Distinguished Professor, Emeritus, at the University of South Carolina. His expertise is in fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. Dr. Graf’s research and teaching have focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river pro-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×

cesses, morphology, and ecology, along with contaminant transport and storage in river systems. His present work emphasizes the downstream effects of dams on rivers. In the arena of public policy, he has emphasized the interaction of science and decision making, and the resolution of conflicts among economic development, historical preservation, and environmental restoration for rivers. Dr. Graf has served as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Water Science and Technology Board and Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, the Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative, the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, and the first three Committees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress, serving as chair of the second committee. He is chair of the NRC’s Geographical Sciences Committee. He is also a national associate of the National Academies and an American Association for the Advancement of Science fellow. Dr. Graf earned a certificate of water resources management and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Stephen G. Monismith is chair of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department and Obayashi Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. His research in environmental and geophysical fluid dynamics is focused on the application of fluid mechanics principles to the analysis of flow processes operating in rivers, lakes, estuaries, and the oceans. Flows that involve physical-biological interactions are of particular interest to him. Dr. Monismith has previous National Research Council experience, having served on the Panel to Review California’s Draft Bay Delta Conservation Plan and the Committee on Sustainable Water and Environmental Management in the California Bay-Delta. He earned his B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley.

David H. Moreau is research professor, Department of City and Regional Planning, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He recently completed a term as chair of the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology. His research interests include analysis, planning, financing, and evaluation of water resource, water quality, and related environmental programs. Dr. Moreau is engaged in water resources planning at the local, state, and national levels. He has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Projects Review, the Committee on the Mississippi River and Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico, and the second, third, and fourth Committees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. Dr. Moreau recently completed 19 years as a member and 16 years as chairman of the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission, the state’s regulatory commission for water quality, air quality, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×

water allocation. For his service to North Carolina he was awarded the Order of the Long Leaf Pine, the highest civilian award offered by the state. He received his B.S. and M.S. from Mississippi State University and North Carolina State University, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree from Harvard University.

K. Ramesh Reddy is graduate research professor and chair of the Department of Soil and Water Science at the University of Florida. His research areas include biogeochemistry, soil and water quality, ecological indicators, and restoration of wetlands and aquatic systems. Dr. Reddy investigates biogeochemical cycling of macronutrients in natural ecosystems, including wetlands, shallow lakes, estuaries, and constructed wetlands, as related to soil and water quality, carbon sequestration, and greenhouse gas emissions. He served as a member of the U.S. National Committee for Soil Sciences in the National Academy’s Policy and Global Affairs Division. He served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board Panel. Dr. Reddy served as a member of the second and third Committees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. Dr. Reddy earned his Ph.D. in agronomy and soil science from Louisiana State University.

Helen Regan is an associate professor of biology at the University of California, Riverside. Her research areas span quantitative conservation ecology and probabilistic risk assessment. Dr. Regan has applied population models, uncertainty analyses, and decision-making techniques to address a variety of conservation and wildlife management issues. She focuses on methodological issues of these techniques, the practicalities of their application and their interpretation for management. Projects include ecological risk assessment of chemical contaminants, population viability of species impacted by a range threats, monitoring of multiple species habitat conservation plans, population-level effects of habitat fragmentation, and fire and disease on plants in fire-prone ecosystems. Current research includes examination of the impact of uncertainty on potential adaptation strategies for threatened species impacted by climate change. She currently serves on the Standards and Petitions Subcommittee of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature Species Survival Commission and on the scientific advisory committee for the Australian Centre of Excellence for Risk Analysis. Dr. Regan received her B.S. from LaTrobe University and her Ph.D. from the University of New England in Armidale, both in Australia.

James E. Saiers is professor of hydrology, associate dean of Academic Affairs, and professor of chemical engineering at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Dr. Saiers studies the circulation of water and the movement of waterborne chemicals in surface and subsurface environments. One element

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×

of his research centers on quantifying the effects that interactions between hydrologic and geochemical processes have on the migration of contaminants in groundwater. Another focus is on the dynamics of surface-water and groundwater flow in wetlands and the response of fluid flow characteristics to changes in climate and water management practices. His work couples field observations and laboratory-scale experimentation with mathematical modeling. He earned his B.S. in geology from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia.

Daniel Simberloff (NAS) is the Nancy Gore Hunger Professor of Environmental Science in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. His research centers on ecology, statistical ecology, bio-geography, evolution, and conservation biology, and addresses plants, insects, birds, and mammals. Specifically, his research focuses on invasion biology, community composition and structure, and community morphological structure. He maintains an extensive world-wide field research program focused on issues of biological invasions and global change and is a leading innovator in the application of statistical methods to large ecological data sets. Dr. Simberloff is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Ecological Society of America’s Eminent Ecologist Award and the Ramon Margalef Award for Ecology. He has served on multiple National Research Council (NRC) committees and was a member of the NRC Board on Life Sciences. He received his A.B. and Ph.D. from Harvard University.

STAFF

Stephanie E. Johnson, study director, is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the National Research Council in 2002, she has worked on a wide range of water-related studies, on topics such as desalination, wastewater reuse, contaminant source remediation, coal and uranium mining, coastal risk reduction, and ecosystem restoration. She has served as study director for 15 committees, including the Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative and all five Committees on Independent Scientific Review of Everglades Restoration Progress. Dr. Johnson received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia.

David J. Policansky is a scholar of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He earned a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Oregon. Dr. Policansky has directed approximately 35 National Research Council studies,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×

and his areas of expertise include genetics; evolution; ecology, including fishery biology; natural resource management; and the use of science in policy making.

Michael J. Stoever is a research associate with the Water Science and Technology Board. He has worked on a number of studies including Desalination: A National Perspective, the Water Implications of Biofuels Production in the United States, and the Committee on Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration. He has also worked on National Research Council studies on the National Flood Insurance Program, the effect of water withdrawals on the St. Johns River, and Chesapeake Bay restoration. Mr. Stoever received his B.A. in political science from The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey in Pomona.

Sarah E. Brennan is a senior program assistant with the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB). Since joining the NRC in 2010, she has worked on six projects including Everglades restoration progress, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ water resources, and water and environmental management in the California bay delta. Before joining WSTB, Ms. Brennan was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ghana, West Africa. She Received her B.S. in international development from Susquehanna University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Research Council. 2014. Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades: The Fifth Biennial Review: 2014. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18809.
×
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The Everglades ecosystem is vast, stretching more than 200 miles from Orlando to Florida Bay, and Everglades National Park is but a part located at the southern end. During the 19th and 20th centuries, the historical Everglades has been reduced to half of its original size, and what remains is not the pristine ecosystem many image it to be, but one that has been highly engineered and otherwise heavily influenced, and is intensely managed by humans. Rather than slowly flowing southward in a broad river of grass, water moves through a maze of canals, levees, pump stations, and hydraulic control structures, and a substantial fraction is diverted from the natural system to meet water supply and flood control needs. The water that remains is polluted by phosphorus and other contaminants originating from agriculture and other human activities. Many components of the natural system are highly degraded and continue to degrade.

Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades is the fifth biennial review of progress made in meeting the goals of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). This complex, multibillion-dollar project to protect and restore the remaining Everglades has a 30-40 year timeline. This report assesses progress made in the various separate project components and discusses specific scientific and engineering issues that may impact further progress. According to Progress Toward Restoring the Everglades, a dedicated source of funding could provide ongoing long-term system-wide monitoring and assessment that is critical to meeting restoration objectives. The report makes recommendations for restoration activities, project management strategies, management of invasive nonnative species, and high-priority research needs.

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