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Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop (2014)

Chapter: Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
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Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters

Lisa Berkman is Thomas D. Cabot professor of public policy and of epidemiology and director of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Prior to becoming director, she was chair of the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health from 1995–2008. She is also the former head of the Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology at Yale University. She is a member of the Conseil Scientifique de l’Institut de Recherche en Sante Publique (IReSP) in France and of the Institute of Medicine. She has a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley.

John Bongaarts is a Population Council vice president and distinguished scholar, where he has worked since 1973. He serves as chairman of the National Research Council Panel on Population Projections. He is a member of the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has a Ph.D. in physiology and biomedical engineering from the University of Illinois.

John L. Casti is a research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Laxenburg, Austria, where he heads an initiative for the study of Extreme Events in Human Society. He has worked at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, CA, and served on the faculties of the University of Arizona, New York University, and Princeton University. In 2000, he formed two companies devoted to the employment

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×

of tools and concepts from modern system theory for the solution of problems in business and finance. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics at the University of Southern California in 1970.

James E. (Jae) Edmonds is a chief scientist and Battelle Laboratory Fellow at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Joint Global Change Research Institute and adjunct professor of public policy at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is the principal investigator for the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program to Address Climate Change. He has served in the capacity of lead author on every major Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment to date and presently serves on the IPCC Steering Committee on New Integrated Scenarios. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Duke University.

Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue is an associate professor in the Department of Development Sociology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University. His research areas include the sociology of education, social change, and the demography of inequality, with a major focus on refining existing frameworks for estimation of the effects of demographic change on the formation of human capital. He is a member of the International Advisory Board for the World Family Map Project, a member of the board of trustees of the U.S. Population Reference Bureau, and a panel chair for the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. His Ph.D. is from Pennsylvania State University.

Andrew Jorgenson serves as the director of graduate studies of the Sociology Department at the University of Utah. He is also a member of the American Sociological Association’s Task Force on Sociology and Global Climate Change and affiliated with the Scholars Strategy Network. His Ph.D. is from the University of California, Riverside.

Wolfgang Lutz is leader of the World Population Program of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, director of the Vienna Institute of Demography of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, professor of applied statistics at the WU-Vienna, and professorial research fellow at the Oxford Institute of Ageing. He is coprincipal investigator of the Asian MetaCentre for Population and Sustainable Development and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Population. He holds a Ph.D. in demography from the University of Pennsylvania and a second doctorate (Habilitation) in statistics from the University of Vienna.

Peter Marcotullio is associate professor in the Department of Geography, Hunter College, City University of New York (CUNY). He is also

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×

codirector of the Environmental Studies Program at Hunter College and the codeputy director of the CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities. From 2001–2005, he participated in the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment as the co-coordinating lead author of the urban systems chapter. He is program associate with the International Human Dimensions Program’s Urbanization and Global Environmental Change project and council member of the International Council on Ecopolis Development. He holds a Ph.D. in urban planning from Columbia University.

Branko Milanović is a lead economist in the World Bank’s research department. Previously, he was a World Bank country economist for Poland and a research fellow at the Institute of Economic Sciences in Belgrade. Since 1996, he has also served as a visiting professor at the Johns Hopkins University’s School for Advanced International Studies. He was a senior associate on a 2-year assignment with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Global Policy Program, and he remained an adjunct scholar with the Endowment until early 2010. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Belgrade University.

Siwa Msangi is senior research fellow within the Environment and Production Technology Division and leads the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) research theme on Global Food and Natural Resources. He manages a research portfolio that includes the economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable intensification of agriculture, aquaculture and livestock, biofuels and the bioeconomy, climate change impacts on agriculture, and climate adaptation, as well as resource management of surface and groundwater. His Ph.D. is from the University of California, Davis.

Brian O’Neill leads the Integrated Assessment Modeling group within the Climate Change Research section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He worked previously at the Environmental Defense Fund and on the faculty of the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University. In addition, he founded and led from 2005–2009 the Population and Climate Change Program of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis. His Ph.D. is from New York University in earth systems science.

Stephen Polasky holds the Fesler-Lampert chair in ecological/environmental economics at the University of Minnesota. He previously held faculty positions in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at Oregon State University (1993–1999) and the Department of Economics at Boston College (1986–1993). He was elected into the National Academy

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×

of Sciences in 2010. He was elected as a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009 and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2007. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

William B. Rouse is a researcher, educator, author, and entrepreneur. His current positions include Alexander Crombie Humphreys chair in economics of engineering in the School of Systems and Enterprises at Stevens Institute of Technology, professor emeritus in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, and principal of Rouse Associates, LLC. His earlier positions include executive director of the Tennenbaum Institute and chair of the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech, CEO of two software companies, and earlier faculty positions at Georgia Tech, University of Illinois, Delft University of Technology, and Tufts University. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. He received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Juliet Schor is professor of sociology at Boston College. Before joining Boston College, she taught at Harvard University for 17 years, in the Department of Economics and the Committee on Degrees in Women’s Studies. Schor is a cofounder of the Center for a New American Dream, a national sustainability organization; of the South End Press; and of the Center for Popular Economics. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Massachusetts.

Karen Seto is co-chair of the Urbanization and Global Environmental Change Project of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change, and a coordinating lead author for Working Group III of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. She also serves on several National Research Council committees, as well as the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Steering Group. From 2002-2008, she was the Global Thematic Leader for Ecosystem Management Tools for the Commission on Ecosystem Management of the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Her Ph.D. in geography was earned at Boston University.

Billie Lee Turner II is the Gilbert F. White professor of environment and society in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University and a research professor in the Graduate School

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×

of Geography at Clark University. He is engaged in the study of human-environment relationships through an examination of the use of land and resources by the ancient Maya civilization in the Yucatan peninsular region; the intensification of land use among contemporary smallholders in the tropics; and land use and land-cover change as part of global environmental change. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He earned his Ph.D. in geography from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters." National Research Council. 2014. Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People?: Summary of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18817.
×
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The Earth's population, currently 7.2 billion, is expected to rise at a rapid rate over the next 40 years. Current projections state that the Earth will need to support 9.6 billion people by the year 2050, a figure that climbs to nearly 11 billion by the year 2100. At the same time, most people envision a future Earth with a greater average standard of living than we currently have - and, as a result, greater consumption of our planetary resources. How do we prepare our planet for a future population of 10 billion? How can this population growth be achieved in a manner that is sustainable from an economic, social, and environmental perspective?

Can Earth's and Society's Systems Meet the Needs of 10 Billion People? is the summary of a multi-disciplinary workshop convened by the National Academies in October 2013 to explore how to increase the world's population to 10 billion in a sustainable way while simultaneously increasing the well-being and standard of living for that population. This report examines key issues in the science of sustainability that are related to overall human population size, population growth, aging populations, migration toward cities, differential consumption, and land use change, by different subpopulations, as viewed through the lenses of both social and natural science.

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