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Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science (2015)

Chapter: Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
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Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

NANCY J. COOKE (Chair) is a professor of applied psychology at Arizona State University and science director and on the board of directors of the Cognitive Engineering Research Institute in Mesa, Arizona. She is also a section editor of Human Factors and serves on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. Currently, she supervises postdoctoral, graduate, and undergraduate research on team cognition with applications in design and training for military command-and-control systems, emergency response, medical systems, and uninhabited aerial systems. Cooke received a B.A. in psychology from George Mason University and received her M.A. and Ph.D. in cognitive psychology in 1983 and 1987, respectively, from New Mexico State University.

ROGER D. BLANDFORD (NAS) is the Luke Blossom professor in the School of Humanities and the Sciences at Stanford University, where he also serves as director of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology. His research interests cover many aspects of particle astrophysics and cosmology. He was an undergraduate and research student at Cambridge University and held postdoctoral positions at Cambridge University, Princeton University, and the University of California, Berkeley, before joining the faculty of the California Institute of Technology in 1976.

JONATHON N. CUMMINGS is an associate professor of management at the Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. He was an assistant professor in the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he received an National Science Foundation Early Career Award for his research on innovation in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
×

geographically dispersed teams and networks. His subsequent research has focused on virtual teams in corporations as well as collaboration in science. He earned his B.A. in psychology from the University of Michigan, A.M. in psychology from Harvard University, and Ph.D. in organization sciences from Carnegie Mellon University.

STEPHEN M. FIORE is an associate professor of cognitive sciences in the University of Central Florida’s (UCF) Department of Philosophy and director of the Cognitive Sciences Laboratory at UCF’s Institute for Simulation and Training. He also serves as the current president of the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research and is a founding program committee member for the annual Science of Team Science conference. His primary area of research is the interdisciplinary study of complex collaborative problem solving. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Pittsburgh, Learning Research and Development Center.

KARA L. HALL is a health scientist, director of the Science of Team Science Team, and co-director of the Theories Project in the Science of Research and Technology Branch at the National Cancer Institute. She served as a co-chair for the 2006 conference “The Science of Team Science: Assessing the Value of Transdisciplinary Research” and co-edited the American Journal of Preventive Medicine Special Supplement on the Science of Team Science. She earned her master’s and doctoral degrees in psychology with specializations in clinical psychology, neuropsychology, and behavioral science at the University of Rhode Island.

JAMES S. JACKSON (IOM) is the Daniel Katz distinguished university professor of psychology, professor of health behavior and health education, School of Public Health, and director and research professor of the Institute for Social Research, at the University of Michigan. He is the past chair of the Social Psychology Training Program and director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics, the Program for Research on Black Americans, and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, all at the University of Michigan. He earned his Ph.D. in social psychology from Wayne State University.

JOHN L. KING is the W.W. Bishop professor of information, former dean of the School of Information, and former vice provost at the University of Michigan. In 2000, he joined the University of Michigan after 20 years on the faculty of the University of California, Irvine. He has been Marvin Bower fellow at the Harvard Business School, distinguished visiting professor at the National University of Singapore and at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, and Fulbright distinguished chair in American

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
×

Studies at the University of Frankfurt. He holds a Ph.D. in administration from the University of California, Irvine, and an honorary doctorate in economics from Copenhagen Business School.

STEVE W.J. KOZLOWSKI is a professor of organizational psychology at Michigan State University. His research is focused on the design of active learning systems and the use of “synthetic experience” to train adaptive skills, systems for enhancing team learning and team effectiveness, and the critical role of team leaders in the development of adaptive teams. He holds a B.A. in psychology from the University of Rhode Island and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in organizational psychology from Pennsylvania State University.

JUDITH S. OLSON is the Bren professor of information and computer sciences in the Informatics Department at the University of California, Irvine, with courtesy appointments in the School of Social Ecology and the Merage School of Business. She has researched teams whose members are not co-located for more than 20 years. Her current work focuses on ways to verify her theory’s components while at the same time helping new scientific collaborations succeed. She has also been studying the adoption of the new suite of collaboration tools in Google Apps. She holds a B.A. from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

JEREMY A. SABLOFF (NAS) is the president of the Santa Fe Institute. Before joining the institute, he taught at Harvard University, University of Utah, University of New Mexico (where he was chair of the department), University of Pittsburgh (where he also was chair), and University of Pennsylvania (where he was the Williams director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum and Christopher H. Browne distinguished professor of anthropology). He also was an overseas visiting fellow at St. John’s College, Cambridge, England. He earned a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

DANIEL S. STOKOLS is a research professor and chancellor’s professor emeritus in psychology and social behavior and planning, policy, and design at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). He holds courtesy appointments in public health, epidemiology, and nursing sciences at UCI. He served as director and founding dean of the UCI School of Social Ecology from 1988 to 1998. He earned his B.A. at the University of Chicago and his Ph.D. in social psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

BRIAN UZZI is the Richard L. Thomas distinguished professor of leadership at the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. He

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
×

also directs the Northwestern University Institute on Complex Systems and is a professor of sociology and management science at the McCormick School of Engineering. He has also been on the faculty of Harvard University, INSEAD, University of Chicago, and University of California, Berkeley, where he was the Warren E. and Carol Spieker professor of leadership. He has a B.A. in business economics from Hofstra University, and a Ph.D. in sociology from State University of New York, Stony Brook.

HANNAH VALANTINE is the chief officer for scientific workforce diversity at the National Institutes of Health and professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research interests include diversity of the scientific workforce and pathophysiology of transplant-related atherosclerosis. In November 2004, she was appointed as senior associate dean for diversity and leadership in the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is a graduate of St. George’s Hospital, London University. She earned her M.D. from London University, London, completed her residency at St. George’s Hospital, Brompton Hospital and Guys Hospital London, and her cardiology fellowship training at Royal Postgraduate Medical School in Hammersmith London.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
×
Page 265
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
×
Page 266
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
×
Page 267
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19007.
×
Page 268
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The past half-century has witnessed a dramatic increase in the scale and complexity of scientific research. The growing scale of science has been accompanied by a shift toward collaborative research, referred to as "team science." Scientific research is increasingly conducted by small teams and larger groups rather than individual investigators, but the challenges of collaboration can slow these teams' progress in achieving their scientific goals. How does a team-based approach work, and how can universities and research institutions support teams?

Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science synthesizes and integrates the available research to provide guidance on assembling the science team; leadership, education and professional development for science teams and groups. It also examines institutional and organizational structures and policies to support science teams and identifies areas where further research is needed to help science teams and groups achieve their scientific and translational goals. This report offers major public policy recommendations for science research agencies and policymakers, as well as recommendations for individual scientists, disciplinary associations, and research universities. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science will be of interest to university research administrators, team science leaders, science faculty, and graduate and postdoctoral students.

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